Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

HamzaTR

Advanced Members
  • Content Count

    1,324
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Reputation Activity

  1. Partially Agree
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Ageng Bagus Bima Pambudhi in Is Ahmadiyya A Branch Of Sunni Sect?   
    Salam. Where do you get your knowledge on shia from? lol. Shia and Sunni shahada do not differ..
    And secondly, why don't you just ask them about their beliefs? I will quote from their fav books on introducing Ahmadiyya;
     
     taken from their official site: http://www.alislam.org/books/religiousknowledge/sec4.html &  http://www.alislam.org/books/religiousknowledge/sec5.html the book analyses Ahmadiyya under the branch of sunni islam, yet it states three major differences.. their say on Prophethood is that Prophet Muhammad is the seal of Prophethood not Prophets.. And, they argue that Mirza Ahmad is the Messiah.. Strange thing is they could just say they believed in reincarnation specifically for Jesus (which to me should be the case if Jesus were to come not just as in movement but both in person and ideology/movement).. But, Ahmadis say the two (Jesus and mirza Ahmad) have no relation after all, the latter is the promised one in the end times.. Interestingly because the movement does not succeed, they believe in occultation.. lol. there are more weird people in islam than myself..  :D I would love them more if they followed Jafari fiqh instead of hanafi and they all believed in imamate and they did not believe in the wrong person as the second coming of Messiah..
  2. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from habib e najjaar in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
  3. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from habib e najjaar in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
    A pic from Quds day in Turkey;
     

     
    :wub:
  4. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from zambala in Mujtahid Fatwas Vs. Imam Hadiths: Chess   
    Akhbarism to Shia faith is like Salafism to Sunni faith. When the hadiths are analysed, the time, the conditions of the people etc. should be studied together. The reasons of hadiths, the adressees of the hadiths, and all that. If you don't do it while applying hadiths, you might end up returning to the cultures of the past. The reason we are called usulis and not akhbaris is that we get the essence, the reasons of the Hadiths and we apply it in a new context. This is called interpretation. But the supposition on the interpretation being out of desire is false. It is interpretation out of reasoning-logic.
     
    And the matters of music and chess is like that. Without focusing on the conditions of the people that time, (e.g. music always being played in haram gatherings, chess being played with bets, and etc.) one might equate himself with the adressees of the hadith that time, thus he might make mistake. I remember, not long ago, I was talking to a salafi online, he explained me why "images are banned" through sunni hadiths. And I said, even if the hadiths are true, he is equating himself with the ex-idolworshippers of that time. Of course an ex-idolworhipper would be suggested to not have images of any kind, either with the fear of him returning to the old tradition or with the fear of him remembering sad memories all the time. But, we can't ban everyone images. It would be wrong especially when in Quran, Prophet Soleiman is mentioned to order jinnkind to paint and sculpture for him. So, as you see, one needs to study the time and conditions of people when analysing hadiths. Why and to whom the Prophet and Imams said such things. Otherwise, we would be moving and adapting ourselves to the conditions of the past, not the vice-versa.
     
    I hope I make sense. ma salam
  5. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from zambala in Al-Sistani's On Insulting The Wives And Companions   
    Salam, brother, Haxis. Imam Ali (a.s) says, ''People are either brother to you in faith, or brother/equal to you in humanity''.
    And sunnis, shias, sufis, all are brothers in FAITH as Quran 49:10 clearly states. And the consensus of all sects have always been that all of them are Muslims. Hajj is an example to that. As you know, only believers are allowed to perform pilgrimage. And, never in history have any of islamic sects been forbidden of forbade others from performing it. Only this can tell you what the consensus of Muslims is on this issue. All sects are believers, thus brothers in faith. But some maybe misguided, but it is irrelevant.
     
    And thanks, Nader for sharing the fatwa here. And please let me add more fatwas by fuqaha and maraje:
     
    ''The great maraje and scholar's verdicts about reverence of companions and the prophet's (PBUH&HP) wives:''
     
    http://www.hajij.com/library/component/k2/item/1010-the-great-maraje-and-scholars-verdicts-about-reverence-of-companions-and-the-prophetspbuh-wifes
     
    ma salam
  6. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Waseem162 in Hollywood Wages War On Iran With Robocops   
    I mentioned this somewhere else and one of the replies was;
  7. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Waseem162 in Hollywood Wages War On Iran With Robocops   
    In the name of God. Salam
    I just watched first five mins of the movie RoboCop (2014) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1234721/ where American ROBOTS and Robo-Cops invade Iran, topple the government and disarm the nation and scan hijabi women for the fear of guns and bombs which would be used against invaders and the iranian nation trembles with fear, ready for scanning. Hollywoodism at its peak..
    The dogs of the devillish US govt are really barking up the wrong tree.. 'Operation Freedom Tehran'. HAHAHA. Another invasion and enslavement dream. But it is amazing that they also admit, it is something that can only be achieved in Robo-Cop fictions.. Well-done Islamic Iran and the brave Iranian nation..
    p.s. baradar jackson I really wish you could write a review on this one. Thanks. ma salam
  8. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Haji 2003 in Hollywood Wages War On Iran With Robocops   
    In the name of God. Salam
    I just watched first five mins of the movie RoboCop (2014) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1234721/ where American ROBOTS and Robo-Cops invade Iran, topple the government and disarm the nation and scan hijabi women for the fear of guns and bombs which would be used against invaders and the iranian nation trembles with fear, ready for scanning. Hollywoodism at its peak..
    The dogs of the devillish US govt are really barking up the wrong tree.. 'Operation Freedom Tehran'. HAHAHA. Another invasion and enslavement dream. But it is amazing that they also admit, it is something that can only be achieved in Robo-Cop fictions.. Well-done Islamic Iran and the brave Iranian nation..
    p.s. baradar jackson I really wish you could write a review on this one. Thanks. ma salam
  9. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Hameedeh in What Have You Watched Recently? [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    A five mins doc on Iranian shopping centers:
    PressTV should fire this reporter. haha. Or arrange a funny talk show for him like the "Double Standards" with Afshin Rattansi
  10. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Hameedeh in Complete Set Of Islamic Laws By Ayt. Khamenie?   
    As far as I know Rahbar suggests Imam Khomeini's jurisprudence book. And he only answers questions which are not mentioned there or when he needs to make some different points. Thus, I suggest studying Tahrir al-Wasilah of Imam Khomeini (r.a) first and you can check the rulings on Zakat in that book here (section five):
    http://www.al-shia.org/html/eng/books/fiqh&usool/islamic-laws/tahrir/index.html
    Or you can download Tahrir al-Wasilah here:
    Volume #1.pdf
    Volume #2.pdf
    Volume #3.pdf
    Volume #4.pdf
    Then for the things that are not there in the work, you can refer to the above links which the brethren shared. They are also available as e-book on Islamic Mobility website:
    Practical Laws of Islam - Rahbar.pdf
  11. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Lion of Shia in Are Most Of Us Involved In Shirk?   
    Salam. Not most of us.. Not sunnis, not shiites, not sufis.. None of these Muslims are involved in polytheism.. For neither saying Ya Muhammad, Ya Ali, etc, nor belief in the fact that Quran is not a creation, is against monotheism.. Rather, the opposite can be said.. For waseelah is a part of and requirement of monotheistic belief, just like belief in the eternity of the speech of God.. ma salam
  12. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Al Hadi in Al-Sistani's On Insulting The Wives And Companions   
    As if Ayatullah Sistani needed that freak's approval.
  13. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Mzwakhe in Suluk And Ibadah (nearness To God And Worship)   
    Suluk and Ibadah (Nearness to God and Worship)
    Ayatullah Murtadha Mutahhari



