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In the Name of God بسم الله

Reza

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  1. Like
    Reza got a reaction from baradar_jackson for a blog entry, Welcome!   
    Welcome to the revitalized Volcano Republic Blog! Feel free to hang around if you like. 
  2. Like
    Reza got a reaction from Hameedeh for a blog entry, Welcome!   
    Welcome to the revitalized Volcano Republic Blog! Feel free to hang around if you like. 
  3. Like
    Reza got a reaction from Abu-Jafar Herz for a blog entry, For Those Who Are Perfectionistic...   
    A very important point for self-reflection. Has our youthful generation become overly conscious of ourselves, to a narcissistic degree of over self-importance? Is our demands for the ideal aesthetic, a customized and polished version of the individual, an obsession with ourselves as the ultimate adaptive social creature, leading us towards excess fragility and anxiety? Why this fixation and compulsion with making ourselves the perfect product?
    Why this excessive idealism towards manufactured goals, and this unhealthy self-shaming when we can't achieve it? In this modern age, it feels like the gap between potential and reality is getting narrower. What was once unobtainable seems to be possible, as development and mass culture trickles down into even depraved hands. In relatively egalitarian Western societies, the individual is led to believe they are the master of their own narrative, as self-declared protagonists in a self-directed story, with an endless assortment of tools, facades, symbolisms, lifestyles, expression mediums, representations, and smokescreens available. The competitiveness to get the image "just right" is enormous, and the pressures that we put on each other and ourselves is crazy.
    From an Islamic perspective, its in our nature to strive towards perfection, to become an ideal believer and human being, in the image of God's principles. It's natural to feel shame, guilt, and self-consciousness for our shortcomings and misdeeds, and a desire to conceal them (see discussions on veils in Islam). But the key difference is that Islam defines perfection as our base, God-created humanity, and not through the lens of trendy, built up illusions and enhancements, created by mankind as obfuscations. We were created perfect, and we must simply protect and uphold what's already in our natures. Our faces were born perfect, our speech was born perfect, our spirits were born perfect. No lifehacks, PR campaigns, plastic surgeries, role playing, focus grouping, or image building is necessary.
    Peace will be felt when we submit to the real creator of our blueprint, of who we really are, rather than painfully burdening ourselves by usurping that role, and manufacturing a quintessential "perfect human", only narrowly useful in this very relative and disposable age. Which is why I believe that narcissism, perfectionism, and the increased self-importance of people is a sign of weakening faith, psychological stress, and social decay, because it questions and replaces the true created perfection of humankind with an artificial and contrived fantasy, often to serve self-interest, commercial needs, or both. 
    In short, to Allah, we are perfect and normal as we already are. Leave the creation and shaping of man to him, we must simply live it as he has revealed. Do not put more pressure on yourself than necessary. There is no value in pushing and punishing yourself for failing to meet contrived standards of beauty, behavior, or accomplishment set by the media or whomever else. Love God unconditionally, love yourself as you are, and be yourself. Do not adhere to rigid orthodoxies or values that come from indifferent and corruptible sources. Do not set personal standards for yourself that are based on fantasy or an illusion. Don't let yourself believe you are deficient because you don't have the right trinkets or crack the perfect tooth smile at the camera. Any smile, with sincerity and goodwill, will be important and valued by those who matter. Believe in yourself.
     
