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In the Name of God بسم الله

SlaveOfAllah14

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  1. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Zainuu in Hazara Massacre   
    Inna Lillahe wa Inna Ilaihe Rajeoon.
    May Allah protect them!!
    May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) be the helper and grant them the best place in Jannah. 
    May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) strengthen the hearts of these sisters and provide them with immense patience and courage.
  2. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to starlight in Hazara Massacre   
    This is heartbreaking...
    'if someone wants to visualize Karbala he should look at my family. There are no male family members left behind to even carry out the funeral and burial so we sisters have decided to bury our relatives ourselves' - Masooma Yaqoob Ali
    https://www.bbc.com/urdu/pakistan-55529380.amp
    معصومہ کا بھائی چھ بہنوں کے اکلوتے بھائی اور دو بچوں کے والد تھے۔ جبکہ ان کے دیگر ہلاک ہونے والے رشتہ داروں میں اٹھارہ سالہ بھانجا احمد شاہ، دو ماموں 20 سالہ شیر محمد اور 30 سالہ محمد انوار اور ان کی خالہ کا بیٹا محمد احسن شامل ہیں
    ’اگر کسی کو کربلا کا منظر دیکھنا ہے تو وہ میرے خاندان کو دیکھ لے۔ ہمارے خاندان میں جنازہ اٹھانے والا کوئی مرد نہیں بچا۔ جس کے بعد ہم چھ بہنوں نے فیصلہ کیا ہے کہ ہم اپنے بھائی اور اپنے رشتہ داروں کے جنازے خود اٹھائیں گے۔‘
    Masooma's brother was the only son of his parents. He left behind old parents, a widow, two little children and six sisters. His 18 yr old nephew, two maternal uncles, and a cousin were also killed in the incident. 
  3. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to starlight in Hazara Massacre   
    Eleven Shia Hazara mine workers butchered in Balochistan.


  4. Partially Agree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from hasanhh in Hazara Massacre   
    Arguing with you guys are futile because none of you are Afghans to know the history and current dangerous situation of shias in Afghanistan.
    It's like a shia Iraqi instead of fighting ISIS in Iraq goes to Palestine and wages jidad against Israel because it is for a "more important cause". 
  5. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Zainuu in Hazara Massacre   
    Not a month goes by, where a massacre doesn't happen on a Hazara village in Afghanistan.
    Only a few days ago, Taliban started rampaging a Hazara Village, killing 50+ including women and children and taking 50+ women and girls as sex slaves. The village and around 150 families are still under captive.
    Yet our 40,000+ Hazara Fatimiyoon Brigade fighters are busy defending Bashar Al-Assad because of Iranian money and propaganda.
    http://www.tolonews.com/afghanistan/mirza-olang-village-victims’-families-ask-justice
     
  6. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Justsomeone in Hazara Massacre   
    Not a month goes by, where a massacre doesn't happen on a Hazara village in Afghanistan.
    Only a few days ago, Taliban started rampaging a Hazara Village, killing 50+ including women and children and taking 50+ women and girls as sex slaves. The village and around 150 families are still under captive.
    Yet our 40,000+ Hazara Fatimiyoon Brigade fighters are busy defending Bashar Al-Assad because of Iranian money and propaganda.
    http://www.tolonews.com/afghanistan/mirza-olang-village-victims’-families-ask-justice
     
