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In the Name of God بسم الله

Khadim uz Zahra

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  1. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Northwest in Abrogation   
    (bismillah)
     
    (salam)
     
     
     
    Well, the verse mentions causing a verse to be forgotten so one can assume that, perhaps, there were certain verses that were revealed but God made the Muslims forget them and, as such, they are, perhaps, no longer found in the Qur'an. We cannot, however, assume that all such verses are no longer in the Qur'an. For one, the verse mentions forgotten verses AND abrogation, which would indicate that abrogation is when verses are not forgotten. This, however, is still not very explicit and it can be argued that this interpretation is rather ambiguous.
     
    The second and more definitive proof is the fact that we actually have verses which were abrogated in the Qur'an and some of these verses are such that almost all the scholars agree upon them. For example, the verses about drinking liquor. It is widely known among the Muslims that before the arrival of the Prophet, drinking alcohol was commonplace among the Arabs and that the Prophet prohibited in stages. First, 2:219 was revealed that mentioned that alcohol had benefits and harms and that the harms of alcohol were more than the benefits. Then, the verse was revealed that said that one should not pray while intoxicated (4:43). Finally, there was an order of absolute prohibition with 5:90-91 declaring it Shaitan's work. Now, most scholars argue that these three verses, in that order, abrogated the previous one with 5:90-91 being the final and, thus, the abrogator of the other two and the one in effect today.
     
    As a side note, none of these actually mention that alcohol is haram so some argue that alcohol is only discouraged, while other argue that the very first verse, since it mentioned the harm being greater than the gain, is proof of prohibition and, thus, there is no abrogation; it is just further explanation and auxiliary details. You can read about the abrogation explanation here and an article with someone arguing that it was always prohibited here.
     
    So, yes, the view of most scholars (I don't want to say all because I really am not that learned so I'm being cautious) is that the abrogated (cancelled) verses are also found in the Qur'an. Of course, as a result of this, there is a need for rigorous examination of the verses and their context, as you have mentioned.
     
    Trivia:
    In Arabic, the scholars of the Qur'anic sciences refer to the original, cancelled verse as the mansukh and the new verse which cancels it is called the nasikh. Abrogation itself is naskh.
  2. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Northwest in Abrogation   
    (BISMILLAH)
     
    (Salam)
     
     
     
    Well, what is a good explanation depends on where you're coming from. If you're a modernist, then this is exactly what you'd be looking for: allowing Islam and the Shari'a to change depending on the circumstances. Indeed, many of the 'reformist' scholars tout differing theories about abrogation as proof of their belief that the rules of Islam, as they were revealed during the time of the Prophet, may not all be applicable today.
     
    Abrogation in general is, however, even supported by the most conservative of scholars, too. It is almost an accepted belief, with only a few (at least among the conservatives) ever challenging the paradigm. While, yes, one can make an argument that the Prophet was playing with the rules, as you put it, I think even the staunchest of Christians will have to admit that there is some merit to the idea of abrogation - at least, if he's being honest. One way of justifying it can be to take the second meaning you alluded to itself. Almost all Christians believe that Jesus' arrival abrogated the previous Mosaic commands and all Muslims believe that the Qur'an abrogates the Shari'as of previous Prophets. This, in itself, is proof that changing circumstances can necessitate a change in Divine Commandments. Yes, in the previous cases the changes took place over long periods of time but, once the principle is established, one can easily make the argument that large changes can also take place in a short span of time and, as such, would also require the appropriate legal modifications.
     