    A brief excerpt from an academic paper on this issue of perfectionism among the millennial generation:
    Quote Perfectionism & Millennials: How to Treat Perfectionism in Therapy
    Posted on November 14, 2013 By Michael Brustein | 0 comments Posted in: Psychology, Social Work & Counseling TAGS: Therapy, Perfectionism, Millenial Generation, mental health Millennials are often described as entitled with unrealistic expectations regarding their career. They have been referred to as lazy, hyper image-conscious, narcissistic and depressed about a life of mediocrity.  Are the labels and negative stereotypes given to Millennials perpetuated by envious baby boomers? Possibly.  Nonetheless there is some research coinciding with the typical Millennial labels that are thought-provoking.  For example, the majority of middle school girls polled in 2007 would rather be an assistant to a celebrity than a senator or a CEO.  According to a study conducted in 2009 by the Institute of National Health, college students had a 58% increase in narcissism in comparison students assessed in 1982 (Time, 5/20/2013).
    I have seen a substantial portion of Millennial patients in my private practice.  My observation about Millennials is that some have narcissism, but they equally appear to be perfectionistic. Perfectionism is when individuals have excessive and rigid goals regarding either self-accomplishments or excessive social expectations of themselves or others.
    Having high expectations is not necessarily maladaptive, but the self-punishment and fear of not meeting your own or other’s expectations can be.  Feeling like life is not worth living due to a failed interview or relationship can be an experience a perfectionist may encounter.  Perfectionism can lead to many disorders such as eating disorders, OCD, depression and social anxiety.  Several studies indicate that maladaptive perfectionism is associated with narcissism. A Millennial with caretakers who provide conditional love and have perfectionist tendencies can be prone to narcissism.
    In spite of the amount of perfectionism I’ve seen with Millennials, very few articles and research have focused on exploring the connection between Millennials and perfectionism. In general there are few resources on how to treat perfectionists in the therapy situation and that is one reason why I wrote my book on treating perfectionism.
    Some of the challenges I experience working with perfectionists is their reluctance to show weakness and desire to portray a positive image.  This can cause perfectionists to conceal their concerns.  Wanting to be the perfect patient, they may praise the therapist and avoid their true feelings.  In other circumstances, a perfectionist’s extreme personal standards may parallel his or her expectations of a therapist.  The therapist is destined to fall short and not be good enough. In therapy with them it is often fascinating to explore how the dynamics they experience with me often parallel intimate relationships and career issues.  This is a topic that I explore in more depth in my book.
    As therapists, supervisors and parents of Millennial perfectionists I believe we should strive to recognize their creativity and intelligence and help them hold on to their high goals, but be less punitive if they fall short and instead, help them accept themselves.
    http://www.springerpub.com/w/psychology/perfectionism-millennials-how-to-treat-perfectionism-in-therapy/
     
  4. Like
    Reza got a reaction from Zarla for a blog entry, For Those Who Are Perfectionistic...   
    A very important point for self-reflection. Has our youthful generation become overly conscious of ourselves, to a narcissistic degree of over self-importance? Is our demands for the ideal aesthetic, a customized and polished version of the individual, an obsession with ourselves as the ultimate adaptive social creature, leading us towards excess fragility and anxiety? Why this fixation and compulsion with making ourselves the perfect product?
    Why this excessive idealism towards manufactured goals, and this unhealthy self-shaming when we can't achieve it? In this modern age, it feels like the gap between potential and reality is getting narrower. What was once unobtainable seems to be possible, as development and mass culture trickles down into even depraved hands. In relatively egalitarian Western societies, the individual is led to believe they are the master of their own narrative, as self-declared protagonists in a self-directed story, with an endless assortment of tools, facades, symbolisms, lifestyles, expression mediums, representations, and smokescreens available. The competitiveness to get the image "just right" is enormous, and the pressures that we put on each other and ourselves is crazy.
    From an Islamic perspective, its in our nature to strive towards perfection, to become an ideal believer and human being, in the image of God's principles. It's natural to feel shame, guilt, and self-consciousness for our shortcomings and misdeeds, and a desire to conceal them (see discussions on veils in Islam). But the key difference is that Islam defines perfection as our base, God-created humanity, and not through the lens of trendy, built up illusions and enhancements, created by mankind as obfuscations. We were created perfect, and we must simply protect and uphold what's already in our natures. Our faces were born perfect, our speech was born perfect, our spirits were born perfect. No lifehacks, PR campaigns, plastic surgeries, role playing, focus grouping, or image building is necessary.
    Peace will be felt when we submit to the real creator of our blueprint, of who we really are, rather than painfully burdening ourselves by usurping that role, and manufacturing a quintessential "perfect human", only narrowly useful in this very relative and disposable age. Which is why I believe that narcissism, perfectionism, and the increased self-importance of people is a sign of weakening faith, psychological stress, and social decay, because it questions and replaces the true created perfection of humankind with an artificial and contrived fantasy, often to serve self-interest, commercial needs, or both. 
    In short, to Allah, we are perfect and normal as we already are. Leave the creation and shaping of man to him, we must simply live it as he has revealed. Do not put more pressure on yourself than necessary. There is no value in pushing and punishing yourself for failing to meet contrived standards of beauty, behavior, or accomplishment set by the media or whomever else. Love God unconditionally, love yourself as you are, and be yourself. Do not adhere to rigid orthodoxies or values that come from indifferent and corruptible sources. Do not set personal standards for yourself that are based on fantasy or an illusion. Don't let yourself believe you are deficient because you don't have the right trinkets or crack the perfect tooth smile at the camera. Any smile, with sincerity and goodwill, will be important and valued by those who matter. Believe in yourself.
     
