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In the Name of God بسم الله

Hagop

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  1. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Golden-crowned in Rahbar's New Year Message   
    Khamenei Rahbar! Labbayk ya Khamenei!
    Nowruz Mobarak to all Iranians!
  2. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Gomnam in Rahbar's New Year Message   
    Khamenei Rahbar! Labbayk ya Khamenei!
    Nowruz Mobarak to all Iranians!
  3. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Aabiss_Shakari in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Wa alaykum salam Bro (adil452),
    Agree with you that some Sunnis love Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them) very much.
    However, simply put, I want to take my understanding of Islam from the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them). The Ahlul Bayt meaning specifically the Ahl al-Kisa, the people with the blood of the Prophet (SalAllahu Alayhi wa Alihi wa Sallam) flowing through their veins.
    I truly believe that the evidence points to the fact that the Ahlul Bayt have more rights over the Muslims than anyone else other than the Prophet of Allah (Peace be upon Him and His Family). They were denied their rights at Saqifa, over Fadak and the rebellion against Imam Ali (Peace be upon Him) was not a case of sincere ijtehad but motivated by the basest impulses of greed and deception. The afore-mentioned injustices led directly to the slaughter of Karbala.
    The head of Imam Hussein, the Prince of Martyrs (Peace be upon Him), whose mouth was kissed by the Best of Creation, Rahmatan lil 'Alamin (Peace be upon Him and His Family), was decapitated by an accursed man (Shimr) under the command of the accursed son (Umar bin Sa'ad) of a Sahabi and sent to the accursed tyrant Yazid (son of another Sahabi) in Damascus. What kind of Islam were these so called Sahaba, namely Saad ibn Abi Waqqas and Muawiyah bin Abi Sufyan, teaching their sons? Did these men learn nothing of mercy from the Mercy to the Creation (Peace be upon Him and His Family)?
    This is why I call myself a Shia.
    The Ahlul Bayt were human, that's true. They were, however, the purest of heart and overflowing with wisdom and knowledge. Those are the real super-human attributes that they possess. Unfortunately, the English word infallible doesn't really convey those attributes accurately in my opinion.
    Peace.
  4. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Aabiss_Shakari in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salaams Varun,
    At this stage of my journey to Allah, a massive spiritual opening for me is the Last Sermon of Lady Fatima Zahra (infinite Salaams be upon Her). So much to learn and understand from this. May Allah open it up for my full understanding.
    The Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them) are the milk of human goodness. Like their father, Rasulullah, Rahmatan lil Alamin, the Perfect Man (Peace be upon Him and His Family), they are the manifestation of the Quran in human form.
  5. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Aabiss_Shakari in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  6. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from ImAli in Why Should Lebanon Have Militias ?   
    Wow, an Iraqi Kurdish nationalist on this thread is arguing against Iranian interference in Lebanon! Pots and kettles spring to mind.
    Everyone knows that the Iraqi Kurdish political leadership receives covert support from Mossad (as documented by Seymour Hersh and others). Of course the Iraqi Kurdish leadership also urged the US not to withdraw their occupation forces.
    Massoud Barzani is simply a chip off the old block. His father ('Mullah' Mustafa Barzani) managed to work for (not just with) the KGB, CIA, MI6, Mossad and SAVAK at various points in his career. That's some stellar political promiscuity there!
    When people say that politics is a dirty business perhaps they should replace the word dirty with Barzani.
    Do the people who condemn Iranian and Syrian involvement in Lebanon also condemn Saudi and US support for mini-Hariri? There is no equivalence between US imperialism and the forces resisting it, namely the Islamic Republic and Hezbollah.
    Seyyed Nasrallah is not a 'tool' in the way that mini-Hariri is.
  7. My Prayers
    Hagop got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Musings Of A "sunni"   
    Salaams Propaganda_of_the_Deed,
    Just wanted to echo your thoughts on the idealism of Shiism versus the realism of Sunnism. It's interesting how the Shi'i theologians emphasise the Justice of God whilst the Sunni ones don't believe that anything is good or bad per se, i.e. they emphasise God's Command over His Justice.