  7. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Abu Hadi in Women approaching men for marriage. Thoughts?   
    There is nothing wrong with it. A simple proof is that Sayyid Khadijah((عليه السلام)) approached Rasoulallah(p.b.u.h) thru her cousin who brought the proposal. The main reason women don't do it is not because there is anything wrong with it, Islamically, if done in the right way and with the proper intention. They don't do it because they are afraid of rejection. Most brothers I know, including myself, have been rejected more than once for marriage in our journey to ultimately find a wife. It is difficult to deal with, emotionally, and especially if you are rejected with bad aklaq / publically, and there is always a risk of that since there are many sisters (unfortunately) who are immature and have bad aklaq and are severely lacking in empathy. This is most common amoung the younger sisters, and especially those who come from upper middle class / wealthy families. I think if sisters had to go thru this, at least once, maybe it would build some empathy in them for what their brothers have to face. 
    That's why I always advise brothers, and this would apply to sisters as well, 'Send the proposal, make your intention clear, and ask directly before you get involved emotionally'. If you get turned down, cross this person off this list (for marriage), and move on to the next. Most brothers and sisters unfortunately do it the opposite way. They talk, chat, flirt, for months or sometimes years, get heavily emotionally invested, then after all that, they directly get to the question and then (some of the time) find out that the other person didn't have that intention at all and they were just playing around. That is so devastating that many never recover, emotionally and psychologically. 
  8. Disagree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from HusseinAbbas in Punishment For Adultery/fornication   
    First of all, why did you post ur post twice lol? Please edit it. 
     
     
    Well did you know that the punishment of a (female) adulterer as said in the Quran is to lock them in a house until they die? ie. starve them to death.
     
    “Those who commit unlawful sexual intercourse of your women – bring against them four [witnesses] from among you. And if they testify, confine the guilty women to houses until death takes them or Allah ordains for them [another] way”. Quran 4:15
     
    Which one do you think would appear worse? But nevertheless, we muslims follow Allah (SWT) and his prophet. The prophet (p) replaced the punishment with stoning them to death. And thus we will stick to that. 
  9. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Diaz in Things That You Want In The Afterlife/heaven.   
    Heaven is a place where there is no worries, regrets, sorrows, stress, depression, anxiety. It is rather a place of eternal tranquility, calmness, serenity, beauty and peace. 
     
    Thus maybe I won't want anything. Maybe I'll just be thanking and praising Allah (aj) continuously for ever and ever for letting me be there. 
  10. Partially Agree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Revert1963 in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    I'd even go as far as saying that in the future the reverts should have their own mosques where they can make the decisions and where the youth from cultural backgrounds can also comfortably join. Current mosques are very cultural and they don't give the authority to others where positive changes which are needed can be implemented. 
  11. Disagree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Mohammed-Mehdi in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    I'd even go as far as saying that in the future the reverts should have their own mosques where they can make the decisions and where the youth from cultural backgrounds can also comfortably join. Current mosques are very cultural and they don't give the authority to others where positive changes which are needed can be implemented. 
  12. Completely Agree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from tri-star in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    I'd even go as far as saying that in the future the reverts should have their own mosques where they can make the decisions and where the youth from cultural backgrounds can also comfortably join. Current mosques are very cultural and they don't give the authority to others where positive changes which are needed can be implemented. 
  13. My Prayers
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    I'd even go as far as saying that in the future the reverts should have their own mosques where they can make the decisions and where the youth from cultural backgrounds can also comfortably join. Current mosques are very cultural and they don't give the authority to others where positive changes which are needed can be implemented. 
  14. Completely Agree
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Gaius I. Caesar in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    I'd even go as far as saying that in the future the reverts should have their own mosques where they can make the decisions and where the youth from cultural backgrounds can also comfortably join. Current mosques are very cultural and they don't give the authority to others where positive changes which are needed can be implemented. 
  15. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Sisterfatima1 in Should Shia masjids make revert groups   
    Salam 
    I think it would be beneficial if revert groups could be formed in the masjid as it is beneficial to meet others that are in the same situation as each other 
    I put this idea forward before but it has never been entertained 
  16. Sad
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Ashvazdanghe in Grand Ayatollah Mohaqiq Kabuli passes away   
    Grand Ayatollah Mohaqiq Kabuli passes away
    http://en.abna24.com/news//grand-ayatollah-mohaqiq-kabuli-passes-away_949689.html
     
    June 11, 2019 - 3:01 PM News Code : 949689 Source : IQNALink: 

     
    Ayatollah Qorbanali Mohaqiq Kabuli, an Afghan Shia source of emulation, died at the age of 91. 
    Ahlul Bayt News Agency (ABNA): Ayatollah Qorbanali Mohaqiq Kabuli, an Afghan Shia source of emulation, died at the age of 91. 

