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In the Name of God بسم الله

Learned

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  1. Like
    Learned got a reaction from 313_Waiter in The Quran   
    (bismillah)

    Calligraphy and recital of the Qur'an are a means of finding an appreciation for the words of Allah SWT. The objective behind these two forms of supplication is not to provide quantitative information. That is derived from the interpriation of the words of the Qur'an.
    In addition, there are thousands of books, translations, and interpritations where people put their feelings about the Qur'an into words and the vast majority of these are excellent sources for learning about the Qur'an. The point I was making is that the Qur'an is defined as a perfect Arabic text from God Himself, and when it is translated it ceases to be perfect and becomes limited to the interpritor's comprehension of it.
    This does not mean that one cannot learn about the Qur'an or understand its message. As I pointed out, the vast majority of Muslims worldwide do not speak Arabic, yet they have plenty of such interpritations and translations to study and learn from.
    The point is that while these sources serve the purpose of providing a means for those who do not speak Arabic to learn about the Holy Qur'an and its meaning, they do not serve the purpose of defining the Qur'an as such, and thus limiting the Qur'an to that interpritation.
    Its fairly simple. The sun is mentioned twice in this Surah. The first time is in this section:
    [shakir 18:85] So he followed a course.
    [Yusufali 18:85] One (such) way he followed,
    [Pickthal 18:85] And he followed a road
    [shakir 18:86] Until when he reached the place where the sun set, he found it going down into a black sea, and found by it a people. We said: O Zulqarnain! either give them a chastisement or do them a benefit.
    [Yusufali 18:86] Until, when he reached the setting of the sun, he found it set in a spring of murky water: Near it he found a People: We said: "O Zul-qarnain! (thou hast authority,) either to punish them, or to treat them with kindness."
    [Pickthal 18:86] Till, when he reached the setting-place of the sun, he found it setting in a muddy spring, and found a people thereabout. We said: O Dhu'l-Qarneyn! Either punish or show them kindness.
    ^Dhul Qarnayn first follows a course which leads him to the "place where the sun set, he found it going down into a black sea" or "the setting of the sun, he found it set in a spring of murky water" or "the setting-place of the sun, he found it setting in a muddy spring." This is a poetic and quite eloquent way of stating that he was heading due West in this expidition until he reached shores of the sea (or a large collection of water) on the Western side of his land which was muddy.
    There is a certian notion among Qur'anic interpriters and historians that if Thul Qarnayn is indeed Alexander the Great, then the reference to the sea of muddy water could be to Lyncnitis (now called Ochrida) West of Macedonia, the sources of which are thought to be underground springs that run through limestone regions which explain why the water could never be clear.
    The second time the sun is mentioned is in the folowing section:
    [shakir 18:89] Then he followed (another) course.
    [Yusufali 18:89] Then followed he (another) way,
    [Pickthal 18:89] Then he followed a road
    [shakir 18:90] Until when he reached the land of the rising of the sun, he found it rising on a people to whom We had given no shelter from It;
    [Yusufali 18:90] Until, when he came to the rising of the sun, he found it rising on a people for whom We had provided no covering protection against the sun.
    [Pickthal 18:90] Till, when he reached the rising-place of the sun, he found it rising on a people for whom We had appointed no shelter therefrom.
    ^Dhul Qarnayn then follows a course that leads him to the "land of the rising of the sun" or "Until, when he came to the rising of the sun" or "Till, when he reached the rising-place of the sun." This is a poetic and eloquent way of stating that he was heading East at the time and came upon a people who were totally ignorant of erecting a shelter for themselves against the sun, which Dhul Qarnayn then guided and taught to live in peace.
    I did mention his direction of travel in the interpritation I provided in post #16 although I didn't point out the direct connection to the sun's rising/setting metaphor.
    The Holy Qur'an itself states that: "He it is Who has sent down to thee the Book: In it are verses basic or fundamental (of established meaning); they are the foundation of the Book: others are allegorical. But those in whose hearts is perversity follow the part thereof that is allegorical, seeking discord, and searching for its hidden meanings, but no one knows its hidden meanings except God. And those who are firmly grounded in knowledge say: "We believe in the Book; the whole of it is from our Lord:" and none will grasp the Message except men of understanding." [Chapter 3, Verse 7]
    One only has to use their mind to differentiate, and the Qur'an refers to them as "those who are firmly grounded in knowledge." For example, the Qur'an contains statements which provide a clear and concise indication of the matter being discussed such as when the roundness of the Earth is discussed, or the Earth's rotation is discussed.