    Like you, I find the former more compelling than the latter. FWIW, as a former Sunni I didn't find the 'technical' (e.g. style of prayer) adjustments difficult. To be honest, the finer points of doctrine and interpretation of history (the injustice of Saqifah, Aisha's role at the Battle of the Camel etc) all of these came to me easily once I'd established a loving, spiritual connection with the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them). A major part of this was reading the duas, especially of Imam Al Sajjad (as). Of course the impact of Imam Hussein (as) and the sacrifice of Kerbala was another major factor.
    I truly 'knew' that I was a Shia (or have to strive to be one) when listening to Dua Kumayl and the subsequent Ziyaraat of Imam Hussein (as) at a Shia mosque.
    Now I feel that I have tasted something of Pure Islam, the way of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family). I feel I have a better connection with Allah because I'm (trying) to hold onto His Rope (Peace be Upon Them).
    Good luck with your spiritual journey and may Allah fill it with His Barakah.
  8. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Ameen in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  9. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Khadim uz Zahra in Musings Of A "sunni"   
    Salaams Propaganda_of_the_Deed,
    Just wanted to echo your thoughts on the idealism of Shiism versus the realism of Sunnism. It's interesting how the Shi'i theologians emphasise the Justice of God whilst the Sunni ones don't believe that anything is good or bad per se, i.e. they emphasise God's Command over His Justice.
    Like you, I find the former more compelling than the latter. FWIW, as a former Sunni I didn't find the 'technical' (e.g. style of prayer) adjustments difficult. To be honest, the finer points of doctrine and interpretation of history (the injustice of Saqifah, Aisha's role at the Battle of the Camel etc) all of these came to me easily once I'd established a loving, spiritual connection with the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them). A major part of this was reading the duas, especially of Imam Al Sajjad (as). Of course the impact of Imam Hussein (as) and the sacrifice of Kerbala was another major factor.
    I truly 'knew' that I was a Shia (or have to strive to be one) when listening to Dua Kumayl and the subsequent Ziyaraat of Imam Hussein (as) at a Shia mosque.
    Now I feel that I have tasted something of Pure Islam, the way of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family). I feel I have a better connection with Allah because I'm (trying) to hold onto His Rope (Peace be Upon Them).
    Good luck with your spiritual journey and may Allah fill it with His Barakah.
  10. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from a believer in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  11. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Rasul in Musings Of A "sunni"   
    Salaams Propaganda_of_the_Deed,
    Just wanted to echo your thoughts on the idealism of Shiism versus the realism of Sunnism. It's interesting how the Shi'i theologians emphasise the Justice of God whilst the Sunni ones don't believe that anything is good or bad per se, i.e. they emphasise God's Command over His Justice.
    Like you, I find the former more compelling than the latter. FWIW, as a former Sunni I didn't find the 'technical' (e.g. style of prayer) adjustments difficult. To be honest, the finer points of doctrine and interpretation of history (the injustice of Saqifah, Aisha's role at the Battle of the Camel etc) all of these came to me easily once I'd established a loving, spiritual connection with the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them). A major part of this was reading the duas, especially of Imam Al Sajjad (as). Of course the impact of Imam Hussein (as) and the sacrifice of Kerbala was another major factor.
    I truly 'knew' that I was a Shia (or have to strive to be one) when listening to Dua Kumayl and the subsequent Ziyaraat of Imam Hussein (as) at a Shia mosque.
    Now I feel that I have tasted something of Pure Islam, the way of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family). I feel I have a better connection with Allah because I'm (trying) to hold onto His Rope (Peace be Upon Them).
    Good luck with your spiritual journey and may Allah fill it with His Barakah.
  12. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Rasul in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  13. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Hameedeh in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  14. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from md. ammar ali in Why Did You Become A Shia?   
    Salam wa Rahmatullah,
    So mother asked me why I decided to become a Shia. "Why not just stay Sunni and keep loving the Ahlul Bayt (Peace be upon Them)?", she asked.
