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baradar_jackson

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  1. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Waseem162 in RIP Fidel   
    And Fidel wasn't a godless atheist either. Everyone should read the book "Fidel and Religion" which is a series of interviews with him solely on the subject of religion.
  2. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Waseem162 in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  3. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Mansur Bakhtiari in My personal thoughts on the elections.   
    Trump is no worse than Hillary
    And Trudeau is a gay-lovin frenchie
  4. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Pearl178 in Hamza Yusuf and Black Lives Matter   
    Just wanna clarify something regarding Hamza Yusuf's comments.
     
    Although overall I agree with br Qaim and HH, I don't think it's entirely true to suggest that none of the killings are racially motivated. Although it is true that cops are killing more whites than blacks, they kill more blacks proportionate to the population. 
     
    It is a matter of unchecked power. The American public is far too trusting of authority, and this skews the judgement of jurors. A jury will never convict a cop, period. If the guy on the other side of the trigger is black, this only serves to embolden the jury's trust in the cop.
     
    BLM are led by a pair of dykes, are funded by Soros, and are in general a bunch of nuts. Every time I see someone defend them it makes me want to jump into a flame oven. But that does not mean all of what Mr. Yusuf said is correct, even if much of it was.
  5. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Qa'im in Hamza Yusuf and Black Lives Matter   
    Just wanna clarify something regarding Hamza Yusuf's comments.
     
    Although overall I agree with br Qaim and HH, I don't think it's entirely true to suggest that none of the killings are racially motivated. Although it is true that cops are killing more whites than blacks, they kill more blacks proportionate to the population. 
     
    It is a matter of unchecked power. The American public is far too trusting of authority, and this skews the judgement of jurors. A jury will never convict a cop, period. If the guy on the other side of the trigger is black, this only serves to embolden the jury's trust in the cop.
     
    BLM are led by a pair of dykes, are funded by Soros, and are in general a bunch of nuts. Every time I see someone defend them it makes me want to jump into a flame oven. But that does not mean all of what Mr. Yusuf said is correct, even if much of it was.
  6. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to Mahdi Mortezapour in RIP Fidel   
    سلام
    I do love him for his brave resistance. 
    We lack inspiring faces like him these days.
    One who fights for freedom, Independence, honor.
    God bless him
  7. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to JasmineAila in RIP Fidel   
    He is a Leader with dignity. I do respect what he stood for. His compassion for the human condition is one that many should strive for. 
    A heart of steel, si se puede..
  8. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from YAli in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  9. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to beardedbaker in Why identity politics is a cancer   
    I also think that Liberal thinking has pushed the 'live in the now'  mantra to aid its hegemonic project. How? Because 'live in the now'  thinking blinds one from the idea of 'becoming'. The path to perfection of the self and the society we live in. Working towards a better future for us all,irrespective of identity. 
    This is the path of the prophets. We are all prophets, and we are all responsible for our flock. 
  10. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Ali Hamieh in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  11. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Auriba in RIP Fidel   
    This is not an issue of ideology
     
    and if it were, I'd be careful referring folks to David Dukkkes
  12. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Panzerwaffe in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  13. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to Son of Placid in RIP Fidel   
    I don't really remember the onset of Castro, but I was 4 during the Bay of Pigs invasion, which was the all American heros going in to free the people from this tyrant. There is a report out now says Castro killed more Cubans in three years than Hitler killed Germans in six. That would be around the 600,000 mark. Interestingly enough the Cuban population grew 500,000 in the first three years of Castro, which is tremendously significant for a country only nearing 7 million, so there's no use listening to American opinion about him. The "never speak of" invasion was a bigger embarrassment than the Vietnam war. 
    The people in Florida cheered his death because they saw the worst of a revolution, escaped as refugees, and told horrible stories to their children. Those in Cuba mourned because they lost the leader that "freed" them from an American oppression. During a revolution enemies are killed afar, and up close. No leader during a revolution can afford treason nor distraction. Bad things happen.
    I visited cuba a few years back. The people are equally poor, but everybody is fed, everybody gets an education. The standard of living is far below what we know, but they don't. They are, for the most part happy, decently dressed, and friendly. I didn't know what to expect going to a communist country, but didn't see anything that would lead me to believe they weren't as free as the rest of us...with less debt. Matter of fact, the only difference I noticed between Cuba and Mexico was they didn't stamp my passport. (in case I travelled to the US in the future).
  14. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Son of Placid in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  15. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to beardedbaker in RIP Fidel   
    Good summary akhi @baradar_jackson
    Social justice has no religion. Social justice IS religion. 
    Fidel and his companieros' purpose in life was/is to establish social justice at home, and export it abroad, helping fellow revolutionaries. 
    They are more religious than 99% of Muslims. 
  16. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Martyrdom in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  17. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from beardedbaker in RIP Fidel   
    And Fidel wasn't a godless atheist either. Everyone should read the book "Fidel and Religion" which is a series of interviews with him solely on the subject of religion.
  18. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from alHussein in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  19. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Reza in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  20. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from beardedbaker in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  21. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Pearl178 in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  22. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Haji 2003 in RIP Fidel   
    I haven't read the comments but I have an inkling as to what was expressed.
     