    Translated from Persian by Ali Quli Qara'i





    'Ibadah, or service, of the One God and negation of everything else as an object of service and worship, is one of the essential teachings of God-sent apostles-a feature never absent from the teachings of any prophet. As we know, in the sacred religion of Islam, too, worship occupies a preeminent position, with the only difference that worship in Islam is not regarded as a series of devotional rituals separate from everyday life and as pertaining solely to another world. Worship in Islam is located in the context of life and is an unalienable part of the Islamic philosophy of life.
    Aside from the fact that some of the Islamic acts of worship are performed collectively, Islam has structured them in such a fashion that their performance automatically ensures the performance of other duties of life. For instance, salat is a complete expression of man's servitude and surrender to God. It has been specified in such a manner that even a man who desires to pray in a lonely corner is forced to observe certain things of moral and social relevance, such as cleanliness, respect for rights of others, observance of punctuality, possession of a sense of direction, control over one's emotions, and expression of good-will and benevolence towards other righteous servants of God.
    From the point of view of Islam, every good and beneficial action if performed with a pure, God-seeking intention, is viewed as worship. Therefore, learning, acquisition of knowledge and livelihood and social service, if performed for God's sake, are acts of worship. Nevertheless, Islam also specifies a system of rituals and formal acts of worship such as salat, sawm (fasting) etc., which have a specific philosophy for performing them.
    Levels of Worship:
    Men have varying attitudes towards worship. Not all of them view it in the same light. For some, worship is a kind of deal, a barter and an exchange of labour performed for wages. Like an ordinary worker who spends his time and labour for the benefit of an employer and expects a daily wage in return, the devotee also endeavours for the sake of Divine reward, which, however, he would receive in the next world. Like the labourer, for whom his labour bears fruit in the form of his wages and who would not work except for a wage, the benefit of the devotee's worship, according to the outlook of this particular group of devotees, lies in the wages and reward which shall be granted to the devotees in the shape of the goods and comforts in the other world.
    However, every employer pays wages in return for the benefit he derives from his workers, but what benefit can the Lord of the heavens derive from the labours of a weak and feeble servant? Moreover, if we assume that the Great Employer does remunerate His servants in the form of the blessings and rewards of the Hereafter, then why does He not reward them without any effort and consumption of labour and energy? These are questions which never occur to this class of pious. From their viewpoint, the essence of worship lies in certain visible bodily movements and oscillations of the tongue. This is one attitude towards worship. Unrefined and vulgar it be, it is, in the words of Ibn Sina, as he puts it in the ninth chapter of His al-'Isharat, 'the attitude of the unenlightened and God-ignorant, acceptable only to the plebeians.'
    Another approach towards worship is that of the enlightened. Here the aforementioned problems of worker and employer, labour and wage, have no relevance. How can they be relevant when worship is viewed by them as the ladder to attain nearness to God, as the means of human sublimity, edification and upliftment of the soul and its flight to the invisible sphere of spiritual greatness, as an invigorating exercise of his spiritual faculties, and as a triumph of the spirit over the corporeal? It is the highest expression of the gratitude and love of the human being towards his Creator and his declaration of love for the Most Perfect and the Absolutely Beautiful, and finally, his wayfaring towards Allah!
    According to this approach, worship has a form and a soul, an appearance and an inner meaning. That which is expressed by the tongue and the movements of other members of the body, is the form, the outer mould, and the appearance of worship. Its soul and meaning is something else. The soul of worship is inextricably connected with the significance attached to worship by the devotee, his attitude towards it, his inner motive that drives him to it, the ultimate satisfaction and benefit he derives from it, and the extent to which he covers the Divine path in his journey towards God.
    The Approach of the Nahj al-balaghah:
    What approach and attitude is adopted by the Nahj al-balaghah towards worship? The Nahj al-balaghah takes an enlightened view of worship, or rather, it is, after the Holy Quran and the Sunnah of the Holy Prophet ('s), the main source of inspiration towards the enlightened approach to worship in the Islamic tradition.
    As we know, of the most sublime and imaginative themes of Islamic literature, both Arabic and Persian, is relationship between the ardent love of the devotee for the Divine Essence expressed in delicate and elegant passages in the form of sermons, prayers, allegories, parables, both in prose and verse. When we compare them with the pre-Islamic notions prevalent in the regions which subsequently constituted the domains of Islam, it is surprising to observe the gigantic leap that was taken by Islam in bestowing depth, scope, sweetness, and delicacy to human thought. Islam transformed a people who worshipped idols, images, fire, or degraded the Eternal God to the level of a human 'Father', and whose flight of imagination prompted them to identify the 'Father' with the 'Son', or who officially considered the Ahura Mazda to be a material form, whose statues they erected in every place, into a people whose intellect could grasp and evolve the most abstract of concepts, the most sophisticated ideas, the most elegant thoughts and most sublime notions.
    How was human intellect so radically transformed? What revolutionized their logic, elevated their thoughts, refined their emotions and sublimated their values? How did it happen? The al-Mu'allaqat al-sab'ah and the Nahj al-balaghah stand only one generation apart. Both of those generations of Arabs were proverbial in eloquence and literary genius. But as to the content, they stand as far apart as the earth and the sky. The former sing of the beauty of the beloved, the pleasures of love, of gallantry, horses, spears, nightly assaults, and compose eulogy and lampoon; the latter contains the sublimest ideas of man.
    In order to elucidate the approach of 'Ali ('a) towards worship, now we shall proceed to cite few examples from the Nahj al-balaghah, beginning with a statement about the differences in various approaches of people towards worship.
    The Worship of Freemen:
    "A group of people worshipped God out of desire for reward; this is the worship of traders. Another group worshipped God out of fear; this is the worship of slaves. Yet another group worshipped God out of gratitude; this is the worship of freemen." [1]
    "Even if God had not warned those disobedient to Him of chastisement, it was obligatory by way of gratefulness for His favours that He should not be disobeyed." [2]
    "My God, I have not worshipped Thee out of fear of Thy Hell and out of greed for Thy Paradise; but I found Thee worthy of worship, and so I worshipped Thee." [3]
    God's Remembrance:
    The roots of all spiritual, moral, and social aspects of worship lie in one thing: the remembrance of God and obliviousness towards everything else. In one of its verses, the Holy Quran refers to the educative and invigorating effect of worship, and says:
    The salat protects from unseemly acts. (29:45) Adhere to salat in order that you remain in My remembrance. (20:14)
    This is a reminder of the fact that the person who prays remembers God and lives by the knowledge that He is always observing and watching him, and does not forget that he himself is His servant.
    The remembrance of God, which is the aim of worship, is burnishing of the heart and an agency of its purification. It prepares the heart for the reflection of Divine Light in it. Speaking of the remembrance of God and the meaning of worship, 'Ali ('a) says:
    "Certainly God, the glorified, has made His remembrance burnishing of the hearts, which makes them hear after deafness, see after blindness, and makes them submissive after unruliness. In all periods and times when there were no prophets, there were individuals to whom He spoke in whispers through their conscience and intellects." [4]
    These sentences speak of the wonderful effect of Divine remembrance on the heart, to the extent of making it capable of receiving Divine inspiration and bringing it in intimate communion with God.
    Levels of Devotion:
    In the same sermon are explained the various spiritual states and levels attained by the worshippers in the course of their devotional search. 'Ali ('a) describes such men in these words:
    "The angels have surrounded them and peace is showered upon them. The doors of heavens are opened for them and abodes of blessedness, of which He had informed them, have been prepared for them. He is pleased with their struggle and admires their station. When they call Him, they breathe the scent of His forgiveness and mercy." [5]
    Nights of the Devout:
    From the point of view of the Nahj al-balaghah, the world of worship is another world altogether. Its delights are not comparable with any pleasures of the three-dimensional corporeal world. The world of worship effuses movement, progress, and journey, but a journey which is quite unlike physical travel to new lands. It is spiritual journey to the 'nameless city'. It does not know night from the day, because it is always drenched in light. In it there is no trace of darkness and pain, for it is throughout purity, sincerity, and delight. Happy is the man, in the view of the Nahj al-balaghah, who sets his foot into this world and is refreshed by its invigorating breeze. Such a man then no longer cares whether he lays his head on silken pillow or on a stone:
    "Blessed is he who discharges his duties towards his Lord, and endures the hardships they entail. He allows himself no sleep at nights until it over whelms him. Then lies down with the palm of his hand under head as his pillow. He is among those whom the thought of the Day of Judgement keeps wakeful at nights, whose beds remain vacant, whose lips hum in God's remembrance and whose sins have been erased by their prolonged earnest supplication for forgiveness They are the Hizbullah (Party of God); "surely Hizballah-they are the prosperers!"" [6]
    The nights of the men of God are like shiny days, The gloomy nights do not exist for the enlightened.
    The Profile of the Pious:
    In the last section we discussed the viewpoint of the Nahj al-balaghah with respect to worship. We found that the Nahj al-balaghah does not regard worship as a series of cut-and-dried, lifeless rituals. The bodily movements constitute the apparent body of worship, while its soul and meaning is something else. Only when endowed with meaning and spirit is worship worth its name. Real worship means transcending the three-dimensional world into the spiritual sphere, which is a world of perpetual delight and sublimation for the soul and the source of vigour and strength for the heart, which has its own pleasures.
    There are many references to the characteristics of the pious and the devout in the Nahj al-balaghah. Often the Nahj al-balaghah sketches the profiles of the pious and the devout and describes their characteristic fear of God, their devotion and delight in worship, their constant sorrow and grief over sins and frequent reciting of the Quran, and their occasional ecstatic experiences and states which they achieve in the course of their worshipful endeavours and struggle against their corporeal self. At times it discusses the role of worship in lifting from the human soul the pall of sins and black deeds, and often points out to the effect of worship in curing moral and psychic diseases. At other times it speaks about the unadulterated, unsurpassable and pure delights and ecstasies of the followers of the spiritual path and sincere worshippers of God.
    Night Vigils:
    During the night they are on their feet reciting the verses of the Quran one after the other, tarrying to deliberate about their meaning, and thereby instilling gnostic pathos into their souls and by means of it seek remedy for their spiritual ailments. What they hear from the Quran seems to them as if they are witnessing it with their own eyes. If they come across a verse arousing eagerness (for Paradise) they lean towards it covetingly and their souls cling to it avidly as if they are approaching their ultimate goal. And when they come across a verse that instills fear, their heart's ear is turned in attention to it as if they themselves hear the cracking sound of the flames of Hell Fire. Their backs are bent in reverence and their foreheads, palms, knees and toes rest on the ground as they beseech God for deliverance. But when the day dawns, they are kind, patient, scholarly, pious and righteous. [7]
    The Spiritual Experience:
    He has revived his intellect and slain his self, until his body became lean and its bulkiness shrunk, and stubborness turned into tenderness (of heart). Then an effulgence, like a thunderbolt, descended his heart and illuminated the path before him, opening all the doors, and led him straight into the gateway of Peace. Now his feet, carrying his body, are firmly rooted in the position of safety (on the Sirat) and comfort because he kept his heart busy with good deeds and won the good pleasure of his God. [8]
    As we observe, this passage speaks of another kind of life, which is called 'the life of intellect'. It speaks about struggle against the carnal self (al-nafs al-'ammarah) and its destruction; it speaks about exercise of the spirit and the body, about lightening, which as a result of exercise illumines the being of the follower and brightens his spiritual world; it speaks about the stages and targets that the devotee's earnest soul reaches on his way until it attains the last and highest stage of man's spiritual journey. The Quran says:
    O man! Thou art labouring unto thy Lord laboriously, and thou shalt encounter Him. (84:6)
    'Ali ('a), in the passage cited above, speaks about the inner peace, contentment and tranquillity of soul which a man's restless, disturbed and anxious heart ultimately attains:
    Indeed, the hearts are at rest in God 's remembrance. (13:28)
    In the sermon 228, 'Ali ('a) describes the significance attached by this class of devotees to spiritual life-the life of the heart:
    They see that the worldly people attach great importance to the death of their bodies but they themselves attach much greater importance to the death of hearts of those who are living. (Sermon 230) [9]
    'Ali ('a) describes the ecstatic eagerness of the earnest souls which impels them to move onwards on the path of spiritual perfection in these words:
    They lived in society and participated in its affairs with their bodies, while their souls rested in the higher spiritual spheres. [10]
    Had there been no preordained time of death for each of them, their spirits would not have remained in their bodies even for the twinkling of an eye because of their eagerness for the Divine reward and their fear of chastisement. [11]
    He did everything only for God, and so God also made him His own. [12]
    The esoteric knowledge and emanated insight, revealed to the heart of the follower of the spiritual path as a result of self-education and self-refinement, is described in these words:
    The knowledge that bursts upon them and surrounds them is endowed with absolute certainty, and their soul attains the highest degree of conviction. They easily bear what the easy-going regard as harsh and unbearable. They endear what makes the ignorant recoil with horror. [13]
    Purging of Sins:
    From the point of view of Islamic teachings, every sin leaves a black stain and the effects of distortion in the human heart which in turn weakens a person's aptitude for good and righteous actions, and consequently further deviates him towards other sins and foul deeds. On the other hand, worship, prayer and remembrance of God, develop a human being's religious consciousness, strengthen his aptitude for virtuous deeds and diminish his proneness to sin. This means that worship and remembrance of God efface the mal-effects of sins and replace these with fondness for virtue and goodness.
    In the Nahj al-balaghah there is a sermon which deals with salat, zakat and delivering of trust; after emphasizing the importance of salat, 'Ali ('a) further says:
    Certainly, prayer removes sins like autumn strips leaves off from trees, and it liberates you from the rope (of sins) tied around your neck. The Prophet ('s) likened it to a refreshing stream at one's door in which one takes a purifying bath five times in a day and night. Will after so much cleansing any dirt remain on him? [14]
    Moral Remedy:
    In the sermon 196, after referring to evil conduct such as disobedience, oppression, injustice and pride, 'Ali ('a) says:
    It is on account of these perils that God has encouraged His believing servants to perform salat and zakat, to keep fast during the days when it is made obligatory; these acts of worship give their limbs peace and rest, cast fear in their eyes, soften their spirits, cultivate a sense of humility in their hearts and purge them from pride.
    Intimacy and Ecstasy:
    My God, Thou, of all beloved ones, art the most attached to Thy lovers and most ready to trust those who trust in Thee. Thou seest, Thou lookest into their secrets and knowest that which lies in their conscience and art aware of the extent of their inner vision. Consequently their secrets are open to Thee and their hearts look up to Thee in eager apprehension. In loneliness, Thy remembrance is their friend and consolation. In distress Thy help is their protection. [15]
    There are some people devoted to remembrance of Allah who have chosen it in place of all worldly goods. [16]
    In the sermon 148, 'Ali ('a) alludes to the coming times of the Promised al-Mahdi ('a)-may God hasten his appearance-and at the end of his discourse describes the courage, wisdom, insight and
    Then a group of people will be made ready by God like the swords sharpened by the blacksmith. Their sight would be brightened by revelations the inner meaning of the Quran would be familiar to their ears and they would be given to drink the cup of wisdom every morning and evening. [17]
    Notes:
    [1] Nahj al-balaghah, Hikam, No. 237
    [2] Ibid, Hikam, No. 290
    [3] Source of reference not indicated (Tr.)
    [4] Ibid,. Khutab, No. 222
    [5] Ibid,. p. 343
    [6] Ibid,. Rasail, No. 45
    [7] Ibid,. Khutab, No. 193
    [8] Ibid,. Khutab No. 220
    [9] Ibid, Khutab No. 230
    [10] Ibid, Hikam, No. 147
    [11] Ibid, Khutab No. 193
    [12] Ibid, Khutab No. 87
    [13] Ibid, Hikam, No. 147
    [14] Ibid, Khutab No.199
    [15] Ibid, Khutab No.227
    [16] Ibid, Khutab No.222
    [17] Ibid, Khutab No.150
    Quotation from "Glimpses of Nahj al-Balaghah"
    http://www.al-islam.org/al-tawhid/glimpses/
  14. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from shabir Ali in Farsi (Only) Noha / Latmiyya   
    A cute kid reciting noha in beynol harameyn:
    http://www.netiran.net/somayye/videos/26210/مداحی-کودک-در-بین-الحرمین
  15. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Auriba in Divine Love   