    Ayatollah Kabuli, who resided in Iran’s holy city of Qom, died on Tuesday morning. 

    He was born in 1928 into a religious family in Parwan province, near the Afghan capital of Kabul. 

    At the age of 7, he started learning the Qur'an and Persian reading and then Islamic teachings and Arabic literature. 

    Ayatollah Kabuli continued his religious education in Kabul and then left for the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, to study at the prestigious seminary there. 

    He wrote various books on religious studies, including on Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence).
    Ayatollah Mohaqiq Kabuli was a prominent member of the Ahlul Bayt World Assembly.
    http://en.abna24.com/news//grand-ayatollah-mohaqiq-kabuli-passes-away_949689.html
  17. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from TryHard in Importance Of Physical Attraction In Marriage   
    (salam)
    There have been many beneficial discussions and threads on the importance of religiosity (Imaan and Piety) and Akhlaq as being the two most important characteristics that an individual seeking to get married should look for in a potential spouse. However sometimes there has been little attention/analysis given to the significance of 'Physical attractiveness' between the potential spouses.
    According to the 35 years experienced therapist who have written an article on this subject, on http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/magnetic-partners/201311/the-role-physical-attraction-in-your-relationship , Physical attractiveness is vital in a successful marriage life. 
    In the article he talks about how even though some couples that came to him for help, loved and respected their partner because of their good characteristics, yet the lack of 'physical attraction' was what led their marriage to failure and thus came to seek his help. 
    Here are some of his important quotes:
    - In nearly 35 years of practicing couple’s therapy I’ve never seen a partner “get it” when they “never had it” to begin with, (referring to physical attraction). 
    - I’ve seen a few who “had some” and “grew more,” but even those that were attracted to non-physical aspects of their partners (such as intellect) couldn’t seem to harvest a physical attraction. In this sense, you either have it from the beginning or…
    - None of the partners that lost desire disliked their mates. All felt guilty about their behaviour and expressed empathy for their partners.
    Also some viewers have commented at the bottom of the article about how they also suffer or did suffer from this problem. 
    I went on al-islam.org and found this book on marriage by Sayed Athar Hussain H.S Rizvi, http://www.al-islam.org/islamic-marriage-syed-athar-husain-sh-rizvi, there which I found a hadith by the Prophet (P) which  says, “When one intends to marry a woman, he should ask about her hair, just as he asks about her face (beauty), since the hair is one of the two beauties (of women).” 
    Thus encouraging the importance of physical attraction when looking for a potential life partner.
    Consequently those that advice young people saying that physical attraction is not important, or it fades away, are not quite right. Nonetheless this does not goes to say that one should go looking for the most attractive spouse they can find and sacrifice other more important traits, but rather one should consider the chemistry when choosing a potential spouse. 
    I'd like to see the opinions of specially our married brothers and sisters on this forum. 
  18. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Bakir in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    @SlaveOfAllah14 Indeed, maybe reverts can see what we seem to struggle with. I have discussed in the veterans forums the situation within my local community, where the younger generation has almost entirely left Islam due to the stupidity of the older generation. For years, we have been talking of assuming (the youth within our community) the administration and organization of the Islamic center, but this is never done due to the power trip some old people have with this position. They abuse this for political favour in Iraq, or to fill whatever gap they have in their self esteem. Our ideas could never become true because of this behaviour. We wanted to teach people Islam and culture too, but with the correct approach in the Western context. They would end up feeling Islam and their culture is a shield to them, not a vulnerable point in their character. But that wasn't possible, and right now our Islamic center is a cultural ghetto that only has people who probably have, in the best of cases 20 years of life remaining and can change nothing.
    It has appeared a revert group that is doing interesting developments, and they are self organized. I love their work, but I think they won't offer all what I feel an Islamic center needs. Among other things, I see the use of Arabic important, and I believe we deserve an Islamic center using Arabic without suffering all the disadvantages of (unnecessary/harmful) culture.
    @Fink, I also believe Islam is very flexible, though this point is somewhat controversial. Problem with Islam's flexibility is the abuse by hypocrites. Thus, the situation tends to get polarized in people who are more conservative than Islam itself due to being exposed to hypocrites, and people who got used to have Islam as a cultural asset in their life but have no interest in it, thus they transform it to their wish.
  19. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Fink in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    I always say, if you want God to chase and haunt you , have some doubt. Because he'll come for you and you will know he is the truth. 
    But to the OPs point, this is one of reasons why I've become a Quranist- because there is massive cultural/societal influence on Islam / sectarianism. 
    When in reality, Islam is flexible and can fit different lifestyles.
  20. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from funklebits in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    What you stated brother @Bakir is sadly the true reality. In the western world, what the young generation grows up with, the society, their education, their whole surrounding is a complete clash to the type of Islam that is brought from the Asia/Africa. The lecture below by Jeffrey Lang hits the same points which u hit in your post. I believe the only hope and solution are our revert brothers. As far as I see it, they are the only ones that can save Islam in the west. They need to form their own revert communities, build their own mosques, where they can easily practice Islam in a western manner, clean and clear of all those middle-east/Asian cultural nonsense baggage. Then the new generation of born Muslims can gather around them in the community centres/mosques.
     
