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In the Name of God بسم الله

Bakir

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Everything posted by Bakir

  1. Felt the need to reply to you GC, I feel sorry to hear this from you. You got all my love and support! A recurring problem I see with disabled people, or rather people with some sort of socially acknowledged disadvantage, is this condescendence received from others. This lack of positive expectations may influence the way you view and understand yourself and your actual capabilities. Guilt, anger, and anxiety become common feelings in your heart because of this. An effective support network is necessary. Some may indeed find it in a spouse, others, in friends. Nonetheless, support networks, by themselves, may also become a black hole if they don't focus on building a positive view of yourself. This pressure for marriage may become, in fact, a source of distress. Marriage can be a good source of support, but you need, above all, support, not necessarily a wife. You may need to take distance GC, for real, from everything. You may need to be alone with yourself in order to be able to listen to yourself. I hope you can see your life with other colors soon GC *hugs*
  2. Plastic is usually more dangerous for your health and the taste of your stored products (especially in relatively extreme temperatures). If one can get rid of it all, that'd be the best choice. Glass and aluminum are especially good alternatives both for taste or ecological impact. Especially recyclable aluminum containers are the safest choice (it's a light, resistant, recyclable material). Both aluminum and glass are less permeable than plastic, so the liquid they contain will keep its taste more. However, aluminum tends to add some metal-ish flavour.
  3. @Darth Vader though I had fun reading your posts, it kept me wondering how much they charge for such a service (approx. in € or US$)? In the weddings I attended, the sheykhs did it for free and celebrated with the rest of us.
  4. Yeah, I have heaed about that exact dream a lot as well. Must be a weird feeling...
  5. I love interpreting dreams hahah. That's most likely the core of the dream (I was honestly expecting it even before reaching that part of your post), and black stones coming from your mouth are the pieces of hidden truth. People standing up may be a sign of respect for your honesty. You at the hospital may symbolize the recovery (at an emotional level) after being honest. It's most likely a good dream. Nonetheless, when you threw up the black stones, was it during daytime? That's probably an indicator of how long it will take you to recocer (if it was during night, it may take you longer - until you are either understood or recovered or both).
  6. Advices like this were given taking into consideration his family (kids and wife, who are essentially vulnerable). Otherwise, if he had no family, I doubt anyone would tell him it's better to hide his disbelief in Islam. Life isn't black and white. Lying about your faith for more important issues in your life is also present in Shia Islam in the form of taqiyyah.
  7. Whatever your job is, money tends to be an efficient way to help others.
  8. Yeah, definitely first and second wave feminism is much easier to relate with, it was more clear in its discourses and was definitely more universal (meaning, it could penetrate in many more cultures, ideologies and social structures. Apart from that, at a practical level, what may be useful and helpful within reading feminist authors is to gain more confidence as a woman.
  9. Apparently yes. It's easier to think that the baathist party was insane and getting into wars they couldn't potentially win to begin with. Btw, thanks for the book recommendation, I will look into it to read into the details of such deals.
  10. Very sorry to hear... Wish her and the rest of the family all the strength and blessings possible.
  11. I don't think that feminism by itself, as a field of study and moral/ethical/social reflexion, promotes sin. Nonetheless, be careful with popular social pseudo-ideological leftist trends. I consider myself a leftist, and I admire feminism in many ways. Nonetheless, there are certain topics in which usually feminism will clash with Islam. That will most likely be gender roles and social rights/responsibilities. Is it useful to delve into feminism, study it, be active within the community and debates, etc.? Absolutely. Is it a banner? Definitely not. It is a space for reflexion, research and activism, but not an ideological banner hold by some individuals or groups. In that convenient way, there is probably room within Islam where feminism and its thinking proccess may work to question cultural structures that are not islamically necessary (forced arranged marriages, for instance).
  12. Feminism and Islam are categorically different. Islam is an already stipulated set of beliefs. Feminism is an open field with a range of topics on women's rights that, of course, strive for values such as equality and freedom. But there is an open debate on nearly everything, research, opinions, ideologies, political movements, etc. It is not stipulated, not specific as Islam may be. There is little to discuss in Islamic women's rights and moral aspects. These are defined by God, and humans (specialized scholars) do interpret these rules. Feminism has no divine source. It is a humanistic moral approach in one way, a political economical ideology in another way. It is developed, not specific. It is not a knowledge, but a field of study, research, experimentation, philosophy, etc.
  13. @Staff, why do you allow threads you know you will close in a few hours? Lol You may want to specify what is it "to be gay" in your question. The more you specify, the better people will be able to reply to you. An interesting question is also how many Shias know or have talked to a non-normative/queer Shia (and I don't count, almost no one here has got to know me decently, without a huge set of prejudices). The idea of a gay Shia, in most cases, is based in the unconceivable mix of the cliche gay character and a Shia person. And that's ridiculous, to be honest.