    Love of Allah   [...]   1. It is narrated that Allah, the Exalted, revealed to Prophet Dawud (‘a) saying, “O Dawud! My remembrance (dhikr) is for those who remember Me (dhakirin), My paradise is for the obedient ones (muti’in), My love (hubb) is for those who yearn for Me (mushtaqin); while I am specifically for the lovers (muhibbin).” 3   2. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “Love is better than fear (khawf).” 4   3. Muhammad bin Ya’qub al-Kulayni reports from Imam as-Sadiq (‘a), “There are three types of worshippers (‘ubbad); a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of fear; this is the worship of the slaves. A people who worship Allah, the Blessed, the Exalted, for reward; this is the worship of the merchants. And a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of love; this is the worship of the free people, and it is the best kind of worship (‘ibadah).” 5   4. Al-Kulayni also narrates from Holy Prophet (S) , “The best of the people is he who is passionately in love with worship (‘ibadah), embraces it, loves it from his heart, applies his body to it and attends to it, such that he is not bothered in which condition he is in this world, in difficulty or in ease.” 6   5. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “The secret conversation of those who have attained thorough recognition of Allah (‘arifin) revolves round three principles: fear (khawf), hope (raja’), and love (hubb). Fear is the subsidiary of knowledge (‘ilm), hope is a subsidiary of certainty (yaqin), and love is a subsidiary of recognition (ma’rifah). The sign of fear is taking flight (harab) {from the anger of Allah}; the sign of hope is seeking (talab); and the sign of love is to give preference to the Beloved over everything other than Him.   Thus, when knowledge is actualized in the breast (sadr), he would have fear (khawf); and when the fear gets firm, he would take flight (harab); and if he takes flight, he would attain salvation (najat); and when the light of certainty shines on his heart, he would witness the grace (fadl), and when he is able to see the grace, he would become hopeful; and when he experiences the sweetness of {the state of} hope, he would seek (talaba); and if he succeeds in seeking, he would find (wajada).   When the light of recognition (ma‘rifah) is disclosed (tajalla) to the heart (fu’ad), the breeze of love is stirred up (haja); and when the breeze of love is stirred up, he would become intimate with the patronage (dilal) of the Beloved, and prefer him over everything other than Him, and carry out His orders.   The parable of these three principles is that of the holy Sanctuary (haram), the sacred Mosque (al-masjid), and the ka‘bah; whoever enters the haram would be safe from the creatures; and whoever enters the masjid his limbs would be guarded from being employed by him in sinning; and whoever enters the ka‘bah his heart would be protected from being occupied by him with the remembrance of other than Allah.” 7   6. The Holy Prophet (S) is related to have said, “Prophet Shu’ayb (‘a) wept out of love of Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, until he lost his sight…, so Allah revealed onto him saying, ‘O Shu‘ayb! If this was out of fear of the Fire, then I have protected you from it; and if it was out of eagerness for the Heaven, then I have permitted you {to enter it}.’ So he said, ‘O Allah, O my Master, You are aware that I did not weep out of fear of Your fire, nor out of eagerness for Your heaven, but {because} Your love has engaged my heart such that I cannot endure {it} until I see You.’ So Allah, the Majestic, revealed to him saying, ‘If this is the case, then because of this I will make the one who spoke to Me (kalimi), Musa bin ‘Imran, to be at your service.” 8   7. A phrase in the book of Prophet Idris (‘a) read, “Blessed are a people who worshipped Me out of love, and took Me as {their} lord and nourisher, and kept awake at night and persisted during daytime in acquiring My pleasure without fear or eagerness, nor out of fear of the Fire or aspiration of the Heaven, but due to {their} sincere love, firm resolution, and detachment from all other Me.” 9   Imam al-Husayn (‘a) says in the supplication of ‘arafah, “Blind is the eye which does not see You watchful over itself, and the bargain of a servant for whom You have not allotted a share from Your love is in loss.” 10   Belief and Love   It has appeared in the Islamic sources that belief is nothing but love. Imam al-Baqir (‘a) says: “Belief (Iman) is love (hubb) and hatred (bughd).” 11   Fudayl bin Yasar reports, “I asked Abu ‘Abdillah {as-Sadiq} about love and hatred whether they are part of belief. He replied, ‘And is Iman other than love and hatred?’”12   Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) has also said, “Is religion (din) other than love? Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, says: ‘Say, ‘If you love Allah, then follow me; Allah will love you.’ 13 ” 14   Imam al-Baqir (‘a) is reported to have said, “Religion is the love, and love is the religion.” 15   The Pleasure of Love   If worship is out of love, eagerness and yearning, then there is no pleasure and sweetness above it. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), who is among those who had tasted the sweetness of love and remembrance of Allah, says: “O Allah… how pleasant is the taste of Your love, and how sweet is the drink of Your proximity.” 16   Indeed such a sweetness and pleasure dwells in the hearts of the friends (awliya’) of Allah. It is not something which occurs to them at times and goes away at other times. When the sweetness of the love of Allah settles in the heart of a person, then such a heart is the one inhabited by the love of Allah. And Allah shall never punish a heart inhabited by His love and in which the sweetness of His love has settled.   Imam ‘Ali (‘a) says: “O Allah, by Your might and glory, I have loved You with a love whose sweetness has settled in my heart. And the hearts of those who confess Your Oneness cannot believe that You hate Your lovers.” 17   Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (‘a) says regarding this steady and established state of the Divine love, “By Your might, O my Master, even if You drive me away, I will not leave Your door, and I will not cease to compliment You, because of what I have come to know of Your generosity and kindness.” 18   This is one of the most eloquent expressions describing the profundity of love and its abiding in the heart, such that it would not disappear from it or change even if his Master were to drive him away and distance him from His proximity. And far it is from Him that He should do that with a servant in whose heart His love has dwelt.   When one experiences the taste of the love of Allah, and the pleasure of intimacy with Him, he would not prefer anything over Him. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), the leader of the lovers, says: “O Allah, who can have tasted the sweetness of Your love, then wanted another in place of You? And who can have become intimate with Your nearness, then sought removal from You?” 19   The reason behind the difference of the people in relation to their goals and views about life is that they are deprived of the pleasure of the love of Allah. Otherwise those who have experienced such a pleasure do not seek anything else in life after this.   In the supplication of ‘arafah, Imam Husayn bin ‘Ali (‘a) says: “What has he found one who has lost You? And what has he lost one who has found You?” 20   Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a) seeks forgiveness from Allah for every pleasure other than the pleasure of the love of Allah, and for every occupation other than the remembrance of Allah, and from every happiness other than that of the proximity to Allah; not because Allah has prohibited His servants from all this, rather because of the fact that all this is the result of the distraction of one’s heart from Allah, and of its occupation with other than His remembrance even for a short time; whereas a heart which has experienced the pleasure of the love of Allah is never distracted from Him.   In fact, the dynamic force behind every action and endeavour in the life of the friends of Allah is the love of Allah, the Exalted, His remembrance and obedience. Anything beside this is seen as diversion from Allah. Hence, Imam as-Sajjad (‘a) seeks Allah’s forgiveness for all this and says: “I pray forgiveness from You for every pleasure other than that of Your remembrance, and for every ease other than that of intimacy with You, and for every happiness other than that of proximity to You, and for every occupation other than obeying You.” 21   [...]     3. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.226.   4. Ibid, vol.78, pg.226.   5. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.84.   6. Ibid, vol.2, pg.83.   7. Misbah al-Shari’ah, pg.2 3.   8. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.12, pg.380.   9. Ibid, vol.95, pg.467.   10. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   11. Ibid, vol.78, pg.175.   12. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.125.   13. Qur’an, 3:31.   14. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.69, pg.237.   15. Nur at-Thaqalayn, vol.5, pg.285.   16. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.26.   17. Munajat Ahl al-Bayt, pg.96 97.   18. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.85.   19. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.94, pg.148.   20. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   21. Ibid, vol.94, pg.151.   To read more, please see; http://www.al-islam.org/supplication-in-the-eyes-of-ahlalbayt-muhammad-mahdi-al-asifi/divine-love-supplications-ahl-al-bayt-
  16. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from P. Ease in Divine Love   