    There are other verses that clearly speak in a metaphorical fashion such as "he who shall have done an atom's weight of good, shall behold it; and he who shall have done an atom's weight of evil, shall behold it." This (obviously) does not mean that good and evil is measured in term's of an atom's weight, but rather that humanity will be held responsible for their respective actions and intentions when they are judged by Allah.
    Of course the sun cannot set (touch) on any place on Earth. Hope you understand it now.
    Fi Amanillah.
  2. Like
    Learned got a reaction from PureExistence1 in Having a wife who does not wear Hijab   
    ^Methinks you misunderstood it. It doesn't insinuate that all women are heading to hell, or that every single brother, father, and husband of those women who go to hell will share the same fate. It insinuates that those women that don't lead proper lives drag the men closest to them in their lives down with them. Is this a matter of hatred of women? Not at all. The message of the saying is that ladies have tremendous sway over their husbands, their brothers, their fathers, etc. Ladies who have pure intentions have positive effects on them, and those who have dubious intentions have negative effects on them. This is how I understood it, and regardless of whether the saying has a sound foundation or not (I don't know), I don't think it can be denied that women have considerable sway over the men closest to them. God knows all the women in my family do...
    Gosh, and to think ... All that tongue-biting for nothing. Poor tongue....
    Anyway, back to the topic, no it is not required that one divorce their wife if she refuses to wear a headscarf. However, a man should not fool himself into thinking that he will be able to change the ways of his wife after marriage if he cannot succeed in doing so before marriage. What a man can do, however, is raise a family in an Islamic environment that is conducive to Islamic behavior and habits. If your and your wife regularly socialize with non-Muslims, take part in social gatherings and activities that are not appropriate for Muslims, etc, and then expect your wife to dress in a manner that contradicts both your lifestyles, then your expectations are misplaced. Conversely, if you and your wife socialize with people who do wear proper hijab, enjoin Islamic values, go regularly to mosque, emphasize things like moderation, modestly, tahara, etc, then your wife would be more inclined to adopt hijab simply because it fits in with the atmosphere around her. Most women who do not want to wear hijab do so for social acceptance reasons, and many women who find no problems in wearing hijab do so because their lifestyle does not contradict their choice to wear it. Also, one should think of the example that parents set for their children. More important than your wife wearing hijab for the sake of hijab, is your children being raised in accordance with correct Islamic practices and values, and the foremost motivator and source of emulation and influence for children, when it comes to matters of faith and lifestyle, is their parents and environment at home.
  3. Like
    Learned got a reaction from Haydar Husayn in how to break black magic?   
    This type of "advice" is not only drowning in superstitious nonsense and idiocy, it is downright irresponsible. It's one thing if you believe in these superstitions, but to actually advise people to go to what are essentially the equivalents of witchdoctors and shamans in order to deal with real-life problems is dangerous.
    Why is it that so many Muslims cling and adhere to these backwards beliefs and superstitions, and why is it that our Ulama are more often than not tolerating if not directly promoting such backwards beliefs and delusions, instead of taking a progressive and unwitting stance against the cultural and social factors that promote such superstitions? I think that our Ulama in general have fallen far short of their obligation and responsibility in this regard, and it may very well be that they are proponents of these backwards beliefs and therefore part of the problem. It is really sad that these regressive superstitious beliefs are held many times even by educated Muslims who live in more civilized cultures, and I believe that this type of mindset is one of the foremost impediments to the advancement of Muslim societies and cultures. Muslims these days seem to be obsessed with the supernatural, with the conspiracy theories, jinns, black magic, seeing Imams in dreams, predicting qiyamat and signs of qiyamat, dream interpretation, horoscopes, fortune telling, attaching value to the valueless, and deriving meaning and belief from the meaningless, and the tragic part is that it is through these illusory beliefs that they explain the world around them, and come to conclusions, beliefs, explanations, and understandings of the world (and other things) that are wholly and completely detached from reality. This type of behavior is not only misguided, it is damaging and harmful to Muslim societies and even to the other aspects of culture that can be positive influences on people's lives.
    For God's sake people, do you think that Allah will not judge you for allowing such superstitions to influence your thinking and beliefs? Do any of you honestly believe that there is a place in religion for such nonsense? Do you think it is not ill-advised to accept superstition as a working alternative to logic, reality, and science? Do you think that you are better served in turning to "magic" to solve your problems (or the problems of others) than actually tackling them in a rational manner and addressing the actual causes of the problem itself?
    To the OP: If you think that your wife is acting weird or has some kind of a problem, then take her to a psychiatrist. Have someone with an actual medical degree examine her. Try therapy, conversation, and dialogue to get to the root of the problem. Once you identify it, work it out between you and her. Use your brain for just a second, and act rationally. Black magic won't solve anything for you, and anyone who says it does is a complete moron.