     
  21. My Prayers
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Bakir in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    What you stated brother @Bakir is sadly the true reality. In the western world, what the young generation grows up with, the society, their education, their whole surrounding is a complete clash to the type of Islam that is brought from the Asia/Africa. The lecture below by Jeffrey Lang hits the same points which u hit in your post. I believe the only hope and solution are our revert brothers. As far as I see it, they are the only ones that can save Islam in the west. They need to form their own revert communities, build their own mosques, where they can easily practice Islam in a western manner, clean and clear of all those middle-east/Asian cultural nonsense baggage. Then the new generation of born Muslims can gather around them in the community centres/mosques.
     
     
  22. My Prayers
    SlaveOfAllah14 got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    What you stated brother @Bakir is sadly the true reality. In the western world, what the young generation grows up with, the society, their education, their whole surrounding is a complete clash to the type of Islam that is brought from the Asia/Africa. The lecture below by Jeffrey Lang hits the same points which u hit in your post. I believe the only hope and solution are our revert brothers. As far as I see it, they are the only ones that can save Islam in the west. They need to form their own revert communities, build their own mosques, where they can easily practice Islam in a western manner, clean and clear of all those middle-east/Asian cultural nonsense baggage. Then the new generation of born Muslims can gather around them in the community centres/mosques.
     
