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In the Name of God بسم الله

Renaissance_Man

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    Renaissance_Man got a reaction from Irishman in Kafkaesque absurdity   
    118 Days, 12 Hours, 54 Minutes
    On June 21, reporter Maziar Bahari was rousted out of bed and taken to Tehran's notorious Evin prison—accused of being a spy for the CIA, MI6, Mossad…and NEWSWEEK. This is the story of his captivity—and of an Iran whose rampant paranoia underpins an ever more fractured regime.
    ...Continued at: http://www.newsweek.com/id/223862/
  2. Disagree
    Renaissance_Man got a reaction from .InshAllah. in Muslims must quit British Forces   
    I think it's pretty naive of the Iranian government to portray this as a holy war between Islam and the west. As someone else stated earlier, this reflects their own national interests. The military of most countries is an all-volunteer force and their actions are dictated by their respective government whether soldiers themselves personally like it or not. Individual soldiers usually don't have an option so I don't think it's fair to hold them accountable. In Afghanistan for example one of the objectives there is to defeat the Wahabbi Taliban/al-Qaida and help train Afghan security forces. I don't see how anybody, Muslim or not, would have a problem with this.
  3. Like
    Renaissance_Man reacted in Muslims must quit British Forces   
    Allow me to sift through most of this garbage and get down to the bottom line.
    For all of you who jumped on the "this is haram, how could I Muslim ever join the kaffir enemy" bandwagon, I invite you to look into the life of Ali bin Yaqteen who was a beloved servant of Imam Musa al Kadhim (as). Yaqteen served in the administration of Haroon al Rasheed with the permission of the Imam provided that his presence there was to help the oppressed shias. The Imam (unlike the majority of you) realized that by joining the administration of Haroon al Rasheed Yaqteen could provide more assistance to the shias than if he simply stood back and proclaimed his principles prevented him for ever assosciating with the "enemy."
    For all of you simpletons (and dear me there are quite a few on this board) I will give you the glaring parallels myself.
    Was Haroon al Rasheeds administration corrupt? ABSOLUTELY. Did Yaqteen himself engage in any of this corruption? NO. Did he help the Shias? YES
    Does the army ever experience corruption? ABSOLUTELY. Do the Muslims there have to engage in corruption? NO. Can they help Shias? YES
    [b][/b]
    The enemy of your enemy if your friend. I think I addressed all the frustrating, idiotic, nonexistent qualms that you guys seemed to have.
    The Americans are in Iraq and Afghanistan right now. No one is denying that they could have helped the uprising in the 90's or that they made up intelligence on WMD's. No one is stating that George Bush was a virtuous man who was seeking out the best interest of the Iraqi people, but he got rid of Saddam. Yeh, now there is instability and ethno/sectarian warfare in a country where all ethnicities and sects want equal representation in the government.. shocker. Yes, now there is corruption in a country that is experiencing poverty, instability, and unrest.. another shocker.
    The point is, no matter how much Hajji grumbles about the historical backdrop to the war, or no matter how many times Rubaiyat senselessly posts simplistic rhetoric that proves he has never actually opened a book.. the Americans are there and the Iraqi people are stuck in an between an oppressive autocracy (sorry to burst your bubble hajji but that is what it was) and a messy attempt at democracy. They need help and I don't see Muslims jumping up to help them. Take your principles and ramble on shiachat threads about the proper way to go about things, but you are worthless otherwise.
  4. Like
    Renaissance_Man got a reaction from Shia & Proud in Muslims must quit British Forces   
    I think it's pretty naive of the Iranian government to portray this as a holy war between Islam and the west. As someone else stated earlier, this reflects their own national interests. The military of most countries is an all-volunteer force and their actions are dictated by their respective government whether soldiers themselves personally like it or not. Individual soldiers usually don't have an option so I don't think it's fair to hold them accountable. In Afghanistan for example one of the objectives there is to defeat the Wahabbi Taliban/al-Qaida and help train Afghan security forces. I don't see how anybody, Muslim or not, would have a problem with this.
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