    Secondly, the revelation of the Qur'an, unlike the revelation of, say, the Ten Commandments, wasn't all at once. While the fact that revelation to Moses was spontaneous and only happened once can help us understand that they were absolute rules (because, otherwise there would be subsequent revelations, as and when required), the Qur'an was often revealed as a response to a certain event or happening during the time of the Prophet and, as such, while one verse may be giving a general rule for eternity, other verses may only be referring to a specific incident only and to take that and paint it everywhere would be sheer madness. As such, while one situation required a specific set of rules, a change in the situation would have meant that the previous rule was either no longer needed or was, in fact, harmful and, thus, required a change in the Divine Law.
  3. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Diaz in Divorcing infertile husband   
    Yes. If a man said his wife couldn't get a child but she was amazing and truly loved him, I'd also recommend he not divorce her and try and adopt.
  4. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra reacted to Abu Hadi in I am becoming more jealous of my best friend and its eating me up   
    Imam Sadiq((عليه السلام)) had a very interesting hadith when it comes to this subject. Basically the hadith is saying that you will compare yourself to other people, this is natural. You can't really not do this. He said that when you do this, 'Look down, don't look up' as far as things related to the dunya (money, status, reputation, etc). Look at people who have less than you, in terms of money, status, reputation and you will be thankful to Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) and feel good and grateful that He(s.w.a) has given you so much. If you are constantly 'Looking up' you will always feel jelousy and dissatisfaction and eventually you will feel unsatisfied with what Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has given you. This feeling of not being satisfied with what Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has given you is the root of many types of sins and haram. As far as non dunya related stuff (ibadat, good deeds) you should 'look up' so that you will motivate yourself to do more in this regard. 
    It says in the Holy Quran
    وَلَا تَمُدَّنَّ عَيْنَيْكَ إِلَى مَا مَتَّعْنَا بِهِ أَزْوَاجًا مِّنْهُمْ زَهْرَةَ الْحَيَاةِ الدُّنيَا لِنَفْتِنَهُمْ فِيهِ وَرِزْقُ رَبِّكَ خَيْرٌ وَأَبْقَى
    And do not extend your eyes toward that by which We have given enjoyment to [some] categories of them, [its being but] the splendor of worldly life by which We test them. And the provision of your Lord is better and more enduring.
    Sura TaHa, 131
    'Extend your eyes' means to 'Look up' and what some people are given in the dunya.
    There is another important things that you need to understand which usually only is understood by older people who have seen this happen before their eyes, more than once. It's that when you look at another person, you are only looking at a very thin slice of their life, in terms of actual events and time. If you only looked at a celebrity onstage when they were giving their acceptance speech for an award, you would think they have the perfect life. What you don't see is all the things they gave up in order to get that award. They may be disconnected from their family, have a horrible temper which makes people afraid of them, addicted to drugs, etc. They can 'keep it together' when they are onstage but when they are offstage they fall apart. There are many people like that. I am not saying your friend is like that, I don't know her, but I have seen many people who apparently have perfect lives, but when, by chance, 'the curtain is pulled back' and you see how their real life is, you begin to thank Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) that you have your life and not theirs, despite all your problems. Also time changes everything. Someone who is in a great situation one day might be in a horrible situation the next day and need your help. Then they next day they might be able to help you. This is how life is. 
    The other thing is that Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has created this world with people who have a diverse range of talents. All these are necessary for the world to function. You may not have a talent for public speaking in front of large groups, but that doesn't mean you are weak. I will use myself as an example. Say I have a talent for public speaking, and I can get in front of a crowd and give a great speech, no problem. Afterwards, people are saying 'MashahAllah, what a nice speech, etc'. But when I get home to my family, everyone is jealous of me, mocks me to my face and behind my back. They do gheeba on me and slander me. So maybe I can give a good speech, and maybe, in public, people think I have a great family situation because my family presents themselves to the community that way, but behind the scenes my homelife is a living hell because of all the jelously, backbiting, and slander which I feel like I am powerless to change, despite my apparent courage when I get in front of a group of people. I am not saying that is my real life, I'm just using it as an example. So my talent is public speaking. My test is dealing with my private family issues. If I use my talent in the right way, and am patient with my test, then Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) will reward me. If I use my talent in the wrong way and am not patient with my test, Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) will punish me. Everyone is in the same boat. We have talents and challenges that we deal with. You might see the talents, you might not see the challenges. That does not mean they are not there. Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) has given every human beings a set of talents by which they can earn a living / improve their life situation. He has also given every human beings challenges to deal with in life. Islam teaching us how to strengthen and preserve our talents and deal with the challenges in life. 