     
  23. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Bakir in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    Many of the topics I discuss may be somewhat undesirable for many Muslims. It's not only in ShiaChat, but in my local community. I may be wrong, but there is indeed a good intention behind this, partly based on my very own experience. I was raised by a very strict father, and I was even stricter than him in terms of religion (never missed the 51 rakats nor daily morning duas, nor allowed leisure time based on anything else than philosophical and theological books). Yet still I exploded and fell into sin because I wasn't realizing I was repressing my ideas and my nafs unjustly, and I felt proud of that. 
    Many youth within our communities develop a lot of questions and doubts regarding not only their religion, but their social customs, roles, interactions, taboos, etc. And oftenly, they don't separate religion from that, because both come from the SAME source: parents. At certain point, these customs start clashing with their goals and lifestyle (haram partying, early arranged marriages, etc.). If it wasn't for these clashes, they wouldn't start questioning their faith, how they experiment it, how their families follow Islam, etc. Can't go sleep to my friend's house, nor go partying with friends, nor avoid arranged marriage with an Iraqi or whatever culture I feel little to no connection to it, etc. These youth may also, at the same time, be discriminated for being Muslims, and judged by ideas conmonly defended by Muslims (views on feminism, women's role in society, lgbt issues, etc.).
    This is an unevitable secularist force, that we may shun with bad words, or start talking openly about it. And this is done with reasonable ideas (not merely based on Islam, because Westerners know no Islam). We have to shield youth with a mentality and a logic that may make them able to argue and defend the ideas they were educated in by Islam, IN CASE they feel comfortable with them (otherwise they just don't believe in Islam, and that is up to Allah to guide or not guide people).
    The point of all this is not to change Islam, but to leave the doors of debate always open, with good manners instead of prejudices against Western ideas, nor censorship, nor backwards mentality. This, my friends, will encourage youth not to develop an extreme reaction against Islam and their culture altogether when circumstances are against them. And this reaction, the more extreme it is, the harder it is to return to Islam. And we will want to return, for sure we will, when the strength of youth is not present, nor the ferocity of innovative ideas, nor revolutionary movements nor the passion of making new friends and develop new ideas. When sickness and weakness, and the shadow of death is our only companion in solitude, when we feel really useless, at that time, we will want to go back to the God we unjustly forgot.
    Many SCers have precisely contacted me when they started feeling doubts, when they started "that phase". I'm not so much worried with the phase, but with the idea of forgetting God and Islam, closing the door. We may have our times where we forgot our prayers, focus on friends and work and fun. But be careful with leaving religion completely forgotten. Always keep something with you, leave the door open, consider you will want to go back and focus on your faith. Leave that good niyyah in you.
    There may be many points you feel hard to accept, many of them probably social rather than religious (as the recently discussed women's social issues). Be open, discuss whatever you like, share your opinions, find someone to hear them. Don't feel apart, don't feel an alien within the Islamic community, as it is more diverse and more welcoming than you would ever expect if you keep trying. You will find people like you, who hold a special place for Islam in their hearts, with whom you will feel not alone, and you will see that the beauty you found in this religion isn't necessarily linked with what may make you hate your life, your origins or your family's customs.
    Youth in my local community have almost entirely left Islam. Saying this because it's way easier and less hard to prevent this than to fix it. Let's put things easier for youth to speak out their doubts, their worries, their desires and interests in life, let's try to judge less, let's make an effort to understand nowaday mentality, see why it matters and why it convinces so many youth people.
    It's hard to reach conviction without doubt. Doubt is the principle of any talib al ilm. So instead of repressing your doubts and yourself out of external pressure, consider being open, question anything that clashes with your life, and use your reason to find the best of all ideas and approaches. In this convenient way, pressure won't kill you nor make you have undesirable reactions towards your society, family, religion, and, in the end, against yourself.
  24. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Abu Hadi in When there is no hope in religion for youth   
    The religion of Islam is much more flexible and accomodating than it is commonly known to be. Most Muslims follow 'cultural Islam' meaning Islam as defined their particular culture and community. So this is what the youth are rebelling against, because it is a system which usually contains many contradictions. Most of them have no idea what the real Islam is. That is the problem.  The solution is to educate themselves. Learn Arabic, learn to read Qur'an and Hadith in Arabic, Study the philosophical context of the religion, at least the basic parts. Most parents force their children to do the parts of the religion, like prayer and fasting, that if they didn't do them it would embarrass them. So the end result of their effort is so they won't be embarrassed, not so their children will understand the religion. Understanding the philosophy behind Salat and Fasting, and their context within the religion should be explained before the parents force their children to do the act. One example, there are many. 
    Also environments should be set up, by the community, in real life, not just online, where youth can ask questions and explore issues in an atmosphere free of judgement. There should also be spiritual mentoring groups set up, etc. 
  25. Like
    SlaveOfAllah14 reacted to Ruq in Why Not Only Follow Quran?   
    Salam, I'm picking up on this for discussions sake. I see people use this argument a lot and it always baffles me somewhat. Its based on the supposition that there needs to be 1 specific way to pray, which is a hadith based notion. The Quran doesnt make this claim, so for a Quranist it isnt a problem, just like it isnt for Christians. Before i came to Islam it hadnt occurred to me that there should be 1 strict way for everyone to pray and its not at all obvious why that would need ot be the case. If you want to pray communally and in unison its helpful to have an agreed upon way in which you will do it, but thats a different notion than saying there should be only 1 way to do it that is acceptable.
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