  4. Like
    Learned got a reaction from Maryammm in The Nicest Things Someone's Said To You   
    This isn't really a nice thing someone has said to me, but it was one of the most touching things I've ever heard from someone...
    I was helping my 7 year old cousin Fatima (who is an orphan - her dad abandoned their mom and her two sisters about 5 years ago) with some of her schoolwork, and as we finished up and she was putting her books back in her schoolbag, she looked up at me with beady eyes filled with tears and said in a whimpering voice "Its not fair, everyone has a daddy except us. 'Learned', please can you be my daddy?"
    I think that was the first time in my life I was lost for words. She broke my heart and I just didn't know how to answer her in that moment. Luckily, my Uncle's wife was in the room and heard what she said, and knew how to answer her.
    Still breaks my heart every time I remember it...
  5. Like
    Learned got a reaction from gogiison2 in Having a wife who does not wear Hijab   
    ^Methinks you misunderstood it. It doesn't insinuate that all women are heading to hell, or that every single brother, father, and husband of those women who go to hell will share the same fate. It insinuates that those women that don't lead proper lives drag the men closest to them in their lives down with them. Is this a matter of hatred of women? Not at all. The message of the saying is that ladies have tremendous sway over their husbands, their brothers, their fathers, etc. Ladies who have pure intentions have positive effects on them, and those who have dubious intentions have negative effects on them. This is how I understood it, and regardless of whether the saying has a sound foundation or not (I don't know), I don't think it can be denied that women have considerable sway over the men closest to them. God knows all the women in my family do...
    Gosh, and to think ... All that tongue-biting for nothing. Poor tongue....
    Anyway, back to the topic, no it is not required that one divorce their wife if she refuses to wear a headscarf. However, a man should not fool himself into thinking that he will be able to change the ways of his wife after marriage if he cannot succeed in doing so before marriage. What a man can do, however, is raise a family in an Islamic environment that is conducive to Islamic behavior and habits. If your and your wife regularly socialize with non-Muslims, take part in social gatherings and activities that are not appropriate for Muslims, etc, and then expect your wife to dress in a manner that contradicts both your lifestyles, then your expectations are misplaced. Conversely, if you and your wife socialize with people who do wear proper hijab, enjoin Islamic values, go regularly to mosque, emphasize things like moderation, modestly, tahara, etc, then your wife would be more inclined to adopt hijab simply because it fits in with the atmosphere around her. Most women who do not want to wear hijab do so for social acceptance reasons, and many women who find no problems in wearing hijab do so because their lifestyle does not contradict their choice to wear it. Also, one should think of the example that parents set for their children. More important than your wife wearing hijab for the sake of hijab, is your children being raised in accordance with correct Islamic practices and values, and the foremost motivator and source of emulation and influence for children, when it comes to matters of faith and lifestyle, is their parents and environment at home.
  6. Like
    Learned got a reaction from 000 in Hassan Nasrallah's Message To His Men(english Sub)   
    The ouster of Tufaili from Hezbollah is probably one of the most important events that helped open the path for Hezbollah to evolve as an organization. Tufaili's style of leadership was very narrow minded. He made alot of enemies in Lebanon very quickly and very early on, and instead of unifying Hezbollah as an organization, he created splinters and rivalries within it. Furthermore, his leadership style alienated people within Hezbollah areas, who began to fear that the organization was heading down a path that didn't pursue their interests.
    He didn't give any credence to the social, political, economic, millitary, cultural, or denominational factors within the country, and pursued a purely ideological strategy what was completely detached from reality. Thankfully, many within Hezbollah realized this early on, and were successfully able to elect Shaheed Abbass al Musawi as Secretary General.
    Had Tufaili continued to be Secretary General of Hezbollah, the organization would have suffered a fate simular to all of the civil war era militias, and would not exist today. He was leading it down a path of isolation and disaster.
    Today, he has resorted to some very childish and politically immature tactics in efforts to demonize Hezbollah. He has made appearances on Hariri and Lebanese-Forces television stations, and attacked the personal character and integrity of SHN as a person, as well as Hezbollah as an organization, accusing them of some of the very things Israel and the US accuse them of. He has also accused Hezbollah of seeking to protect Israel and of blasphemy because they took part in the country's elections.
    His actions have lead him to be completely isolated in Lebanon today. Where he still had a few hundred supporters at one point, today he has been completely abandoned by everyone, even those who stood with him before as even they have realized that his personal vedettas and spitefullness are more of drivers for him than even his narrow minded ideological outlook.
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