    A brief excerpt from an academic paper on this issue of perfectionism among the millennial generation:
    Quote Perfectionism & Millennials: How to Treat Perfectionism in Therapy
    Posted on November 14, 2013 By Michael Brustein | 0 comments Posted in: Psychology, Social Work & Counseling TAGS: Therapy, Perfectionism, Millenial Generation, mental health Millennials are often described as entitled with unrealistic expectations regarding their career. They have been referred to as lazy, hyper image-conscious, narcissistic and depressed about a life of mediocrity.  Are the labels and negative stereotypes given to Millennials perpetuated by envious baby boomers? Possibly.  Nonetheless there is some research coinciding with the typical Millennial labels that are thought-provoking.  For example, the majority of middle school girls polled in 2007 would rather be an assistant to a celebrity than a senator or a CEO.  According to a study conducted in 2009 by the Institute of National Health, college students had a 58% increase in narcissism in comparison students assessed in 1982 (Time, 5/20/2013).
    I have seen a substantial portion of Millennial patients in my private practice.  My observation about Millennials is that some have narcissism, but they equally appear to be perfectionistic. Perfectionism is when individuals have excessive and rigid goals regarding either self-accomplishments or excessive social expectations of themselves or others.
    Having high expectations is not necessarily maladaptive, but the self-punishment and fear of not meeting your own or other’s expectations can be.  Feeling like life is not worth living due to a failed interview or relationship can be an experience a perfectionist may encounter.  Perfectionism can lead to many disorders such as eating disorders, OCD, depression and social anxiety.  Several studies indicate that maladaptive perfectionism is associated with narcissism. A Millennial with caretakers who provide conditional love and have perfectionist tendencies can be prone to narcissism.
    In spite of the amount of perfectionism I’ve seen with Millennials, very few articles and research have focused on exploring the connection between Millennials and perfectionism. In general there are few resources on how to treat perfectionists in the therapy situation and that is one reason why I wrote my book on treating perfectionism.
    Some of the challenges I experience working with perfectionists is their reluctance to show weakness and desire to portray a positive image.  This can cause perfectionists to conceal their concerns.  Wanting to be the perfect patient, they may praise the therapist and avoid their true feelings.  In other circumstances, a perfectionist’s extreme personal standards may parallel his or her expectations of a therapist.  The therapist is destined to fall short and not be good enough. In therapy with them it is often fascinating to explore how the dynamics they experience with me often parallel intimate relationships and career issues.  This is a topic that I explore in more depth in my book.
    As therapists, supervisors and parents of Millennial perfectionists I believe we should strive to recognize their creativity and intelligence and help them hold on to their high goals, but be less punitive if they fall short and instead, help them accept themselves.
    http://www.springerpub.com/w/psychology/perfectionism-millennials-how-to-treat-perfectionism-in-therapy/
     
  5. Like
    Reza got a reaction from CaptainGalaxy for a blog entry, For Those Who Are Perfectionistic...   
    A very important point for self-reflection. Has our youthful generation become overly conscious of ourselves, to a narcissistic degree of over self-importance? Is our demands for the ideal aesthetic, a customized and polished version of the individual, an obsession with ourselves as the ultimate adaptive social creature, leading us towards excess fragility and anxiety? Why this fixation and compulsion with making ourselves the perfect product?
    Why this excessive idealism towards manufactured goals, and this unhealthy self-shaming when we can't achieve it? In this modern age, it feels like the gap between potential and reality is getting narrower. What was once unobtainable seems to be possible, as development and mass culture trickles down into even depraved hands. In relatively egalitarian Western societies, the individual is led to believe they are the master of their own narrative, as self-declared protagonists in a self-directed story, with an endless assortment of tools, facades, symbolisms, lifestyles, expression mediums, representations, and smokescreens available. The competitiveness to get the image "just right" is enormous, and the pressures that we put on each other and ourselves is crazy.
    From an Islamic perspective, its in our nature to strive towards perfection, to become an ideal believer and human being, in the image of God's principles. It's natural to feel shame, guilt, and self-consciousness for our shortcomings and misdeeds, and a desire to conceal them (see discussions on veils in Islam). But the key difference is that Islam defines perfection as our base, God-created humanity, and not through the lens of trendy, built up illusions and enhancements, created by mankind as obfuscations. We were created perfect, and we must simply protect and uphold what's already in our natures. Our faces were born perfect, our speech was born perfect, our spirits were born perfect. No lifehacks, PR campaigns, plastic surgeries, role playing, focus grouping, or image building is necessary.
    Peace will be felt when we submit to the real creator of our blueprint, of who we really are, rather than painfully burdening ourselves by usurping that role, and manufacturing a quintessential "perfect human", only narrowly useful in this very relative and disposable age. Which is why I believe that narcissism, perfectionism, and the increased self-importance of people is a sign of weakening faith, psychological stress, and social decay, because it questions and replaces the true created perfection of humankind with an artificial and contrived fantasy, often to serve self-interest, commercial needs, or both. 
    In short, to Allah, we are perfect and normal as we already are. Leave the creation and shaping of man to him, we must simply live it as he has revealed. Do not put more pressure on yourself than necessary. There is no value in pushing and punishing yourself for failing to meet contrived standards of beauty, behavior, or accomplishment set by the media or whomever else. Love God unconditionally, love yourself as you are, and be yourself. Do not adhere to rigid orthodoxies or values that come from indifferent and corruptible sources. Do not set personal standards for yourself that are based on fantasy or an illusion. Don't let yourself believe you are deficient because you don't have the right trinkets or crack the perfect tooth smile at the camera. Any smile, with sincerity and goodwill, will be important and valued by those who matter. Believe in yourself.
     
