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In the Name of God بسم الله

Bakir

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Bakir last won the day on July 27

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About Bakir

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    Shia Islam

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  1. Plastic is usually more dangerous for your health and the taste of your stored products (especially in relatively extreme temperatures). If one can get rid of it all, that'd be the best choice. Glass and aluminum are especially good alternatives both for taste or ecological impact. Especially recyclable aluminum containers are the safest choice (it's a light, resistant, recyclable material). Both aluminum and glass are less permeable than plastic, so the liquid they contain will keep its taste more. However, aluminum tends to add some metal-ish flavour.
  2. @Darth Vader though I had fun reading your posts, it kept me wondering how much they charge for such a service (approx. in € or US$)? In the weddings I attended, the sheykhs did it for free and celebrated with the rest of us.
  3. Yeah, I have heaed about that exact dream a lot as well. Must be a weird feeling...
  4. I love interpreting dreams hahah. That's most likely the core of the dream (I was honestly expecting it even before reaching that part of your post), and black stones coming from your mouth are the pieces of hidden truth. People standing up may be a sign of respect for your honesty. You at the hospital may symbolize the recovery (at an emotional level) after being honest. It's most likely a good dream. Nonetheless, when you threw up the black stones, was it during daytime? That's probably an indicator of how long it will take you to recocer (if it was during night, it may take you longer - until you are either understood or recovered or both).
  5. Advices like this were given taking into consideration his family (kids and wife, who are essentially vulnerable). Otherwise, if he had no family, I doubt anyone would tell him it's better to hide his disbelief in Islam. Life isn't black and white. Lying about your faith for more important issues in your life is also present in Shia Islam in the form of taqiyyah.
  6. Whatever your job is, money tends to be an efficient way to help others.
  7. Yeah, definitely first and second wave feminism is much easier to relate with, it was more clear in its discourses and was definitely more universal (meaning, it could penetrate in many more cultures, ideologies and social structures. Apart from that, at a practical level, what may be useful and helpful within reading feminist authors is to gain more confidence as a woman.
  8. Apparently yes. It's easier to think that the baathist party was insane and getting into wars they couldn't potentially win to begin with. Btw, thanks for the book recommendation, I will look into it to read into the details of such deals.
  9. Very sorry to hear... Wish her and the rest of the family all the strength and blessings possible.
  10. I don't think that feminism by itself, as a field of study and moral/ethical/social reflexion, promotes sin. Nonetheless, be careful with popular social pseudo-ideological leftist trends. I consider myself a leftist, and I admire feminism in many ways. Nonetheless, there are certain topics in which usually feminism will clash with Islam. That will most likely be gender roles and social rights/responsibilities. Is it useful to delve into feminism, study it, be active within the community and debates, etc.? Absolutely. Is it a banner? Definitely not. It is a space for reflexion, research and activism, but not an ideological banner hold by some individuals or groups. In that convenient way, there is probably room within Islam where feminism and its thinking proccess may work to question cultural structures that are not islamically necessary (forced arranged marriages, for instance).
  11. Feminism and Islam are categorically different. Islam is an already stipulated set of beliefs. Feminism is an open field with a range of topics on women's rights that, of course, strive for values such as equality and freedom. But there is an open debate on nearly everything, research, opinions, ideologies, political movements, etc. It is not stipulated, not specific as Islam may be. There is little to discuss in Islamic women's rights and moral aspects. These are defined by God, and humans (specialized scholars) do interpret these rules. Feminism has no divine source. It is a humanistic moral approach in one way, a political economical ideology in another way. It is developed, not specific. It is not a knowledge, but a field of study, research, experimentation, philosophy, etc.
  12. @Staff, why do you allow threads you know you will close in a few hours? Lol You may want to specify what is it "to be gay" in your question. The more you specify, the better people will be able to reply to you. An interesting question is also how many Shias know or have talked to a non-normative/queer Shia (and I don't count, almost no one here has got to know me decently, without a huge set of prejudices). The idea of a gay Shia, in most cases, is based in the unconceivable mix of the cliche gay character and a Shia person. And that's ridiculous, to be honest.
  13. You could be a bit more polite, as I'm investing time in posting. Learn some education, I'm not a dog whose job is to answer your questions brought in an unpolite tone. If you want to be worthy of the time of others, start by treating them with a minimum respect.
  14. This. Surprisingly enough, the establishment attending particular problems perpetuates the universal problem of inequality. Do we even have historical records of such a cruel (anti)political system in human history?
  15. According to Sharia law, a man who is a murtad fitri is to be killed, and no repentance will avoid him from capital punishment. Suggesting an apostate to visit one of the few countries in which Sharia law is applied is probably among the worst advices I have ever heard in ShiaChat. I don't even know why religion is even discussed in this thread, it's pointless. If any, we should, for once, give reason and empathy the rights to judge this moral problem. A moral problem that is rather easier to identify if you judge by the golden rule.
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