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In the Name of God بسم الله

SoRoUsH

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  1. Thanks
    SoRoUsH reacted to 7ssein in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    Here are some of them. HubeAli has epub copies of translated Al Kafi, and I just copied them from in there.
  2. Like
    SoRoUsH reacted to Mahdavist in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    This right here is the core issue. From the starting point, before even truly studying a topic, we are already on the defensive because too many Muslims are sadly only searching for replies to external criticism. 
    If the foundation is weak and full of holes then you can't build anything solid on it.
    Our objective should be first and foremost to learn for the sake of gaining knowledge qurbatan ilallah. 
    Of course non Muslims and Muslims alike have questions which we can address but the objective should be to transmit what Islam says rather than to defend or justify. It is entirely possible that many will disagree and object - so be it. We don't need to reconstruct the deen just to make the critics happy. They won't be truly satisfied until we throw the Qur'an away altogether. 
    Rather let's learn the deen as it was taught by Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) through the Qur'an and the ma'soomeen (عليه السلام). Without this there is no salvation. 
  3. Thanks
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Mahdavist in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    @Moalfas
    These legalistic narrations are in no way "secrets" of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). Your argument and attempt to censor our religion is ridiculous. 
    I am not ashamed of these teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). If you are, then that's something you need to deal with. 
    Anyways, as I said earlier, if these narrations upset you, you are more than welcome to not read them. 
    Consider this post, my last response to your attempts. 
    Wassalam
  4. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    @Moalfas
    These legalistic narrations are in no way "secrets" of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). Your argument and attempt to censor our religion is ridiculous. 
    I am not ashamed of these teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). If you are, then that's something you need to deal with. 
    Anyways, as I said earlier, if these narrations upset you, you are more than welcome to not read them. 
    Consider this post, my last response to your attempts. 
    Wassalam
  5. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from 000 in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    It shouldn't be hardship. Learning and contemplating over the narrations of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) shouldn't be seen as "unnecessary hardship." 
    If it seems difficult to understand such matters, it's only because our scholars and our cultures have chosen to conveniently teach whatever's easy to teach. It's difficult now, because we have not been taught how to think about or approach these topics. 
    The fact that we hide the statements of our Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) from the public is shameful. Are we ashamed of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام)? Are we ashamed of our religion as it is? Why project a false, fake, and chopped off image of our religion to the public and not all of it? 
    Sooner or later, in the age of technology, everyone would find out all of it anyways. Instead of being ashamed, hiding and censoring our religion, we ought to be proud and learn how to properly address such issues. 
  6. Thanks
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Mahdavist in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    I've thought about it, and I'll be posting around 30+ more narrations on the topics of slaves and slave girls soon. 
    Thank you for voicing your concern.
    You are very welcome to not read them.
    Wassalam
  7. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Mahdavist in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    It shouldn't be hardship. Learning and contemplating over the narrations of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) shouldn't be seen as "unnecessary hardship." 
    If it seems difficult to understand such matters, it's only because our scholars and our cultures have chosen to conveniently teach whatever's easy to teach. It's difficult now, because we have not been taught how to think about or approach these topics. 
    The fact that we hide the statements of our Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) from the public is shameful. Are we ashamed of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام)? Are we ashamed of our religion as it is? Why project a false, fake, and chopped off image of our religion to the public and not all of it? 
    Sooner or later, in the age of technology, everyone would find out all of it anyways. Instead of being ashamed, hiding and censoring our religion, we ought to be proud and learn how to properly address such issues. 
  8. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Diaz in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    I've thought about it, and I'll be posting around 30+ more narrations on the topics of slaves and slave girls soon. 
    Thank you for voicing your concern.
    You are very welcome to not read them.
    Wassalam
  9. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from confusedandannoyed in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    I've thought about it, and I'll be posting around 30+ more narrations on the topics of slaves and slave girls soon. 
    Thank you for voicing your concern.
    You are very welcome to not read them.
    Wassalam
  10. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    In the book, he only gives the "practical benefit" excuse. 
    If a Shi'a leaves Islam as a result of reading authentic narrations from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then they didn't have faith in their hearts to begin with. They weren't Shi'a of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to begin with. 
