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In the Name of God بسم الله

Jay

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  1. Like
    Jay got a reaction from ss99 in Allah's Creation   
    :)
  2. Thanks
    Jay got a reaction from Aabiss_Shakari in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  3. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Hameedeh in Allah's Creation   
    :)
  4. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Alzaynebia313 in Why Is Slavery Permissible In Islam?   
    Just take the example of the west when they tried to emancipate slavery. Not only did it start a huge civil war, but also made society despise black people and become discriminatory against them for over a century. Slavery was a huge thing in Arabia back in those days. Abolishing it completely could've caused many problems for the Prophet (pbuh), as it did for the west. Without abolishing it completly, the Prophet (pbuh) made it difficult to own a slave.
    The word slave in English is a hated and resented word. The word "slave" in Arabic, Abd, is considered the holiest state of a Muslim, and is a great and revered title. Abd Allah, the slave of God, is often characterized to the Prophet (pbuh), and you say it at least 9 times a day during your prayers (during shahadat). Islam gave slaves a highly revered status and made them equal to free men.
    First off, you can't make someone a slave unless they were captured by a true Islamic Jihad against a kafir enemy and this is only to perserve their life. In most cases, these slaves could buy their own freedom (with either work or money) or were freed without any ransom. Heavy restrictions were placed as to not seperate family members.
    Many of Islamic penalties (kaffaras) required you to free a slave. For example, Muslims had to free a slave every time they would break a fast during Ramadan without a good reason, in addition to fasting that day again. Many many other rulings were set in place so that a slave could easily be freed, even from simple things like becoming handicap. Furthermore, to free a slave was considered to be a great Islamic act and was highly encouraged.
    Also note that some slaves, like the ones who were owned by Ahlulbayt, chose to remain slaves out of love for their master. I mean, who wouldn't want to live in the holiest household on earth.
  5. Like
    Jay got a reaction from insearchoflight in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  6. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Muslim2010 in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  7. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Hameedeh in Angel Of Death   
    I prefer this movie (It's Shi'i)

  8. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Al-Hassan in Why Believe?   
    ^At the very least, I don't make fun of people.
  9. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Syed_Zago in The Official Sc Shia Ring Appreciation Thread   
    My ring was created by Sauron in the firey depths of Orodruin.

  10. Like
    Jay got a reaction from -Enlightened in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  11. Like
    Jay got a reaction from religion of logic in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  12. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Robin Hood in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  13. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Safannah in Why Do We Sunnis Hate Imam Ali?   
    A better question; why do sunnis praise people who hated Imam Ali (as)?
  14. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Hameedeh in Our Purpose   
    What relevance does this have to the current discussion?
  15. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Hameedeh in Prophet Yusuf (Joseph) IRIB TV series   
    That's Prophet Yusuf (as) in Prison. He looks much better after he gets out of prison.
  16. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Ali H Syed in Topic Poll | Bashar Al Assad   
    The question is flawed. I'm with him on certain issues and against him on others. You can't be 100% with or against someone.
  17. Like
    Jay reacted to Gypsy in Yasser Habib Says That Hamas Is Terrorists   
    He's not boring at all. You are probably thingking about another Yassir Habib.
    And I actually agree with him on this. If you didn't love the nasibis/sunnis/wahaabis soo much then you would probably see his point of view.
  18. Like
    Jay got a reaction from peace seeker in Angel Of Death   
    I prefer this movie (It's Shi'i)

