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In the Name of God بسم الله

Traylian

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  1. That's perfectly ok, begnning. We all are in one way or another :)
  2. I am an American soldier. I can tell you all one thing - the idea of going to war against Iran scares the F#$K out of me! I wasn't too thrilled with the whole Iraq invasion from the start either, but it didn't scare me. I am praying every day that we stop heading down the road we are on because the destination on this road, no matter which way you look at it, is not pretty. I fear that Bush has had this in his plans all along and if it is going to happen, it will happen while he is still President.
  3. ...and Hitler was German ...and Jack the Ripper was British ...and Genghis Khan was from Mongolia ...and Bush is American... oops :) For once I agree with Bush that stopping this corporate buyout will send mixed signals and goes completely against the ideology of Democracy and the concept of free world trade. To those that oppose this I say, "Get over your paranoid stupidity!" This is a company that has been in business for a long time and is not a terrorist organization, nor does it support terrorism. It's just business!
  4. They aren't outsourcing. This is a company operating in the US that is owned by a UAE company. This doesn't mean that everyone working at the ports will now be Arabic.
  5. LOL That's actually very funny :) Anyway, the reaction to this proposed deal is PURELY paranoia. This company is merely trying to engage in capitalization and I say more power to them. The opposition to this is acting on fear and not on any educated information that this company might be linked to any terrorsit organizations.
  6. I have a question. Can any normal citizen of Iran leave Iran if they wish to? For instance, here in America homosexuality is accepted and actually thrives in some locations. If a homosexual in Iran wanted to leave and come to America to live with those who would tolerate their sexual preference, could they? I am willing to bet they can't. So, if they can't then someone who is a homosexual in Iran is trapped in a society that has no tolerance for it.
  7. HA! See, it can all be blamed on the French! :!!!: Just kidding!
  8. I am corrected. Boy was I wrong on this - sorry. Yes, Oppenheimer was of German decent and studied for a while at a German University in Goettingen well before the war, but he was born in New York and never defected to the US. So, I will be the first to admit that I was wrong and yes, it was the Americans that started the whole thing.
  9. Let me add one more comment. This should have nothing to do with whether or not the Iranians deserve to produce Nuclear weapons. Ever since the US demonstrated what these weapons could do, there have been strict regulations on when they are authorized for use (i.e. only if someone launches on us first). Every other country that builds nuclear weapons merely increases the chances of them either being used as a an unforgiveable first strike, or being aquired by terrorists. Can you guarantee that Iran will have as strict a usage policy as the US currently has? Will they have adequate security measures in place to avoid them falling into the wrong hands. Are you willing to sit back and take that risk? My god, people, this is not a childish game of, "It's not fair if you have them and I don't"!!! You can take that argument and shove it where the sun don't shine! We're talking about Weapons of MASS MASS MASS MASS Destruction! There should be no question in the mind of anyone who is capable of rational thought that there should be no more countries allowed to develop even the capability of creating nuclear weapons.
  10. Actually, that would be the Germans that began the development of the atomic bomb. Interesting guy by the name of Oppneheimer (ever heard of him?). Yeah, seems the Americans couldn't make heads or tails of the whole nuclear thing and this scientist in Germany grows a conscience after realizing that Hitler and his crew wanted to use his knowledge to build this horrible bomb, so he defects to America and we welcome him with open arms and then finish what the Germans started. There are many things in American history I am not proud of. The use of the nuclear bombs on Japan was one of them. That was a horrible attrocity. Historical evidence suggests that the Japanese were already crippled by all the conventional bombs that were dropped. The atomic bombs were unnecessary and it was merely an excuse to test the effects of these weapons on living targets.
  11. No country should have nuclear weapons. No country should have nuclear power. Every country that currently uses nuclear power should find an alternate source. No country that currently does not have nuclear power plants should ever be allowed to build them. Nuclear energy simply = destruction of everyone and everything on our planet. Nuclear waste takes thousands upon thousands of years to become non-radioactive. If you continue to produce this waste, then you are only bringing more harm to an already dying planet. Let's face it, people - this planet is doomed and it is our own damn fault.
  12. I've been away for 3 weeks so I haven't been able to reply to anyone recently. HI GREG! I look forward to debating things with you again. We definitely had some interesting discussions last year. The only new Iraqi forces that I was able to see before I left Iraq was some of the Iraqi police officers that were being used for traffic control. I must say that I respect the new Iraqi security forces very much and do not envy them. There will be difficult times ahead for quite a while - with or without US Forces there. Here's the thing I don't understand. There is a new Iraqi government, and there are plenty of Iraqi police and Iraqi Army recruits. Why does the US continue to have such a large military presence in Iraq? The majority of the instability that still exists there is only because we are still there. Before the new Iraqi government will be taken seriously in the international community, the strong presence of US military forces needs to be removed. It's like a vicious circle. We are there to help decrease the amount of instability, but the instability exists because we are there. I know things wouldn't calm down completely if we pulled out, but it would certainly be better than it is now. Our government just doesn't want it to look like we are tucking our tails between our legs and fleeing. The question is: How many US military member deaths is that good image worth? And who are we trying to fool?
  13. Hi again, Abaleada :D Nice to talk to you again. The weather was cold and wet when we left Kuwait and Germany was the same, so it was the perfect time to transition back to Germany. It started snowing as we were driving back to our base from the airport. It was so nice to see snow again. But then you get tired of it very quickly. To answer your second question, I am convinced that Bush's whole reason for the war was to line his and his buddies' pockets. And his buddies include the Saudi government (and no I didn't just formulate my opinion after watching Fahrenheit 9/11, I've always felt that way).
  14. I am in the Army and these last 5 years can't go by fast enough. Don't get me wrong, I served honorably and am proud of what I have done in the military. I saw no real action and can go to sleep at night with no nightmares of bodies disturbing it. However, the military has changed to a worldwide police force and I don't agree with it being used in that way. I joined during the last few years of the cold war and things were much less complicated then. Gee, it all changed when Bush Sr. got elected - go figure.
  15. I killed no one. I was in a signal unit. The only things that my unit shot were communications signals to a satellite.
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