    If parts of a religion should be censored for people to believe in it, then the whole religion should be rejected. 
    These narrations may provide legal judgements; however, sometimes they provide general statements beyond specific cases. Also, by reading many specific cases, we'll get a bigger picture.
  11. Like
    SoRoUsH reacted to Ibn al-Hussain in Issues of Slaves and Slave-girls   
    We are living in an era where the average religious Shia in the modern West is brought up believing Imam Husayn (a) stood up for "social justice" whose message is to be conveyed by giving out roses to the public, where Zaynab (a) was an "empowered independent woman", where Imam Sadiq (a) was a "scientist", where all "violent" or "unethical" laws like apostasy or blasphemy are attributed to the Sunni hadith corpus and law, and so on. So it isn't strange to see that when some people come across these type of traditions, they will have a serious identity crisis and feel like they were being duped for all these years into thinking that Shi'ism (or its sources) simply conform with most most aspects of the modern secular world. This is far from the truth and we do not need to be apologetic about it either. I always believed our young generation is completely detached from its own history and tradition, they also do not have a critical outlook of the paradigms they were brought up under and hence take the modern paradigms for granted and scrutinize the Islamic paradigms through the lens of the former. My point here is not that Islamic law cannot change, but rather I am trying to say people need to have a better grasp of the discussions at hand so that at the very least they can understand why at times there is such serious contradictions in the two worldviews.
  12. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Why do people hate the Quranist stand?   
    Because of Thaqalayn. 
    Neither the Qur'an nor the Ahlul Bayt can be properly understood without one another. 
    Quranist do not understand the Qur'an. 
  13. Completely Agree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Ruqaya101 in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    Keep an Islamic adab/virtue. 
    Remain respectful and treat your ex honourably. 
    Breakups are not easy. So, empathize and be kind.
  14. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  15. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Sirius_Bright in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    He was a Hanafi Sunni Faqih. 
    Let's not pretend everyone we like is a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) in secret.
  16. Completely Agree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Qasim-Raza in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  17. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Qasim-Raza in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    He was a Hanafi Sunni Faqih. 
    Let's not pretend everyone we like is a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) in secret.
  18. Completely Agree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  19. Thanks
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from shia farm girl in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  20. Completely Agree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Kaya in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    He was a Hanafi Sunni Faqih. 
    Let's not pretend everyone we like is a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) in secret.
  21. Haha
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Mahdavist in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    He was a Hanafi Sunni Faqih. 
    Let's not pretend everyone we like is a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) in secret.
  22. Disagree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from eThErEaL in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    He was a Hanafi Sunni Faqih. 
    Let's not pretend everyone we like is a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) in secret.
  23. Thanks
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from hasanhh in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  24. Disagree
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from eThErEaL in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
  25. Like
    SoRoUsH got a reaction from Mahdavist in Is Rumi considered a heretic?   
    Here are a few points to keep in mind:
    1. Rumi was not a follower of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
    2. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) are the source of all knwoledge.
    3. Only the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) can properly interpret the Qur'an.
    4. The Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) were not Sufis and there are a couple of narrations in which they directly denounced the Sufis. 
    Therefore, any individual, scholar, scientist, mystic, philosopher, who tries to understand and interpret the Qur'an or Islam, independently from the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), will fail and cannot be trusted.
    If Rumi's teachings do not stem from the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) or if he's teaching something that was neither taught nor endorsed by the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), then he has deviated from the Straight Path. 
     
    That being said, the article, incorrectly, puts mysticism and philosophy against the "Hadith current." This is frustratingly incorrect and irresponsible. Philosophers, as long as their views are in line with the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام), have a lot to offer. Through dissection and making connections, philosophers can effectively bring forth the roots and the implications of the teachings of Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام). 
     
    Other than the illegitimate reasons of national pride or dilution of religious teachings, we have no legitimate reasons to look beyond the Ahlul Bayt (عليه السلام) to learn about Islam, God, and love. 
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