    Love of Allah   [...]   1. It is narrated that Allah, the Exalted, revealed to Prophet Dawud (‘a) saying, “O Dawud! My remembrance (dhikr) is for those who remember Me (dhakirin), My paradise is for the obedient ones (muti’in), My love (hubb) is for those who yearn for Me (mushtaqin); while I am specifically for the lovers (muhibbin).” 3   2. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “Love is better than fear (khawf).” 4   3. Muhammad bin Ya’qub al-Kulayni reports from Imam as-Sadiq (‘a), “There are three types of worshippers (‘ubbad); a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of fear; this is the worship of the slaves. A people who worship Allah, the Blessed, the Exalted, for reward; this is the worship of the merchants. And a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of love; this is the worship of the free people, and it is the best kind of worship (‘ibadah).” 5   4. Al-Kulayni also narrates from Holy Prophet (S) , “The best of the people is he who is passionately in love with worship (‘ibadah), embraces it, loves it from his heart, applies his body to it and attends to it, such that he is not bothered in which condition he is in this world, in difficulty or in ease.” 6   5. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “The secret conversation of those who have attained thorough recognition of Allah (‘arifin) revolves round three principles: fear (khawf), hope (raja’), and love (hubb). Fear is the subsidiary of knowledge (‘ilm), hope is a subsidiary of certainty (yaqin), and love is a subsidiary of recognition (ma’rifah). The sign of fear is taking flight (harab) {from the anger of Allah}; the sign of hope is seeking (talab); and the sign of love is to give preference to the Beloved over everything other than Him.   Thus, when knowledge is actualized in the breast (sadr), he would have fear (khawf); and when the fear gets firm, he would take flight (harab); and if he takes flight, he would attain salvation (najat); and when the light of certainty shines on his heart, he would witness the grace (fadl), and when he is able to see the grace, he would become hopeful; and when he experiences the sweetness of {the state of} hope, he would seek (talaba); and if he succeeds in seeking, he would find (wajada).   When the light of recognition (ma‘rifah) is disclosed (tajalla) to the heart (fu’ad), the breeze of love is stirred up (haja); and when the breeze of love is stirred up, he would become intimate with the patronage (dilal) of the Beloved, and prefer him over everything other than Him, and carry out His orders.   The parable of these three principles is that of the holy Sanctuary (haram), the sacred Mosque (al-masjid), and the ka‘bah; whoever enters the haram would be safe from the creatures; and whoever enters the masjid his limbs would be guarded from being employed by him in sinning; and whoever enters the ka‘bah his heart would be protected from being occupied by him with the remembrance of other than Allah.” 7   6. The Holy Prophet (S) is related to have said, “Prophet Shu’ayb (‘a) wept out of love of Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, until he lost his sight…, so Allah revealed onto him saying, ‘O Shu‘ayb! If this was out of fear of the Fire, then I have protected you from it; and if it was out of eagerness for the Heaven, then I have permitted you {to enter it}.’ So he said, ‘O Allah, O my Master, You are aware that I did not weep out of fear of Your fire, nor out of eagerness for Your heaven, but {because} Your love has engaged my heart such that I cannot endure {it} until I see You.’ So Allah, the Majestic, revealed to him saying, ‘If this is the case, then because of this I will make the one who spoke to Me (kalimi), Musa bin ‘Imran, to be at your service.” 8   7. A phrase in the book of Prophet Idris (‘a) read, “Blessed are a people who worshipped Me out of love, and took Me as {their} lord and nourisher, and kept awake at night and persisted during daytime in acquiring My pleasure without fear or eagerness, nor out of fear of the Fire or aspiration of the Heaven, but due to {their} sincere love, firm resolution, and detachment from all other Me.” 9   Imam al-Husayn (‘a) says in the supplication of ‘arafah, “Blind is the eye which does not see You watchful over itself, and the bargain of a servant for whom You have not allotted a share from Your love is in loss.” 10   Belief and Love   It has appeared in the Islamic sources that belief is nothing but love. Imam al-Baqir (‘a) says: “Belief (Iman) is love (hubb) and hatred (bughd).” 11   Fudayl bin Yasar reports, “I asked Abu ‘Abdillah {as-Sadiq} about love and hatred whether they are part of belief. He replied, ‘And is Iman other than love and hatred?’”12   Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) has also said, “Is religion (din) other than love? Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, says: ‘Say, ‘If you love Allah, then follow me; Allah will love you.’ 13 ” 14   Imam al-Baqir (‘a) is reported to have said, “Religion is the love, and love is the religion.” 15   The Pleasure of Love   If worship is out of love, eagerness and yearning, then there is no pleasure and sweetness above it. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), who is among those who had tasted the sweetness of love and remembrance of Allah, says: “O Allah… how pleasant is the taste of Your love, and how sweet is the drink of Your proximity.” 16   Indeed such a sweetness and pleasure dwells in the hearts of the friends (awliya’) of Allah. It is not something which occurs to them at times and goes away at other times. When the sweetness of the love of Allah settles in the heart of a person, then such a heart is the one inhabited by the love of Allah. And Allah shall never punish a heart inhabited by His love and in which the sweetness of His love has settled.   Imam ‘Ali (‘a) says: “O Allah, by Your might and glory, I have loved You with a love whose sweetness has settled in my heart. And the hearts of those who confess Your Oneness cannot believe that You hate Your lovers.” 17   Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (‘a) says regarding this steady and established state of the Divine love, “By Your might, O my Master, even if You drive me away, I will not leave Your door, and I will not cease to compliment You, because of what I have come to know of Your generosity and kindness.” 18   This is one of the most eloquent expressions describing the profundity of love and its abiding in the heart, such that it would not disappear from it or change even if his Master were to drive him away and distance him from His proximity. And far it is from Him that He should do that with a servant in whose heart His love has dwelt.   When one experiences the taste of the love of Allah, and the pleasure of intimacy with Him, he would not prefer anything over Him. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), the leader of the lovers, says: “O Allah, who can have tasted the sweetness of Your love, then wanted another in place of You? And who can have become intimate with Your nearness, then sought removal from You?” 19   The reason behind the difference of the people in relation to their goals and views about life is that they are deprived of the pleasure of the love of Allah. Otherwise those who have experienced such a pleasure do not seek anything else in life after this.   In the supplication of ‘arafah, Imam Husayn bin ‘Ali (‘a) says: “What has he found one who has lost You? And what has he lost one who has found You?” 20   Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a) seeks forgiveness from Allah for every pleasure other than the pleasure of the love of Allah, and for every occupation other than the remembrance of Allah, and from every happiness other than that of the proximity to Allah; not because Allah has prohibited His servants from all this, rather because of the fact that all this is the result of the distraction of one’s heart from Allah, and of its occupation with other than His remembrance even for a short time; whereas a heart which has experienced the pleasure of the love of Allah is never distracted from Him.   In fact, the dynamic force behind every action and endeavour in the life of the friends of Allah is the love of Allah, the Exalted, His remembrance and obedience. Anything beside this is seen as diversion from Allah. Hence, Imam as-Sajjad (‘a) seeks Allah’s forgiveness for all this and says: “I pray forgiveness from You for every pleasure other than that of Your remembrance, and for every ease other than that of intimacy with You, and for every happiness other than that of proximity to You, and for every occupation other than obeying You.” 21   [...]     3. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.226.   4. Ibid, vol.78, pg.226.   5. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.84.   6. Ibid, vol.2, pg.83.   7. Misbah al-Shari’ah, pg.2 3.   8. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.12, pg.380.   9. Ibid, vol.95, pg.467.   10. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   11. Ibid, vol.78, pg.175.   12. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.125.   13. Qur’an, 3:31.   14. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.69, pg.237.   15. Nur at-Thaqalayn, vol.5, pg.285.   16. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.26.   17. Munajat Ahl al-Bayt, pg.96 97.   18. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.85.   19. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.94, pg.148.   20. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   21. Ibid, vol.94, pg.151.   To read more, please see; http://www.al-islam.org/supplication-in-the-eyes-of-ahlalbayt-muhammad-mahdi-al-asifi/divine-love-supplications-ahl-al-bayt-
  17. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from P. Ease in Divine Love   
    Love as the Highest Reason for Creation
    In early kalam (Islamic theology), a heated debate started on the purpose behind God's creations and acts. Some theologians thought that the attribution of reason or purpose to His deeds leads to the assumption that God is in need of His creatures and He creates them to meet some needs, just like a human being who, say, works to earn money, or studies to learn. However the dominant view, especially among those who have had a more rationalistic approach like Nasir ul‑Din al‑Tusi has always been that God is the Wise (hakim), so whatever He does is for some exactly and carefully pre‑studied purposes. He never does something arbitrarily or in vain. It is asserted in the Qur'an that, "What! Did you then think that We had created you in vain...?" (23:115)
    Of course, it is clear that God Himself does not gain anything from His creatures, nor from His act of creation. This is not only because He is completely free from any sort of need, but also because it is logically impossible that a given effect would have any type of influence on its (existential) cause. Whatever the effect has is received from the cause and it would be circular to suppose it otherwise. God has not created the universe to make some benefits for Himself, but rather to give benefits. A popular Persian poem says:
    "I have not created the creation to get some benefits,
    I have created people to show them my generosity."