  14. You could be a bit more polite, as I'm investing time in posting. Learn some education, I'm not a dog whose job is to answer your questions brought in an unpolite tone. If you want to be worthy of the time of others, start by treating them with a minimum respect.
  15. This. Surprisingly enough, the establishment attending particular problems perpetuates the universal problem of inequality. Do we even have historical records of such a cruel (anti)political system in human history?
  16. According to Sharia law, a man who is a murtad fitri is to be killed, and no repentance will avoid him from capital punishment. Suggesting an apostate to visit one of the few countries in which Sharia law is applied is probably among the worst advices I have ever heard in ShiaChat. I don't even know why religion is even discussed in this thread, it's pointless. If any, we should, for once, give reason and empathy the rights to judge this moral problem. A moral problem that is rather easier to identify if you judge by the golden rule.
  17. - I can guess that lack of communication. And that, by itself, is the consequence of losing hope in communication itself (understanding). The breach is greater and greater. - I believe people "turn astray" more oftenly for what is left unsaid, than for what is publicly said. - No, though I believe it is more noticeable in my local community because there is just less fear of exposure and shame.
  18. Yeah, the ones in my local community and most of my relatives. I fear this is normal at least here where I live. Maybe in other Western countries like United Kingdom this is not like this (which I honestly doubt).
  19. Eid Mubarak to all! going to prepare some rice for the rest of meatballs I got and buy some ice cream for today Enjoy your time with your family and friends!
  20. Ironically, yes. The moral issue and desire for the real social justice is bypassed by an "utilitarian" approach in this era of pseudo/post politics, as correctly exposed by Ranciere in his short book Disagreement.
  21. Yeah, I have nothing specific related to that hadith, sorry. Looking forward to another member that can bring some info in it.
  22. Isn't the Qur'an (49:13) against racism?
  23. To put it simple, Islam looks for a society where women and men are socially different but humanely equal. Feminism considers the social differences as human differences, and brings attention to this problem. There are many ideologies and movements inside feminism, because feminism is a field of study by itself. To simplify feminism to modern 16yo girls ranting on twitter is like to simplify Islam to an ISIS terrorist.
  24. There is, notme, though it is subtly veiled. Imagine a group of people doing a strike in the street against institucionalized racism. Imagine that the strike started as a reaction against a particular case: for instance, leaked data that has shown that university teachers in the country are 95% exclusively white. What is the typical reaction to this? A law to enforce diversity for other ethnicitied in universities. Who lost this battle? The people in the strike. Their universal, ideological, social and extremely political battle against the universal racism was thwarted by a specific discriminatory solution that bring no social contribution. Rather the contrary. But it will end the strike. When governments bring such "solutions" as positive discrimination, they are also negating and thwarting the political efforts to achieve a social change in society. And not sure if morally, but that is indeed, ethically wrong. People want a space where they can discuss ideology, universal concepts, and not merely specific individual problems (which is the trend today due to global capitalism).
  25. This is a dilemma, but I want to expose the problem of both aspects. In one hand, forcing diversity as one strategy more to impose multiculturalism is politically and socially negative, as it contributes even more to the development of the empty multicultural identity that is, by itself racist (in the sense that sees the "Other" - the exotic person with a specific and structured cultural identity - as a level below him - the multiculturalist who identifies with no culture and accepts/tolerates all of them through an unperceived western/European lens). And it is politically wrong as it kills any ideological clash between cultures that should, naturally, exist. In the second hand, I was just talking about positive discrimination in another thread. That is completely an error, as it removes the focus of an universal problem (eg racism) to a specific problem (the difficult access of unemployed lesbian black mothers to jobs in the IT sector). Nonetheless, diversity shall also be looked for, but not through positive discrimination, but a genuine search for diversity because there is advantages to it (and indeed, in many cases, there is). An example of this is my sector, digital entertainment. Content creators shoulf be as diverse as possible to reach wider audiences. Products developed by multicultural teams will be more accurate (things like putting the quranic verses in a bathroom as happened with a videogame, wouldn't happen if there was at least one single person who is familiar with our culture). Another aspect to it is that the search for diversity shapes society. In videogames, the fact that universities and companies have also searched for women to work in their projects have contributed to an increase in women studying a degree in game development. This is not a casual coincidence but a achieved consequence of the search for diversity. This search has shaped the game development world for the good, and not through positive discrimination in job interviews.
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