  19. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Hameedeh in If You Met Al-hujja (af)   
    Guys, I meant as a question, not seek forgiveness.
  20. Like
    Jay got a reaction from aliasghark in Why Is Slavery Permissible In Islam?   
    Just take the example of the west when they tried to emancipate slavery. Not only did it start a huge civil war, but also made society despise black people and become discriminatory against them for over a century. Slavery was a huge thing in Arabia back in those days. Abolishing it completely could've caused many problems for the Prophet (pbuh), as it did for the west. Without abolishing it completly, the Prophet (pbuh) made it difficult to own a slave.
    The word slave in English is a hated and resented word. The word "slave" in Arabic, Abd, is considered the holiest state of a Muslim, and is a great and revered title. Abd Allah, the slave of God, is often characterized to the Prophet (pbuh), and you say it at least 9 times a day during your prayers (during shahadat). Islam gave slaves a highly revered status and made them equal to free men.
    First off, you can't make someone a slave unless they were captured by a true Islamic Jihad against a kafir enemy and this is only to perserve their life. In most cases, these slaves could buy their own freedom (with either work or money) or were freed without any ransom. Heavy restrictions were placed as to not seperate family members.
    Many of Islamic penalties (kaffaras) required you to free a slave. For example, Muslims had to free a slave every time they would break a fast during Ramadan without a good reason, in addition to fasting that day again. Many many other rulings were set in place so that a slave could easily be freed, even from simple things like becoming handicap. Furthermore, to free a slave was considered to be a great Islamic act and was highly encouraged.
    Also note that some slaves, like the ones who were owned by Ahlulbayt, chose to remain slaves out of love for their master. I mean, who wouldn't want to live in the holiest household on earth.
  21. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Goswami in Pentagon Relies On Iran For Usa Soldier Health   
    http://rt.com/usa/ne...tivenin-us-184/

  22. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Logical Islam in Religion Is Needed To Dictate Morality   
    I believe that morality through concepts alone is flawed. There's no binding that can chain you to a concept. Religion chains you to morality out of fear of Hell. Likewise, state laws chain you to morality through the fear of legal consequences.
    To organize and follow a concept of morality, there must be fear of punishment in its transgression. Otherwise it would be too unstable. Even if someone without any religious faith creates a perfect moral system for himself and forces himself to follow it, it still is unstable. To violate your moral beliefs believing that no one will judge you for it is too easy.
    Belief in religion is a much more powerful chain, since there are no loopholes. You do an immoral action, you will be punished. In the material world, a person who commits a crime must undergo a fallible process and still has a chance to escape from punishment, or be punished for a crime he did not commit. In a divine court, such things are impossible. Every action you commit is questioned and every sin you commit, no matter how small, will be accounted for.
    If one truly believes in a religion, he assumes a powerful chain on himself that no law or system can create. The only question is the moral system itself and not the effectiveness of it.
  23. Like
    Jay got a reaction from power in Topic Poll | Bashar Al Assad   
    The question is flawed. I'm with him on certain issues and against him on others. You can't be 100% with or against someone.
  24. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Lanatin in Religion Is Needed To Dictate Morality   
    I believe that morality through concepts alone is flawed. There's no binding that can chain you to a concept. Religion chains you to morality out of fear of Hell. Likewise, state laws chain you to morality through the fear of legal consequences.
    To organize and follow a concept of morality, there must be fear of punishment in its transgression. Otherwise it would be too unstable. Even if someone without any religious faith creates a perfect moral system for himself and forces himself to follow it, it still is unstable. To violate your moral beliefs believing that no one will judge you for it is too easy.
    Belief in religion is a much more powerful chain, since there are no loopholes. You do an immoral action, you will be punished. In the material world, a person who commits a crime must undergo a fallible process and still has a chance to escape from punishment, or be punished for a crime he did not commit. In a divine court, such things are impossible. Every action you commit is questioned and every sin you commit, no matter how small, will be accounted for.
    If one truly believes in a religion, he assumes a powerful chain on himself that no law or system can create. The only question is the moral system itself and not the effectiveness of it.
  25. Like
    Jay got a reaction from Kamranistan in Religion Is Needed To Dictate Morality   
    I believe that morality through concepts alone is flawed. There's no binding that can chain you to a concept. Religion chains you to morality out of fear of Hell. Likewise, state laws chain you to morality through the fear of legal consequences.
    To organize and follow a concept of morality, there must be fear of punishment in its transgression. Otherwise it would be too unstable. Even if someone without any religious faith creates a perfect moral system for himself and forces himself to follow it, it still is unstable. To violate your moral beliefs believing that no one will judge you for it is too easy.
    Belief in religion is a much more powerful chain, since there are no loopholes. You do an immoral action, you will be punished. In the material world, a person who commits a crime must undergo a fallible process and still has a chance to escape from punishment, or be punished for a crime he did not commit. In a divine court, such things are impossible. Every action you commit is questioned and every sin you commit, no matter how small, will be accounted for.
    If one truly believes in a religion, he assumes a powerful chain on himself that no law or system can create. The only question is the moral system itself and not the effectiveness of it.
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