  5. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Lebanese313 in Divorcing infertile husband   
    I don't understand why you'd rather divorce your husband - who seems to be an incredibly awesome stand-up guy given that he's even willing to divorce you to make you happy - instead of just adopting a baby. Why do you need to have a biological child? I personally cannot see the reasoning behind leaving behind a man who truly understands and loves you for the sake of having a child when adoption is a completely viable option. Could you perhaps share why the two of you don't want to adopt?
  6. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Haji 2003 in Divorcing infertile husband   
    I don't understand why you'd rather divorce your husband - who seems to be an incredibly awesome stand-up guy given that he's even willing to divorce you to make you happy - instead of just adopting a baby. Why do you need to have a biological child? I personally cannot see the reasoning behind leaving behind a man who truly understands and loves you for the sake of having a child when adoption is a completely viable option. Could you perhaps share why the two of you don't want to adopt?
  7. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Haydar Husayn in Divorcing infertile husband   
    May I ask exactly what his concerns are with regard to adopted children growing older?
    If the issue is about issues related to being mahram, then a very simple solution is for you to adopt a very young baby, who is male. This way your husband will have no problems with being his mahram, while you may breastfeed the child to become his mahram. While I wasn't sure about this, a quick Google search reveals that a woman may stimulate lactation artificially without pregnancy through the use of hormonal therapy. From what I know, as per Islamic fiqh, you only need to breastfeed a baby once to become his mahram. Of course, I would suggest you consider an Islamic scholar in order to properly vet if such a thing is allowed, and if there's no problem with stimulating lactation artificially.
    If your concerns relate to the how the adopted child might react, after they grow up, to the fact that they were adopted, I don't think anyone can foretell what that experience might be like but if you raise him well, and with love, I don't imagine he would hold it against you.
    As Brother Hadi said, if your husband is compatible with you, I really don't think you should divorce him. Moreover, put yourself in his shoes. What if you were the infertile one among the two of you, would you not feel betrayed and dejected that your partner of 13 years is willing to just leave you behind after being together for so long?
    Ultimately, as brother Hadi said, you have to react to the hardships in your life as best as you can. If you have an alternative, such as adoption that allows you to both get the children you want, and be with the man you love, then why not take it, instead of being bogged down with potential problems in the future that may or may not ever occur? It would be truly unfortunate if you choose to live in misery from your fear of future problems, instead of making the right decisions in your present that are certain to make your lives better.
  8. Completely Agree
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from AliTanjiro in Divorcing infertile husband   
    I don't understand why you'd rather divorce your husband - who seems to be an incredibly awesome stand-up guy given that he's even willing to divorce you to make you happy - instead of just adopting a baby. Why do you need to have a biological child? I personally cannot see the reasoning behind leaving behind a man who truly understands and loves you for the sake of having a child when adoption is a completely viable option. Could you perhaps share why the two of you don't want to adopt?
  9. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Mariam17 in Divorcing infertile husband   
    May I ask exactly what his concerns are with regard to adopted children growing older?
    If the issue is about issues related to being mahram, then a very simple solution is for you to adopt a very young baby, who is male. This way your husband will have no problems with being his mahram, while you may breastfeed the child to become his mahram. While I wasn't sure about this, a quick Google search reveals that a woman may stimulate lactation artificially without pregnancy through the use of hormonal therapy. From what I know, as per Islamic fiqh, you only need to breastfeed a baby once to become his mahram. Of course, I would suggest you consider an Islamic scholar in order to properly vet if such a thing is allowed, and if there's no problem with stimulating lactation artificially.
    If your concerns relate to the how the adopted child might react, after they grow up, to the fact that they were adopted, I don't think anyone can foretell what that experience might be like but if you raise him well, and with love, I don't imagine he would hold it against you.