    There is a famous divine saying (hadith qudsi) which can probably be found in all books written about the goal of creation in Islam. According to this hadith, God says: "I was a hidden treasure; I loved to be known. Hence I created the world so that I would be known."(My translation) The Arabic original term for "loved" is derived from the root hubb, which means to like or to love. In other words, hubb is a general concept that can belong to simple things such as preferring some types of food (which in English could be translated as 'would like') or to the most important things in one's life such as the intensive desire for someone or some ideals as the beloved to the extent that one might even be ready to be destroyed in order to please the beloved or secure it. Hubb in such cases can be translated into 'love'. There is another term in the Islamic culture which is sometimes used in Arabic and more commonly in Persian to mean the intensive love i.e. 'ishq :wub: There is also wudd which means mostly friendship and affection.
    Thus, a question arises: Why did God love to be known? Certainly, God has no desire for fame. The purpose behind His love to be known is understandable by considering the fact that God who is the Wise, the Compassionate and the Omnipotent creates the universe and particularly human beings to give them the maximum grace and perfection that they have the capacity for receiving. Of course, the perfection of any kind of being is decided by the degree of its similarity or closeness to God, and the most important factors in this are love of God, and prior to that knowledge of God, since there can be no love without knowing the beloved subject. [1]
    Since the reason for loving something is nothing other than the apprehension by the lover of the beauty and perfection or more generally the goodness of the beloved, the greatest possible love is certainly the love of God for Himself. God is the most beautiful and the most perfect being and His apprehension of Himself is also the best apprehension, so His love for Himself and His joy are the most intensive ones. Avicenna writes:
    "The necessarily existent (Wajib al‑wujud) that has the highest perfection, beauty and brightness and perceives of Himself as so with a complete perception ... is in Himself the greatest lover and the greatest beloved and has the greatest joy ..." [2]
    Elsewhere he says:
    "The being that has the greatest joy in respect to something is the First (al‑Awwal) in respect to Himself, since He has the greatest understanding and has the greatest perfection." [3]
    Sadr ud‑din al‑Shirazi, known as Mulla Sadra and the founder of the school of al‑hikmah al muta'aliyah, makes the same point:
    "What causes love is what is received or will be received from the beloved. The higher goodness and more intensive existence the more deserving for being loved and the greater love for goodness. Now the being, which is free from potentiality and contingency, due to its ultimate goodness, has the ultimate level of being loved and the ultimate level of loving. Therefore, His love for Himself is the most perfect love and the most loyal one." [4]
    He also adds that since God is the Simple (not compound, without any parts) and Divine attributes are not additional (or accidental) to His essence in existence (the idea which is greatly accepted by Muslim philosophers and the majority of theologians and known as the unity of His essence and His attributes), His love is identical to His essence. In this way, one can justifiably say that He is love as He is knowledge and life.
    God's love for the world in general, and human beings in particular is unanimously believed and emphasised by all Muslims. Indeed, one of the God's names is al‑Wadud, He who loves. This is in addition to those names which imply His love for creatures, such as al‑Rahman and al‑Rahim meaning the all‑Compassionate, the all‑Merciful. Every chapter of the Qur'an except chapter 9 (which starts with verses about warning pagans) begins with the phrase: "In the Name of God, the all‑Compassionate, the all‑Merciful". Yet the number of repetition of this phrase in the Qur'an is equal to the number of chapters i.e. 114, since in the chapter 27 this phrase occurs twice. It is noteworthy that although one of the things attributed to God in Islam is the wrath (ghadab), its application is much more limited compared to His mercifulness and love for His creatures. Indeed, His wrath is only for those who deliberately disbelieve or commit evil actions. This is an idea that all Muslims agree and is clearly expressed in many sources. I would like here just to mention only one profound statement. In a well‑known prayer, Jushan al‑Kabir, God is addressed as the one "whose mercy has preceded His wrath".
    As we will see later, this wrath or anger is also out of His love and mercy. If His love or mercy did not exist He would not care at all. It is like a father who becomes angry with his son when he does something wrong, because he has care and concern for his son and his entire family, because he wants his son to correct his behaviour and set a lesson for other children not to copy that wrong act. :P
    God has different levels or degrees of love for His creatures. One is His general and encompassing love that includes all beings. If there were no such love nothing, would be brought into being. This love includes even wrongdoers, since they also manifest or represent some stages of goodness in their essence and this is that aspect of their being which is loved by God, though it might be overwhelmed by the demonic aspect of their characters and therefore they might be overall hated.
    A higher level of Divine love is His love for true believers, those who believe in Him, the ultimate Truth and do good deeds. Those are the people "He loves and who love Him" (5:54). In the Qur'an, we find that God loves "the doers of justice" (5:42; 8:60; 9:49), "those who purify themselves" (9:108), "the pious" (3:76; 9:4 & 7), "those who do good (to others)" (5:13 & 93; 3:134 & 148; 2:195) "those who trust (Him)" (4:35) "the patient" (3:146) and "those who repent very much and purify themselves" (2:222).
    It is noteworthy that in the Qur'an in many cases God's displeasure is described not by focusing on His hatred, but rather indirectly by phrases, such as "God does not love any ungrateful (or unbeliever) sinner" (2:276), "God does not love the unjust" (3:57&1140), "surely, God does not love him who is proud, boastful" (4:36) and "surely God does not love him who is treacherous, sinful" (4:107).
    According to Islam, the highest level of Divine love for any creature is His love for perfect human beings, such as prophets. The Prophet Muhammad has a special place in this regard. One of the well known titles of him is Habib Ullah, which means the beloved of God. In a famous Divine saying God addresses the Prophet, "If thou were not, I would not have created the heavens." As S.H. Nasr and many others have indicated, "Muslim saints over the centuries have seen in the love of God for the Prophet and in his love for God the prototype of all love between man and his creator". [5]
    Similar to what we saw earlier in the case of Divine love, human love for God, for His creation, for good deeds, and for each other plays a crucial role in the Islamic world‑view, especially in theology, mysticism and ethics. Indeed, love for the truths embodied in the religion builds up the faith. For Muslim theologians, and indeed inspired by the Qur'an, although faith is based on knowledge of the religious facts, it is not reducible to that knowledge. There might be people who have knowledge of the religious facts and are confident about them but still do not commit themselves to any faith. The faith and belief only come when a person voluntarily commits himself to acceptance of articles of faith and does not refuse to follow them. In other words, the faith is there only when one loves the religious beliefs and not just when one comes to know them. The Qur'an says:
    And they denied them (Divine signs or miracles) unjustly and proudly while their soul had been certain about it. (27:14)
    The prototype example of those who know very well but refuse to practice what they have known is Iblis, the great Satan. According to Islamic sources, Iblis does whatever he does out of arrogance and selfishness, not out of ignorance.
    Thus, a person becomes faithful and a believer only when he has respect and love for certain facts i.e. articles of faith. We read in a famous hadith that the Prophet Muhammad asked his companions of "the firmest handhold of faith". They suggested different things like prayer and hajj. When they could not give the appropriate answer the Prophet said:
    "The firmest handhold of faith is to love for the sake of God and to hate for the sake of God, to befriend God's friends and to renounce His enemies." [6]
    The same idea is emphasised by Imams of the Household of the Prophet. For example, Fudayl ibn Yasar, a disciple, asked Imam Sadiq whether love and hatred derive from faith. Imam replied: "Is faith anything but love and hate?" [7] The same hadith is narrated from Imam Baqir. It is also narrated that Imam Baqir said: "The faith is love and love is the faith." [8]
    Notes:
    [1] It has to be noted that Muslim mystics usually speak of manifestation (tajalli) rather than creation (khalq).
    [2] Avicenna, 1956, p.369
    [3] Avicenna, 1375 A.H., Vol. 3, p.359
    [4] al Shirazi, 1378 A.H., Vol. 2, p.274
    [5] Nasr, 1989, p. 321
    [6] al‑Kulayni, 1397 A.H., Kitab al‑Iman wal‑Kufr, "Bab al‑Hubb fi Allah wal‑Bughd fi Allah", no. 6, p.126.
    [7] Ibid., no. 5 , p. 125.
    [8] Al‑Majlisi, 1983, Kitab al‑Iman wal‑Kufr, "Bab al Hubb fi Allah wal‑Bughd fi Allah", lxvi, p. 238.
    Excerpt from the book "Perspectives on the Concept of Love in Islam" by Mahnaz Heydarpoor
    http://www.al-islam.org/love_in_islam/
  18. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Endtimes in Iran's True Islamic Movie “muhammad (pbuh&hp)”   
    Yes, as mentioned in the presstv link I shared, it will be released in Persian, Arabic and English.
  19. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Endtimes in Iran's True Islamic Movie “muhammad (pbuh&hp)”   
    Iran Slaps the US Blasphemous Movie by Producing a True Islamic Movie “MUHAMMAD (PBUH&HP)” Based On his factual Life and Struggle

