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In the Name of God بسم الله

asli_azeri

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About asli_azeri

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  • Birthday 06/27/1985

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    istanbul, Turkey

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  1. (salam) Selam brother, you can find from this link translation of Ahmet Bukhatir's ramadan nasheed also can find translation of his other nasheeds.. translation of Ramadan nasheed weeselam
  2. (salam) my favorite movies, green mile and life is beautiful.. :)
  3. (salam) Türkiyede başörtüsü yüzünden hastaneye giremeyenler mi var, böyle birşeyi ne duydum nede gördüm vesselam..
  4. (salam) sorry sister, I misunderstood your writings. :blush:
  5. (salam) selam sister, why is make-up haram? vesselam
  6. (salam) mine is water.. Water You are 37% Extroverted and 45% Chaotic
  7. Selam brother Mujahid, If you read my writing or my copy-paste properly , you will see nevruz is still celebrating in Turkey in much cities..during ottoman empire, during seljuk turks also was celebrating nevruz.how can you say that it is banned in Turkey?. if you read my writings, you will also see how nevruz celebrates in Turkey.. in the northern and eastern part of Turkey nevruz is celebrated. I am living in İstanbul since I was born. Although I live in İstanbul, when I was child and still today, we are celebrating nevruz. when I was child , we were fire light and jumping up over fire.and we paint eggs red.and we buy dried fruits and nuts and give it to our neighbors.maybe today I don't fire and jump over because I growed up anymore, I am 20 old...generally children make it...but some part of Turkey is still doing....and my grandfather and grandmother make a special thing which is made by wheat, it is called as ''Yemeni''...it is made in nevruz ...you don't say in Turkey is not celebrated nevruz. you shouldn't talk surely about you don't know anything.. I will say again, we are living in the same geography so it is normal to be effected from cultures, from each other. :) p.s: correct me please If I am wrong, you had said me that you are azeri..is it true? because when I look at your writing, I couldn't understand you are azeri or not....no offend.. :) with regards vesselam
  8. Selam aleykum wr wb brother Mazlum, yes there are lots of azeri lives in Turkey, especially north-eastern part of Turkey like Kars, Ardahan, Iğdır, and in the some city, they are abundant like İstanbul, izmir ,Ankara. all of azeri in Turkey are shia. total population of azeris are 3-4 million.. :)
  9. (salam) selam evet azeriyim, dolayısıyla caferiyim, ya sen? vesselam
  10. (salam) Brother waiting, azeris have different tradition, uzbeks have different tradition, turkmens have different tradition, kırgızs have different tradition, kazaks have different tradition, uygur have different tradition and turkey have different tradition and so on.but they are turkish.. there are sunni and shia turkish.azeris are shia but some azeris are sunni in azerbajian...some turkmen are shia but some turkmen are sunni.also some uzbeks are shia (like alevi), but some of them are sunni.some turks are shaman in the middle asia such as Syberia. as I said above they are turkish.. I am aware of you couldn't understand this due existing differences .turks are in widespread area.they have different culture and belief. but their ethnicity are turkish..is it clear? surely it is possible that azeris in İran resembles much iranian people so they have been living together several centuries in the same community... cultures are effected from each other. wit regards wesselam
  11. (salam) Nevruz Celebrations in Turkey and in Central Asia nevruz in Turkey
  12. (salam) Nevruz Celebrations in Turkey and in Central Asia The day accepted as the New Year’s Day by the Turks living in Central Asia, Anatolian Turks and Iranians is called Nevruz. It is a combination of the Persian words Nev (New) and Ruz (Day). It corresponds to March 22nd according to the Western calendar and March 9th according to the Moslem one, when the day and the night are of equal length and ıs known by such names as "Nevruz-i Sultani,” "Sultan Nevruz," "Sultan Navriz" and "Mart Dokuzu" (Ninth of March). Although it is has been claimed that Nevruz was a Persian conception, it also appears in the Twelve Animal Turkish Calendars, and had been known to the Turks and celebrated by them for a very long time. The principle view of Nevruz is that it is a celebration of independence. In other words that it marks the day of departure from Ergenekon. Hence, Nevruz has been accepted as the beginning of the new year by Turks and has still been celebrating with festivals. Among the Turkish communites of Central Asia, the Azeris, Kazakhs, Khirghiz, Türkmens, Uzbeks and Uyghur Turks, the Anatolian Turks and the Balkan Turks have kept the Nevruz traditon alive up to the present day. Kazakhstan The Kazakhs recite Mevlid prayers during the Nevruz ceremonies. Houses are spring cleaned and people wear their best clothes. During the Nevruz celebrations, people throw clay cups against walls or the furniture to break them and jump over the fire. It is known that jumping over the fire is a symbol of leaving behind the bad luck and sickness of the previous year and making a healthy start in the new one. The Kazakhs prepare a special meal during Nevruz called "Nevruz – köcö." They also prepare another meal called Nevruz soup or soft rice, "lapa," and give these to their neighbours on that day. Kyrgyzstan The Kyrgyz call the first day of the new year Nooroz, and prepare and eat a special meal called "Nooruz köcö" on that day. This is a moist syrup composed of corn or pounded wheat. "Auz köcö," which is also known as "kavut," is another special meal prepared for the day. The Kyrgyz years starts with the Nevruz festival held on the equinox, in other words the new year celebrations on March 21st. Uzbekistan In the Samarkand, Bukhara and Andican regions, Nevruz celebrations start on the day of Nevruz and continue for a full week. The people call these Nevruz festivals "Seyil Festivities," and seyil sites are filled with rides, musicians, dancers and hawkers. On the first day of the Nevruz celebrations, people move from tent to tent and extend their best wishes to each other. The food served at this festival time is a special kind of rice called "as." Tea and various fruits are also served in addition to the rice. Beside these offerings, games and sports such as "köpkari," wrestling, horse races and