    A brief excerpt from an academic paper on this issue of perfectionism among the millennial generation:
    Quote Perfectionism & Millennials: How to Treat Perfectionism in Therapy
    Posted on November 14, 2013 By Michael Brustein | 0 comments Posted in: Psychology, Social Work & Counseling TAGS: Therapy, Perfectionism, Millenial Generation, mental health Millennials are often described as entitled with unrealistic expectations regarding their career. They have been referred to as lazy, hyper image-conscious, narcissistic and depressed about a life of mediocrity.  Are the labels and negative stereotypes given to Millennials perpetuated by envious baby boomers? Possibly.  Nonetheless there is some research coinciding with the typical Millennial labels that are thought-provoking.  For example, the majority of middle school girls polled in 2007 would rather be an assistant to a celebrity than a senator or a CEO.  According to a study conducted in 2009 by the Institute of National Health, college students had a 58% increase in narcissism in comparison students assessed in 1982 (Time, 5/20/2013).
    I have seen a substantial portion of Millennial patients in my private practice.  My observation about Millennials is that some have narcissism, but they equally appear to be perfectionistic. Perfectionism is when individuals have excessive and rigid goals regarding either self-accomplishments or excessive social expectations of themselves or others.
    Having high expectations is not necessarily maladaptive, but the self-punishment and fear of not meeting your own or other’s expectations can be.  Feeling like life is not worth living due to a failed interview or relationship can be an experience a perfectionist may encounter.  Perfectionism can lead to many disorders such as eating disorders, OCD, depression and social anxiety.  Several studies indicate that maladaptive perfectionism is associated with narcissism. A Millennial with caretakers who provide conditional love and have perfectionist tendencies can be prone to narcissism.
    In spite of the amount of perfectionism I’ve seen with Millennials, very few articles and research have focused on exploring the connection between Millennials and perfectionism. In general there are few resources on how to treat perfectionists in the therapy situation and that is one reason why I wrote my book on treating perfectionism.
    Some of the challenges I experience working with perfectionists is their reluctance to show weakness and desire to portray a positive image.  This can cause perfectionists to conceal their concerns.  Wanting to be the perfect patient, they may praise the therapist and avoid their true feelings.  In other circumstances, a perfectionist’s extreme personal standards may parallel his or her expectations of a therapist.  The therapist is destined to fall short and not be good enough. In therapy with them it is often fascinating to explore how the dynamics they experience with me often parallel intimate relationships and career issues.  This is a topic that I explore in more depth in my book.
    As therapists, supervisors and parents of Millennial perfectionists I believe we should strive to recognize their creativity and intelligence and help them hold on to their high goals, but be less punitive if they fall short and instead, help them accept themselves.
    http://www.springerpub.com/w/psychology/perfectionism-millennials-how-to-treat-perfectionism-in-therapy/
     