    There were so many reasons that I wanted to give but, in the end, the only reply that came out instinctively was: "Because I can't (and won't) 'get over' what happened at Karbala. I can't make excuses for the murderers of the Prophet's own blood (Peace be upon Him and His Family)."
    Arguably, if there were no Shias to mourn Imam Hussein (as) then Kerbala would have been scrubbed from the annals of history. Perhaps even mention of the Ahul Bayt (as) would be removed from the namaz. Allahu alim.
    All this said I'm still pro-unity with Sunnis. After all, my parents are Sunni. Imam Hussein (as) died to preserve the religion of Allah for the benefit of the Ummah as a whole (even if some don't understand this).
    Remember that when Al Quds was first captured by the Crusaders in 1099, the defenders of the garrison were Shias and Sunnis. At that time Al Quds was under the rule of Fatimid Egypt. The Crusaders who massacred the inhabitants and defenders were not interested in who was Shi'i or Sunni. They killed what they saw as Muslim 'heathens'.
    Ya Allah, may I never forget Kerbala and may I draw the right lessons from the sacrifice of the blood of the Prophet (Peace be upon Him and His Family).
    Allahumma salli ala Muhammadin wa Ale Muhammad.
  15. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Baseeji- in Wahdat Al-mawjud   
    Salaams
    I apologise in advance for any repetition of what others have said in defence of the (oft-misunderstood) concept of Wahdat al Wujud.
    Pantheism holds that All is God, that the universe (a created thing) and the divine (the Creator) are identical. Wahdat al Wujud IS NOT this.
    On the highest level, Wujud (being) is the absolute and non delimited reality of God, the "Necessary Being" (Wajib al Wujud) that cannot not exist. In this sense, wujud designates the Essence (Dhat) of God or of the Real (Al Haqq), the only reality that is real in every respect.
    For creatures (makhluq), Being is not part of their essence because a creature does not own its being, it can never be independent in and of itself. In this sense, the created does not deserve the attribution of Being. Only God is Being, and all the rest is in reality a possibility, a relative, possible non-existence.
    Ultimately, what Ibn Arabi is saying is the following: Only He who possesses Being in Himself and whose Being is His very essence, merits the name of Being. Only God can be like that.
    Wahdat al Wujud is Tawheed (or the understanding of) at its purest.
    Peace.
  16. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Propaganda_of_the_Deed in Notes On The Syrian Uprising.   
    Salaams,
    I'm not 'for' Bashar or the Assad clan btw.
    I did actually say (to quote myself): "The Assad regime is guilty of crimes and does need reform but if anyone thinks that the Syrian people (especially women and religious minorities) are going to be emancipated by Saudi and Qatari proxies, then they're in for a major (and possibly bloodier) disappointment."
    I repeat my first paragraph: "The question in my mind is how one can look at an armed group which has the backing of Saudi Arabia and Qatar, as a force that's going to bring democracy? I mean they're run on utterly feudal lines. These are the vanguards of democratic revolution in Syria and the Middle East? I don't think so."
    I don't see much democracy in Libya at the moment. Instead you've got a weak central government, a plethora of armed gangs and lack of security for ordinary citizens. With Syria's sectarian mix you could, potentially, be looking at a long running civil war. I hope for the sake of the Syrian people that doesn't happen.
    Not every member of the Free Syrian Army is an extremist Salafi but you only need a few heavily armed units to wreak major havoc. I hope Bashar and his clan step down but don't want to see the victory of the Free Syrian Army.
    In the same way that the Shabiha are guilty of murdering innocent civilians, the FSA also has innocent blood on its hands. Who was the imam of Anas bin Malek mosque oppressing? Did he deserve to die for taking a political position against the uprising? Hardly bodes well for democracy. Ordinary Alawite and Christian civilians have been killed by the opposition. There are just too many foreign journalists confirming this for it to be dismissed as regime propaganda. Not every Alawite or Christian works for the Assad regime.