    As Brother Hadi said, if your husband is compatible with you, I really don't think you should divorce him. Moreover, put yourself in his shoes. What if you were the infertile one among the two of you, would you not feel betrayed and dejected that your partner of 13 years is willing to just leave you behind after being together for so long?
    Ultimately, as brother Hadi said, you have to react to the hardships in your life as best as you can. If you have an alternative, such as adoption that allows you to both get the children you want, and be with the man you love, then why not take it, instead of being bogged down with potential problems in the future that may or may not ever occur? It would be truly unfortunate if you choose to live in misery from your fear of future problems, instead of making the right decisions in your present that are certain to make your lives better.
  10. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Mariam17 in Divorcing infertile husband   
    I don't understand why you'd rather divorce your husband - who seems to be an incredibly awesome stand-up guy given that he's even willing to divorce you to make you happy - instead of just adopting a baby. Why do you need to have a biological child? I personally cannot see the reasoning behind leaving behind a man who truly understands and loves you for the sake of having a child when adoption is a completely viable option. Could you perhaps share why the two of you don't want to adopt?
  11. Thanks
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Hameedeh in Help me choose a new smartphone   
    Huawei and Xiaomi phones are pretty good, but they'll be hard for notme to get since she's in the US and both companies don't have a big presence there.
  12. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Hameedeh in Help me choose a new smartphone   
    What's your budget? You don't want something expensive, but you do still have to give a dollar amount in order for us to make suggestions because phones range from $50 to $1500 these days.
  13. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from ShiaChat Mod in Help me choose a new smartphone   
    Huawei and Xiaomi phones are pretty good, but they'll be hard for notme to get since she's in the US and both companies don't have a big presence there.
  14. Like
  15. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Zaidism in Abu Bakr's Greed.   
    In The Name of Allah ÓÈÍÇäå æÊÚÇáì, The Most Beneficent, The Most Merciful.
    The point of Brother Jebreil is quite good, you know. After all, whether there were any tensions between Ahlulbayt (peace be upon them all) and the Caliphs or not, whether Imam Ali (as) was really made the successor of the Prophet (pbuh) and others are historical questions and they are not so easy to decipher as physical facts are for which you only need a microscope and lo and behold! You have discovered the truth. History is not that simple so you cannot argue that just because the Sunnis (or the Shias) cannot make the other side accept that their belief is the truth, there is a problem in the ideology itself. Sure, it could be the case but this is not always so. If you argue in this manner, I could as well say that you being a Deistic-Agnostic (a new word I have coined for you because your position is quite blurry to me), why is it that you are not able to prove to others that God does not exist or, if He does, He does not take an active part in this Universe? Surely, your beliefs are also not reasonably true because, according to you, the criteria for something to be true is that "Something reasonably true shouldnt have such mass disagreement." But then, there is a lot of disagreement about your beliefs would you then leave your beliefs because there is so much disagreement about it?
    We must realise that sociological and theological issues are not as crystal clear as science such that all I need to do is "just take a microscope and stick it in someones face and say "see, now you know its true and you cant argue it"". It is, obviously, not so simple. Also, when we are talking about theological issues, then there is the added element of pride and obstinacy. When it comes to, say, the Sunni Shia dispute, many (including SHIAS) are very arrogant and even if they are given a really good arguement, they just don't accept it and then, of course, there is the "Allahu Aa'lam" (God knows the best or something along these lines) phenomenon in many Muslim circles where they just don't accept anything when they are cornered! They just say these words and try to avoid the questions by indicating that we either can't judge their intentions or it is not clear or, in one way or another, try to avoid.
    So, when it comes to theological, I don't really understand how you would want no disagreement when you, being an intellectual man, know the people possess great amount of pride and arrogance when it comes to issues of faith. Religion is not science!
    INSHALLAH, I have been helpful, clear and objective in my reasoning and have not hurt anyone. :)
    May Allah (SWT) bless us all, our families and loved ones, may He guide us all to The Straight Path with His Perfect Guidance and may He, The Forgiver of Sins and The Oft-Forgiving, forgive all our sins for, indeed, there is neither any refuge nor any respite for the sinners except in Allah ÓÈÍÇäå æÊÚÇáì.
  16. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from confusedandannoyed in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  17. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Zaidism in Afterlife for Animals   