  6. Like
    Reza reacted to repenter-gone4awhile for a blog entry, Week 1   
    General Info: 
    Body info:
    Height: 182cm Weight: 90kg
    Lifts max:
    Bench: 125kg max Deadlift: 180kg max Squat: 150kg max
    Nutrition structure:
    7 am Breakfast
    Protein shake > 60g protein, 10g BCAA, 14g of Glutamine, 110kcal Rice porridge(300g) > 10g protein, 36g carbs, 264kcal 4 egg omlette > 28g protein, 22g fat, 310kcal
    9 am Snack
    1 Banana > 27g carbs, 125kcal walnuts(150g) > 28g protein, 5g carbs, 102g fat, 1050kcal
    11 am Lunch
    Tuna in oil(100g) > 25g protein, 4g fat, 130kcal Protein shake > 60g protein, 10g BCAA, 14g of Glutamine, 110kcal Fullcorn bread(200g) > 36g protein, 42g carbs, 19g fat, 516kcal
    1 pm Snack
    1 Banana > 27g carbs, 125kcal walnuts(150g) > 28g protein, 5g carbs, 102g fat, 1050kcal
    4 pm pre workout
    1 large steak(250g) > 56g protein, 263kcal Rice wild(150g) > 12g protein, 109g carbs, 516kcal Broccoli(200) > 6.4g protein, 5g carbs, 60kcal
    Post workout
    Protein shake > 60g protein, 10g BCAA, 14g of Glutamine, 110kcal 1 Banana > 27g carbs, 125kcal walnuts(150g) > 28g protein, 5g carbs, 102g fat, 1050kcal
    6pm dinner
    1 large steak(250g) > 56g protein, 263kcal Rice wild(150g) > 12g protein, 109g carbs, 516kcal Broccoli(200) > 6.4g protein, 5g carbs, 60kcal 8 pm Snack
    1 Banana > 27g carbs, 125kcal walnuts(150g) > 28g protein, 5g carbs, 102g fat, 1050kcal 11 pm Night meal
    Rice porridge(300g) > 10g protein, 36g carbs, 264kcal 4 egg omlette > 28g protein, 22g fat, 310kcal Glutamine 5g, Creatine 10g, Multivitamines, 2 spoons of omega 3 and 6 oils  Total Values:
    Protein: 531.4g
    Carbs: 470g
    Fat: 400g
    Calories: 6500kcal

    Workout Routine:
    Morning before breakfast:
    250 crunches
    250 legraises

    Weightlifting around 5pm
    Day 1: Chest and Biceps Day 2: Shoulders and Traps Day 3: Upper back and Triceps Day 4: Rest Day 5: Lower back and legs Day 6: Triceps and Biceps Day 7: Repeat day 1 Structure:
    6 exercises on each body part mentioned, all in super sets. Meaning when you are done with exercise 1 you immediately do exercise 2. Except Bench-press, dead-lift and squats which are done in normal sets as they are core movements and needs fulls strength and focus. 
    Buildup for each exercise is split pyramid with 4 sets of 12/10/8/6 reps. The lower the rep the heaver the weight gets. 

    Example - Benchpress
    Set 1: 110kg 12 reps
    60 seconds break
    Set 2: 115kg 10 reps
    60 seconds break
    Set 3: 120kg 8 reps
    60 seconds break
    Set 4: 125kg 6 reps

    Example superset Biceps:
    Dumbell curls + Zbar curl
    Set 1: 6 reps DC 6 reps Zbar
    60 seconds break
    Set 2: 5 reps DC 5 reps Zbar
    60 seconds break
    Set 3: 4 reps DC 4 reps Zbar
    60 seconds break
    Set 4: 3 reps DC 3 reps Zbar


      
  7. Like
    Reza got a reaction from Sirius_Bright for a blog entry, For Those Who Are Deliberately Delaying Marriage..   
    I'm currently reading the online book "Youth and Spouse Selection". It was written in the 90s, primarily targeted towards youth in Iran (but has some relevance to youth everywhere). One particular story shared was quite eye opening:
     
     
    Full text of book here:
    http://www.al-islam.org/youth-and-spouse-selection-ali-akbar-mazaheri
     
  8. Like
    Reza got a reaction from yolanda313786 for a blog entry, For Those Who Are Deliberately Delaying Marriage..   
    I'm currently reading the online book "Youth and Spouse Selection". It was written in the 90s, primarily targeted towards youth in Iran (but has some relevance to youth everywhere). One particular story shared was quite eye opening:
     
     
    Full text of book here:
    http://www.al-islam.org/youth-and-spouse-selection-ali-akbar-mazaheri
     
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