    (Abu Talib in Prophet Muhammad Movie)
    As anger is at its peak all around the Islamic world at the US produced anti-Islam movie that offended Prophet Mohammad (pbuh), award-winning Iranian director Majid Majidi announced that his new movie on Prophet Mohammad’s life is almost completed.
    The movie, which cost over 30 million dollars – the highest budget spent on a film in Iran in the past two years – is a three part historical epic that narrates the prophet of Islam’s childhood, specifically before he was 12 years old, that before the revelation, and his life after revelation and the spread of Islam.
    The shooting of the fim started last October in south Iran, and the movie is expected to be broadcast in December.
    Iranian directors had issued a statement on Friday , condemning the “Innocence of Muslims” film that insulted the Islamic Prophet, reassuring that “such a move would never harm the radiant face and image of Prophet Mohammad”.
    In a separate statement Majid Majidi also condemned the move, saying that “those who have produced the sacrilegious film intend to portray Islam and its prophet as a Taliban-like sect, but to no avail.”
    According to Fars news agency, “the statement further blamed the regional dictators who have been recently overthrown by their people for such a desecration of Islam, cautioning that their lack of action in previous cases has emboldened such arrogant individuals”.
    Majid is among the one of the Best , Well renowned Directors of the World .
    Majid was Born in an Iranian middle-class family, he grew up in Tehran and at the age of 14 he started acting in amateur theater groups. He then studied at the Institute of Dramatic Arts in Tehran.
    Amin Tarokh, Mehdi Pakdel and Sareh Bayat along with a number other actors have joined the cast of the Iranian blockbuster “Muhammad (S)”, which is being made by writer-director Majid Majidi.
    This film will depict the life of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (S) from the age of 12 until his appointment to prophethood.
    “Havana File” actor Tarokh will play the role of Abd al-Muttalib, the grandfather of the Prophet Muhammad (S), the Public Relations Office of the film announced on Monday.
    Pakdel, best known for his career in theater performances, will play the Prophet’s uncle Abu Talib opposite Pantea Mehdinia who will play his wife, Fatimah bint Asad.
    Bayat, who rose to fame in “Nader and Simin, a Separation”, will act in the role of Halimah, the wet nurse of Muhammad (S) in childhood. Jafar Qasemi will appear as her husband Harith.
    Actor of “Bride of Fire”, Hamid Farrokhnejad, has already landed the role of Abu Sufyan, one of the leading opponents of the Prophet (S) before accepting Islam.
    Rana Azadivar, who acted in “About Elly” and “Lizard”, will appear as Uma Jamil, wife of Abu Lahab, a major leader of the Quraysh tribe in Mecca, opposite Mohammad Asgari who will play Abu Lahab.
    Other members of the cast include Mina Sadati, who will appear as Aminah, the mother of the Prophet (S) and Hamidreza Tajdowlat, who will play the role of his uncle Hamzah that had been played by the U.S. actor Anthony Quinn in Moustapha Akkad’s “The Message”.
    Mohsen Tanabandeh as the Jewish merchant Samuel, Sadeq Hatefi as the Christian monk Buhayra and Hedayat Hashemi as the released slave Hanatah are other members of the cast.
    The cast members have been selected under the supervision of Majid and the Italian makeup artist Giannetto De Rossi.
    A number of prominent cineastes from around the world have agreed to work on the film.
    After the Iranian Revolution in 1979, his interest in cinema brought him to act in various films, most notably Mohsen Makhmalbaf’s Boycott in 1985.
    In 1998, Majidi directed the film Children of Heaven, which was nominated to receive the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Though it lost to the Italian film Life Is Beautiful by Roberto Benigni, Children of Heaven is the first Iranian film to have been nominated by the Academy.
    Majidi has directed several other feature films since Children of Heaven: The Color of Paradise in 2000, Baran in 2001, and The Willow Tree in 2005; alternate English title One Life More). He also recently directed a feature-length documentary titled Barefoot to Herat which chronicles life in refugee camps and the city of Herat during and after the anti-Taliban offensive of 2001.
    In 2008, Majidi’s acclaimed film The Song of Sparrows was the opening film of the Visakhapatnam International Film Festival in India .[1]
    Majid Majidi was one of five international film directors invited by the Beijing government to create a documentary short film to introduce the city of Beijing, in preparation for the 2008 Summer Olympics which was held in the Chinese capital; the project was titled “Vision Beijing”.[2]
    Majidi pulled out of a Danish film festival in protest against the publication in Denmark of cartoons satirizing the Prophet Muhammad. Majidi stated that he was withdrawing “to protest against insulting any religious belief or icon”.[3] Majidi writes, “I believe in God and live with my beliefs in every single moment of my life. I would like to protest against insulting any religious belief and icon. For this reason, I would like to announce my withdrawal from your festival.”
    http://jafrianews.com/2012/09/17/iran-slaps-the-us-blasphemous-movie-by-producing-a-true-islamic-movie-muhammad-pbuh-based-on-his-factual-life-and-struggle/
    You can see images of the making of the movie there.. I couldn't save and upload them.. sorry
  20. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Naqi Zaidi in Divine Love   
    Love as the Highest Reason for Creation
    In early kalam (Islamic theology), a heated debate started on the purpose behind God's creations and acts. Some theologians thought that the attribution of reason or purpose to His deeds leads to the assumption that God is in need of His creatures and He creates them to meet some needs, just like a human being who, say, works to earn money, or studies to learn. However the dominant view, especially among those who have had a more rationalistic approach like Nasir ul‑Din al‑Tusi has always been that God is the Wise (hakim), so whatever He does is for some exactly and carefully pre‑studied purposes. He never does something arbitrarily or in vain. It is asserted in the Qur'an that, "What! Did you then think that We had created you in vain...?" (23:115)
    Of course, it is clear that God Himself does not gain anything from His creatures, nor from His act of creation. This is not only because He is completely free from any sort of need, but also because it is logically impossible that a given effect would have any type of influence on its (existential) cause. Whatever the effect has is received from the cause and it would be circular to suppose it otherwise. God has not created the universe to make some benefits for Himself, but rather to give benefits. A popular Persian poem says:
    "I have not created the creation to get some benefits,
    I have created people to show them my generosity."
    There is a famous divine saying (hadith qudsi) which can probably be found in all books written about the goal of creation in Islam. According to this hadith, God says: "I was a hidden treasure; I loved to be known. Hence I created the world so that I would be known."(My translation) The Arabic original term for "loved" is derived from the root hubb, which means to like or to love. In other words, hubb is a general concept that can belong to simple things such as preferring some types of food (which in English could be translated as 'would like') or to the most important things in one's life such as the intensive desire for someone or some ideals as the beloved to the extent that one might even be ready to be destroyed in order to please the beloved or secure it. Hubb in such cases can be translated into 'love'. There is another term in the Islamic culture which is sometimes used in Arabic and more commonly in Persian to mean the intensive love i.e. 'ishq :wub: There is also wudd which means mostly friendship and affection.
    Thus, a question arises: Why did God love to be known? Certainly, God has no desire for fame. The purpose behind His love to be known is understandable by considering the fact that God who is the Wise, the Compassionate and the Omnipotent creates the universe and particularly human beings to give them the maximum grace and perfection that they have the capacity for receiving. Of course, the perfection of any kind of being is decided by the degree of its similarity or closeness to God, and the most important factors in this are love of God, and prior to that knowledge of God, since there can be no love without knowing the beloved subject. [1]
    Since the reason for loving something is nothing other than the apprehension by the lover of the beauty and perfection or more generally the goodness of the beloved, the greatest possible love is certainly the love of God for Himself. God is the most beautiful and the most perfect being and His apprehension of Himself is also the best apprehension, so His love for Himself and His joy are the most intensive ones. Avicenna writes:
    "The necessarily existent (Wajib al‑wujud) that has the highest perfection, beauty and brightness and perceives of Himself as so with a complete perception ... is in Himself the greatest lover and the greatest beloved and has the greatest joy ..." [2]
    Elsewhere he says:
    "The being that has the greatest joy in respect to something is the First (al‑Awwal) in respect to Himself, since He has the greatest understanding and has the greatest perfection." [3]
    Sadr ud‑din al‑Shirazi, known as Mulla Sadra and the founder of the school of al‑hikmah al muta'aliyah, makes the same point:
    "What causes love is what is received or will be received from the beloved. The higher goodness and more intensive existence the more deserving for being loved and the greater love for goodness. Now the being, which is free from potentiality and contingency, due to its ultimate goodness, has the ultimate level of being loved and the ultimate level of loving. Therefore, His love for Himself is the most perfect love and the most loyal one." [4]
    He also adds that since God is the Simple (not compound, without any parts) and Divine attributes are not additional (or accidental) to His essence in existence (the idea which is greatly accepted by Muslim philosophers and the majority of theologians and known as the unity of His essence and His attributes), His love is identical to His essence. In this way, one can justifiably say that He is love as He is knowledge and life.
    God's love for the world in general, and human beings in particular is unanimously believed and emphasised by all Muslims. Indeed, one of the God's names is al‑Wadud, He who loves. This is in addition to those names which imply His love for creatures, such as al‑Rahman and al‑Rahim meaning the all‑Compassionate, the all‑Merciful. Every chapter of the Qur'an except chapter 9 (which starts with verses about warning pagans) begins with the phrase: "In the Name of God, the all‑Compassionate, the all‑Merciful". Yet the number of repetition of this phrase in the Qur'an is equal to the number of chapters i.e. 114, since in the chapter 27 this phrase occurs twice. It is noteworthy that although one of the things attributed to God in Islam is the wrath (ghadab), its application is much more limited compared to His mercifulness and love for His creatures. Indeed, His wrath is only for those who deliberately disbelieve or commit evil actions. This is an idea that all Muslims agree and is clearly expressed in many sources. I would like here just to mention only one profound statement. In a well‑known prayer, Jushan al‑Kabir, God is addressed as the one "whose mercy has preceded His wrath".
    As we will see later, this wrath or anger is also out of His love and mercy. If His love or mercy did not exist He would not care at all. It is like a father who becomes angry with his son when he does something wrong, because he has care and concern for his son and his entire family, because he wants his son to correct his behaviour and set a lesson for other children not to copy that wrong act. :P
    God has different levels or degrees of love for His creatures. One is His general and encompassing love that includes all beings. If there were no such love nothing, would be brought into being. This love includes even wrongdoers, since they also manifest or represent some stages of goodness in their essence and this is that aspect of their being which is loved by God, though it might be overwhelmed by the demonic aspect of their characters and therefore they might be overall hated.
    A higher level of Divine love is His love for true believers, those who believe in Him, the ultimate Truth and do good deeds. Those are the people "He loves and who love Him" (5:54). In the Qur'an, we find that God loves "the doers of justice" (5:42; 8:60; 9:49), "those who purify themselves" (9:108), "the pious" (3:76; 9:4 & 7), "those who do good (to others)" (5:13 & 93; 3:134 & 148; 2:195) "those who trust (Him)" (4:35) "the patient" (3:146) and "those who repent very much and purify themselves" (2:222).
    It is noteworthy that in the Qur'an in many cases God's displeasure is described not by focusing on His hatred, but rather indirectly by phrases, such as "God does not love any ungrateful (or unbeliever) sinner" (2:276), "God does not love the unjust" (3:57&1140), "surely, God does not love him who is proud, boastful" (4:36) and "surely God does not love him who is treacherous, sinful" (4:107).