    There are a few problems with the first premise. For one, like someone pointed out above, our other narrations clearly state that animals have no intellect. Thus, 'suffering' seems to be an irrelevant concept. If it's physical pain we're talking about, then, will plants, too, be resurrected? What of the crops that we so mercilessly 'kill' by ripping them out of the ground.
    Secondly, ressuection does not necessarily precede judgement. They could be resurrected, for some reason, but not go through the same procedures that humans will have to go through. We have numerous Hadith that talk about our hands, the Qur'an and a whole host of inanimate entities that God will make animate (whether literally or metaphorically I don't know but, let's assume literally for now) to bear witness. Will they, too, go under some kind of trial? Of course not. Thus, even if the verse is taken literally, we don't necessarily have any evidence that they will be punished or rewarded for their time on Earth.
  18. Completely Agree
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Ibn Al-Shahid in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  19. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Ali.Isa in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  20. Completely Agree
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Abu Nur in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  21. Completely Agree
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from amethyst_b in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  22. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra reacted to .InshAllah. in Mutah and sexual morals   
    Murder resembles lawful killing in many ways.  Intention is important and can mean the difference between good and evil , eventhough outwardly things look similar.  If we think there isnt much difference between zina and muta its because we underestimate and undervalue the importance of remembering Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) and/or following His commandments when performing actions.
  23. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra reacted to SoRoUsH in Mutah and sexual morals   
    As I've stated before, our problem is that we're looking at Muta'a through a non-Shia (mostly Catholic) perspective. 
    There's this incorrect, yet strongly held, belief that we ought to always combat the desires of the flesh. The incorrect non-Islamic belief of flesh-versus-spirit is prevalent in Muslim cultures, which has its source in Pagan/Manichean Dualism, picked up and propagated by the Catholic Church. 
    Islam is not a monastic religion. We see our desires of the flesh as the blessings of Allah that guide us towards our bodily needs, and we ought to fulfill the needs of our bodies to be mentally and spiritually healthy. 
    Sexual lust and desires signal a physical need, like how hunger signals a need. Just like how there are very clear precepts on what to eat and when, there are clear rules on how to quench our sexual desires. We eat and we have sex to strengthen our spirits. 
    Young men and adolescents go through a surge of hormonal activities related to sexual activities. These activities need to be addressed and appropriately dealt with. To tell a young man to ignore them or fight them is ... Stupid! It'll only lead to illegal sexual activities, such as masturbation and sex without a contract. 
    Instead of making young men and women feel ashamed about their natural feelings and desires, we ought to teach them about the blessings of Allah and how He has provided legal means for them to address their sexual needs. There's absolutely nothing embarassing or shameful about Muta'a.
    And if we were not influenced by Catholicism and Sunnism, we would not be having this discussion today or have such a hard problem with Muta'a. 
    Muta'a like Nikah like Salat like Hajj can be misused by hypocrites and liars. However, that doesn't imply that the practice of Muta'a or Salat is the problem. 
    Honestly, I really feel we need to grow up and have a mature view of sex and sexual activities. It's permitted for people to have sex with multiple people in their lifetime as long as they follow the rules, and there's absolutely nothing shameful or impious about it. 
  24. Completely Agree
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
  25. Like
    Khadim uz Zahra got a reaction from Moalfas in Ruqyah, jinn, and autism   
    Autism is not a form of jinn possession and claiming otherwise is, frankly, insulting to those who have the condition.
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