  17. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from lover of Mola in Ayatallah Bahjat Praying   
    Salaams,
    Thank you for that. So beautiful and moving mash'Allah.
    May Allah grant Ayatollah Bahjat Firdaws.
  18. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Naz_ in Ayatallah Bahjat Praying   
    Salaams,
    Thank you for that. So beautiful and moving mash'Allah.
    May Allah grant Ayatollah Bahjat Firdaws.
  19. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from 000 in Ring Of Iranian Bases Threatens America   
    Source: http://www.juancole....reatens-us.html
  20. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from ishq ast abul fazl in Ayatallah Bahjat Praying   
    Salaams,
    Thank you for that. So beautiful and moving mash'Allah.
    May Allah grant Ayatollah Bahjat Firdaws.
  21. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Khadim uz Zahra in Is The Buddha Considered A Prophet?   
    Salaams silencewithin,
    Firstly, I think you should understand that Muslim scholars and laymen disagree on many issues, both those pertaining to within Islam and without.
    I think it's fair to say, as evidenced by this thread, that there is some disagreement as to whether or not Buddha was a prophet. Personally speaking, I share titumir's view that: "Buddha's life indicates a great probability of him being a Prophet. Because, he was a prince who left his comfortable lifestyle to live among the common people and preach to them."
    Perhaps the following book may go some way towards answering your question: Common ground between Islam & Buddhism by Reza Shah-Kazemi, Hamza Yusuf and the Dalai Lama
    Whilst this is not the definitive Islamic answer, it does present the views of a well regarded (in academic circles certainly) Twelver Shia academic, Dr Reza Shah-Kazemi, a renowned traditional Sunni scholar, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf, and the Dalai Lama (who argues that Islam is indeed a salvific path). In addition, the book contains an argument by Professor Muhammed Hashim Kamali, a Sunni scholar of religious law, that Buddhism is an authentic religion.
    However, for the sake of balance, I must say that leading Twelver Shia scholars such as Grand Ayatollah Sayyid Ali al Husayni al Sistani and traditional Sunni scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller would disagree with the arguments presented in this work.
    I hope this helps.
    Peace
  22. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Saintly_Jinn23 in The Safaviyyah   
    Salaams,
    If you want a good over-view of Safavid history and culture from an academic perspective, then I highly recommend Iran Under the Safavids by Roger Savory, an Iranologist and specialist on the Safavids (currently Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto).
    Here's an Amazon link to it: http://www.amazon.com/Iran-Under-Safavids-Roger-Savory/dp/0521042518
    It's a period of history that's relatively neglected by academia, certainly when compared to the Ottoman Empire.
    Peace.
  23. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from Ruq in Anyone With Personal Experience Of Shi'i Tariqas?   
    Yes and Salaams to you as well.
    Actually there are Shia tariqas, like the ones I mentioned in my original post. If you don't know about them or disapprove of the concept, then please don't involve yourself in this thread.
    Thanks in advance.
  24. Like
    Hagop got a reaction from beardedbaker in Wahdat Al-mawjud   
    Salaams
    I apologise in advance for any repetition of what others have said in defence of the (oft-misunderstood) concept of Wahdat al Wujud.
    Pantheism holds that All is God, that the universe (a created thing) and the divine (the Creator) are identical. Wahdat al Wujud IS NOT this.
    On the highest level, Wujud (being) is the absolute and non delimited reality of God, the "Necessary Being" (Wajib al Wujud) that cannot not exist. In this sense, wujud designates the Essence (Dhat) of God or of the Real (Al Haqq), the only reality that is real in every respect.
    For creatures (makhluq), Being is not part of their essence because a creature does not own its being, it can never be independent in and of itself. In this sense, the created does not deserve the attribution of Being. Only God is Being, and all the rest is in reality a possibility, a relative, possible non-existence.
    Ultimately, what Ibn Arabi is saying is the following: Only He who possesses Being in Himself and whose Being is His very essence, merits the name of Being. Only God can be like that.
    Wahdat al Wujud is Tawheed (or the understanding of) at its purest.
    Peace.
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