    Just for everyone's knowledge:
     
    Right now is 2016. Cuba's revolution happened in 1959. It was a very different world.
     
    There were many movements at that point in time (particularly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America) which were neither atheistic nor anti-religious whatsoever, which because of the magnetic forces of the time (in other words: because of the political necessity of relying on the USSR for military and economic support), ended up falling under the greater umbrella of what we call "communist" or socialist movements.
     
    If we want to see what happens in those cases where such a movement does not lean on the USSR, just look at what happened in Chile with Allende.
     
    Moreover, although we obviously have our own ideology, at the same time we must recognize that other people who are in completely different situations, are not even in the position to know about our ideology, let alone make the choice to follow it or not. Do we really expect someone like Fidel to fight his revolution in the name of giving the power to the just, pious faqih? This just doesn't make sense. And if we are going to dismiss people so easily, then why did our Prophet not do the same with the ruler of Abyssinia?
     
    We have to think about these things and reflect on them deeply.
     
    Cuba before 1959 was, literally and figuratively, a giant brothel. It was prostituting itself both literally and figuratively. It was the place where American corporations acted with impunity and a place where American soldiers could "have a little fun." It was a place where the well-to-do could live a life of luxury unimaginable to most people, while the poor were treated like dogs. Fidel not only uprooted this cancerous foreign influence but also made his country much more just and equitable. These things have value. We respect these things.
     
    So to summarize:
     
    Was Fidel nominally a communist? Yes. Does that mean he is completely dismissible? No.
     
    And when assessing a leader who comes from a totally different context than us, we cannot just measure his beliefs against ours and dismiss him outright. That kind of mentality is what leads to Shias rejecting Bashar al-Assad simply because of his madhab.
     
    We know from the example of our Prophets and Imams that it is very important to find common ground with others. There is a lot to like about Fidel. He was brave, just, and did a lot of good for his people. Ideologically, obviously we have differences but at the same time we have to understand that in his time and in his country, there was no other path to take. And quite admirably, he pursued it in his own style. He didn't do everything like the Soviets would do. Who knows, maybe if he were in a later era, he would be praying for the return of Imam Mahdi while sitting next to an uncomfortable Mahmoud Abbas. It's a possibility.
  23. Like
    baradar_jackson reacted to beardedbaker in African Philosophy - Nigerian Social Theory   
    I wish I could go into more detail. I've just started to scratch the surface, and I've quickly realised that there isn't really a 'philosophy' in the classical sense. Instead it's a collection of poetry (Nigeria has a strong oral poetry tradition) , mythology, and a collection of western educated philosophers' interpretation (with a couple of surveys here and there)  of this cultural heritage. 
    They haven't really passed through the stage of theorising yet, so it's premature to call it a indigenous African philosophy. 
    I think we've got a similar issue as Muslims when it comes to applied social science and the humanities (including politics). We are yet to theorise in the fields of political and social philosophies. Even Martyr Ali Shariati's didn't get the chance to convert his collection of speeches and books into a set of socio-political general theory that could be made us of anywhere in the world. We can speculate that he would have if he wasn't murdered, but as far as I know, I haven't seen anybody turn his intellectual heritage into a coherent framework of social theories. 
    Back to Africa-there are some books that celebrate the traditional heritage and attempt to interpret it and put a philosophical spin on it, but also books that strongly criticise such attempts and consider them a waste of time.
    My interest with this post, is to draw parallels between indigenous thought from the Global South, and Islamic general socio-political theory, that has its roots in gnosticism (and the Quran). 
  24. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from Gaius I. Caesar in My personal thoughts on the elections.   
    This ain't Canada, son
  25. Like
    baradar_jackson got a reaction from It's me hello in My personal thoughts on the elections.   
    Trump is no worse than Hillary
    And Trudeau is a gay-lovin frenchie
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