    According to Islam, the highest level of Divine love for any creature is His love for perfect human beings, such as prophets. The Prophet Muhammad has a special place in this regard. One of the well known titles of him is Habib Ullah, which means the beloved of God. In a famous Divine saying God addresses the Prophet, "If thou were not, I would not have created the heavens." As S.H. Nasr and many others have indicated, "Muslim saints over the centuries have seen in the love of God for the Prophet and in his love for God the prototype of all love between man and his creator". [5]
    Similar to what we saw earlier in the case of Divine love, human love for God, for His creation, for good deeds, and for each other plays a crucial role in the Islamic world‑view, especially in theology, mysticism and ethics. Indeed, love for the truths embodied in the religion builds up the faith. For Muslim theologians, and indeed inspired by the Qur'an, although faith is based on knowledge of the religious facts, it is not reducible to that knowledge. There might be people who have knowledge of the religious facts and are confident about them but still do not commit themselves to any faith. The faith and belief only come when a person voluntarily commits himself to acceptance of articles of faith and does not refuse to follow them. In other words, the faith is there only when one loves the religious beliefs and not just when one comes to know them. The Qur'an says:
    And they denied them (Divine signs or miracles) unjustly and proudly while their soul had been certain about it. (27:14)
    The prototype example of those who know very well but refuse to practice what they have known is Iblis, the great Satan. According to Islamic sources, Iblis does whatever he does out of arrogance and selfishness, not out of ignorance.
    Thus, a person becomes faithful and a believer only when he has respect and love for certain facts i.e. articles of faith. We read in a famous hadith that the Prophet Muhammad asked his companions of "the firmest handhold of faith". They suggested different things like prayer and hajj. When they could not give the appropriate answer the Prophet said:
    "The firmest handhold of faith is to love for the sake of God and to hate for the sake of God, to befriend God's friends and to renounce His enemies." [6]
    The same idea is emphasised by Imams of the Household of the Prophet. For example, Fudayl ibn Yasar, a disciple, asked Imam Sadiq whether love and hatred derive from faith. Imam replied: "Is faith anything but love and hate?" [7] The same hadith is narrated from Imam Baqir. It is also narrated that Imam Baqir said: "The faith is love and love is the faith." [8]
    Notes:
    [1] It has to be noted that Muslim mystics usually speak of manifestation (tajalli) rather than creation (khalq).
    [2] Avicenna, 1956, p.369
    [3] Avicenna, 1375 A.H., Vol. 3, p.359
    [4] al Shirazi, 1378 A.H., Vol. 2, p.274
    [5] Nasr, 1989, p. 321
    [6] al‑Kulayni, 1397 A.H., Kitab al‑Iman wal‑Kufr, "Bab al‑Hubb fi Allah wal‑Bughd fi Allah", no. 6, p.126.
    [7] Ibid., no. 5 , p. 125.
    [8] Al‑Majlisi, 1983, Kitab al‑Iman wal‑Kufr, "Bab al Hubb fi Allah wal‑Bughd fi Allah", lxvi, p. 238.
    Excerpt from the book "Perspectives on the Concept of Love in Islam" by Mahnaz Heydarpoor
    http://www.al-islam.org/love_in_islam/
  21. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Hameedeh in Divine Love   
    Love of Allah   [...]   1. It is narrated that Allah, the Exalted, revealed to Prophet Dawud (‘a) saying, “O Dawud! My remembrance (dhikr) is for those who remember Me (dhakirin), My paradise is for the obedient ones (muti’in), My love (hubb) is for those who yearn for Me (mushtaqin); while I am specifically for the lovers (muhibbin).” 3   2. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “Love is better than fear (khawf).” 4   3. Muhammad bin Ya’qub al-Kulayni reports from Imam as-Sadiq (‘a), “There are three types of worshippers (‘ubbad); a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of fear; this is the worship of the slaves. A people who worship Allah, the Blessed, the Exalted, for reward; this is the worship of the merchants. And a people who worship Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, out of love; this is the worship of the free people, and it is the best kind of worship (‘ibadah).” 5   4. Al-Kulayni also narrates from Holy Prophet (S) , “The best of the people is he who is passionately in love with worship (‘ibadah), embraces it, loves it from his heart, applies his body to it and attends to it, such that he is not bothered in which condition he is in this world, in difficulty or in ease.” 6   5. Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) says: “The secret conversation of those who have attained thorough recognition of Allah (‘arifin) revolves round three principles: fear (khawf), hope (raja’), and love (hubb). Fear is the subsidiary of knowledge (‘ilm), hope is a subsidiary of certainty (yaqin), and love is a subsidiary of recognition (ma’rifah). The sign of fear is taking flight (harab) {from the anger of Allah}; the sign of hope is seeking (talab); and the sign of love is to give preference to the Beloved over everything other than Him.   Thus, when knowledge is actualized in the breast (sadr), he would have fear (khawf); and when the fear gets firm, he would take flight (harab); and if he takes flight, he would attain salvation (najat); and when the light of certainty shines on his heart, he would witness the grace (fadl), and when he is able to see the grace, he would become hopeful; and when he experiences the sweetness of {the state of} hope, he would seek (talaba); and if he succeeds in seeking, he would find (wajada).   When the light of recognition (ma‘rifah) is disclosed (tajalla) to the heart (fu’ad), the breeze of love is stirred up (haja); and when the breeze of love is stirred up, he would become intimate with the patronage (dilal) of the Beloved, and prefer him over everything other than Him, and carry out His orders.   The parable of these three principles is that of the holy Sanctuary (haram), the sacred Mosque (al-masjid), and the ka‘bah; whoever enters the haram would be safe from the creatures; and whoever enters the masjid his limbs would be guarded from being employed by him in sinning; and whoever enters the ka‘bah his heart would be protected from being occupied by him with the remembrance of other than Allah.” 7   6. The Holy Prophet (S) is related to have said, “Prophet Shu’ayb (‘a) wept out of love of Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, until he lost his sight…, so Allah revealed onto him saying, ‘O Shu‘ayb! If this was out of fear of the Fire, then I have protected you from it; and if it was out of eagerness for the Heaven, then I have permitted you {to enter it}.’ So he said, ‘O Allah, O my Master, You are aware that I did not weep out of fear of Your fire, nor out of eagerness for Your heaven, but {because} Your love has engaged my heart such that I cannot endure {it} until I see You.’ So Allah, the Majestic, revealed to him saying, ‘If this is the case, then because of this I will make the one who spoke to Me (kalimi), Musa bin ‘Imran, to be at your service.” 8   7. A phrase in the book of Prophet Idris (‘a) read, “Blessed are a people who worshipped Me out of love, and took Me as {their} lord and nourisher, and kept awake at night and persisted during daytime in acquiring My pleasure without fear or eagerness, nor out of fear of the Fire or aspiration of the Heaven, but due to {their} sincere love, firm resolution, and detachment from all other Me.” 9   Imam al-Husayn (‘a) says in the supplication of ‘arafah, “Blind is the eye which does not see You watchful over itself, and the bargain of a servant for whom You have not allotted a share from Your love is in loss.” 10   Belief and Love   It has appeared in the Islamic sources that belief is nothing but love. Imam al-Baqir (‘a) says: “Belief (Iman) is love (hubb) and hatred (bughd).” 11   Fudayl bin Yasar reports, “I asked Abu ‘Abdillah {as-Sadiq} about love and hatred whether they are part of belief. He replied, ‘And is Iman other than love and hatred?’”12   Imam as-Sadiq (‘a) has also said, “Is religion (din) other than love? Allah, the All-mighty, the Majestic, says: ‘Say, ‘If you love Allah, then follow me; Allah will love you.’ 13 ” 14   Imam al-Baqir (‘a) is reported to have said, “Religion is the love, and love is the religion.” 15   The Pleasure of Love   If worship is out of love, eagerness and yearning, then there is no pleasure and sweetness above it. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), who is among those who had tasted the sweetness of love and remembrance of Allah, says: “O Allah… how pleasant is the taste of Your love, and how sweet is the drink of Your proximity.” 16   Indeed such a sweetness and pleasure dwells in the hearts of the friends (awliya’) of Allah. It is not something which occurs to them at times and goes away at other times. When the sweetness of the love of Allah settles in the heart of a person, then such a heart is the one inhabited by the love of Allah. And Allah shall never punish a heart inhabited by His love and in which the sweetness of His love has settled.   Imam ‘Ali (‘a) says: “O Allah, by Your might and glory, I have loved You with a love whose sweetness has settled in my heart. And the hearts of those who confess Your Oneness cannot believe that You hate Your lovers.” 17   Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (‘a) says regarding this steady and established state of the Divine love, “By Your might, O my Master, even if You drive me away, I will not leave Your door, and I will not cease to compliment You, because of what I have come to know of Your generosity and kindness.” 18   This is one of the most eloquent expressions describing the profundity of love and its abiding in the heart, such that it would not disappear from it or change even if his Master were to drive him away and distance him from His proximity. And far it is from Him that He should do that with a servant in whose heart His love has dwelt.   When one experiences the taste of the love of Allah, and the pleasure of intimacy with Him, he would not prefer anything over Him. Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a), the leader of the lovers, says: “O Allah, who can have tasted the sweetness of Your love, then wanted another in place of You? And who can have become intimate with Your nearness, then sought removal from You?” 19   The reason behind the difference of the people in relation to their goals and views about life is that they are deprived of the pleasure of the love of Allah. Otherwise those who have experienced such a pleasure do not seek anything else in life after this.   In the supplication of ‘arafah, Imam Husayn bin ‘Ali (‘a) says: “What has he found one who has lost You? And what has he lost one who has found You?” 20   Imam Zayn al-’Abidin (‘a) seeks forgiveness from Allah for every pleasure other than the pleasure of the love of Allah, and for every occupation other than the remembrance of Allah, and from every happiness other than that of the proximity to Allah; not because Allah has prohibited His servants from all this, rather because of the fact that all this is the result of the distraction of one’s heart from Allah, and of its occupation with other than His remembrance even for a short time; whereas a heart which has experienced the pleasure of the love of Allah is never distracted from Him.   In fact, the dynamic force behind every action and endeavour in the life of the friends of Allah is the love of Allah, the Exalted, His remembrance and obedience. Anything beside this is seen as diversion from Allah. Hence, Imam as-Sajjad (‘a) seeks Allah’s forgiveness for all this and says: “I pray forgiveness from You for every pleasure other than that of Your remembrance, and for every ease other than that of intimacy with You, and for every happiness other than that of proximity to You, and for every occupation other than obeying You.” 21   [...]     3. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.226.   4. Ibid, vol.78, pg.226.   5. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.84.   6. Ibid, vol.2, pg.83.   7. Misbah al-Shari’ah, pg.2 3.   8. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.12, pg.380.   9. Ibid, vol.95, pg.467.   10. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   11. Ibid, vol.78, pg.175.   12. Usul al-Kafi, vol.2, pg.125.   13. Qur’an, 3:31.   14. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.69, pg.237.   15. Nur at-Thaqalayn, vol.5, pg.285.   16. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.26.   17. Munajat Ahl al-Bayt, pg.96 97.   18. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.98, pg.85.   19. Bihar al-Anwar, vol.94, pg.148.   20. Ibid, vol.98, pg.226.   21. Ibid, vol.94, pg.151.   To read more, please see; http://www.al-islam.org/supplication-in-the-eyes-of-ahlalbayt-muhammad-mahdi-al-asifi/divine-love-supplications-ahl-al-bayt-
  22. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Haimi in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
    sorry this is not a hijabi yet. but I have to share it
     

  23. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Haimi in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
  24. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Haimi in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
    A pic from Quds day in Turkey;
     

     
    :wub:
  25. Like
    HamzaTR got a reaction from Haimi in Why Your Little Daughter Should Be In Hijab   
    duh.. the image limit.. 

     

     

     

     
     
     

×
×
  • Create New...