cockfights are organized, and plays about the Nevruz celebrations are staged. Turkmenistan Turkomans call the first day of the new year Novruz. Five or six days before Novroz, Turkoman families start cleaning their houses. Food and dishes such as Turkoman pastry, Turkoman petir, külce, fatty börek, sekseke, koko, bovursak and Turkoman rice are prepared. It is believed that preparing many different kinds of food will bring good luck for the following year. Semeni is the special food made during Nevroz. Many families come together and prepare the food in a big cauldron by adding flour and sugar to wheat. Semeni is cooked the day before it is to be eaten, and is readied for the morning of March 21st. Azarbaijan In Azarbaijan, Nevruz continues for three days. Splendid celebrations take place each year during 21-23rd March. The second most important day after Nevruz is "ahir çersenbe" (the last Wednesday). It is also called "ilin ahir tek tek." All four Wednesdays of the festival month are also important. This is called "üskü." Men visit the cemeteries on the Tuesday before "ahi çersenbe" and recite the Fatiha sura and then rerturn. Women prepare many dishes, such as halva (a dessert prepared with sugar, flour or semolina) and rice and then go to the cemetery themselves. The Koran is recited, and after prayers they give the food they have prepared to the poor and leave the cemetery after 1-2 hours. This marks the end of the Nevruz celebrations. In Azarbaijan, the night between Tuesday and Wednesday is called "ahir-çersenbe." The first thing people have to do on "ahir cersenbe" is to clean their houses and all the belongings in it. Besides the custom of burning harmal which is called "pülenberi," a special nocturnal celebration called "yeddi-levin" is organized, during which at least seven kinds of nuts have to be served. Another custom, "gapi pusma," involves young people making a wish and listening at their neighbours door. The first word they hear is regarded as prophetic of the way the coming year will pass. Another custom on "ahir çersenbe" is the game of "throwing rings in the water." A washbowl filled with water is placed in the center of a room, and girls gather around the bowl and throw their rings in it. One of the girls take out the rings one by one from the covered bowl and recites verses for each ring. The message contained in quatrain applies to the girl whose ring has been taken out. Waterfront Customs: The next day, before the sun rises, people go down to sources of fresh water and wash their hands and faces and. Girls tie their thumbs together with a cord and jump into the water. They cut the cord and throw it into the water. This is believed to bring them good luck for the following year. Those coming to the waterside pick seven small stones from the spring and place them at the bottom of the water bowl. These stones remain there until the next "ahir çersenbe." On the way home, three bramble branches are picked and brought to peoples’ houses. These branches also remain where they are hung until the next "ahir çersenbe." The day before Nevruz is called "baca-baca." Hard boiled eggs painted in different colours are given to children who visit houses one by one. On this day, children walk around in groups and chant folk sayings or songs such
  13. (salam) Brother Mujahid, yes I know azeris have been celebrating differentlly, also their celebrating is like iran.but azeris in Azerbajian is celebrating different from iran's azeris. moreover in Turkey newroz has been celebrating several centuries.. moreover Nevruz, which every society celebrates in forms peculiar to itself, still exists with traditional celebrations in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tatarstan, the Uygur region, Anatolia and the Balkans.I remember you again that all of them are turkish.. Nevruz The word Nevruz is of Persian origin and is a combination of the words “nev” (new) and “ruz” (day), meaning new day. According to the old Persian calendar, it is the first day of the year and regarded as the start of spring, when the sun enters the house of Aries. The sun gives more light and heat to the southern hemisphere until March 21, after which this applies to the northern hemisphere instead. That is why March 21 is a day to celebrate for people living in the northern hemisphere as the symbol of awakening and creation. According to Persian mythology, God created the world, man and the sun on this day. Kiyumers, the legendary Persian ruler, declared this day to be a festival when he ascends the throne. Jemshid, the symbol of magnificence in Persia, also ascended the throne on this day. In addition, Jem, the seventh grandson of the Prophet Adam, came to Azerbaijan on March 21 and declared it to be a day of celebration.
  14. (salam) Brother Mujahid, yes I know azeris have been celebrating differentlly, also their celebrating is like iran.but azeris in Azerbajian is celebrating different from iran's azeris. moreover in Turkey newroz has been celebrating several centuries.. moreover Nevruz, which every society celebrates in forms peculiar to itself, still exists with traditional celebrations in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tatarstan, the Uygur region, Anatolia and the Balkans.I remember you again that all of them are turkish.. I am adding page about this from govorment of culture and tourism of Turkey.. Nevruz The word Nevruz is of Persian origin and is a combination of the words “nev” (new) and “ruz” (day), meaning new day. According to the old Persian calendar, it is the first day of the year and regarded as the start of spring, when the sun enters the house of Aries. The sun gives more light and heat to the southern hemisphere until March 21, after which this applies to the northern hemisphere instead. That is why March 21 is a day to celebrate for people living in the northern hemisphere as the symbol of awakening and creation. According to Persian mythology, God created the world, man and the sun on this day. Kiyumers, the legendary Persian ruler, declared this day to be a festival when he ascends the throne. Jemshid, the symbol of magnificence in Persia, also ascended the throne on this day. In addition, Jem, the seventh grandson of the Prophet Adam, came to Azerbaijan on March 21 and declared it to be a day of celebration. Nevruz, which goes by various names such as Nevruz-i Sultan, Sultan Nevruz, Navrız and Mart dokuzu in Anatolia, is celebrated differently in different regions. It is also a ceremony for abundance in regions where people generally work in agriculture. It also has a faith-related significance in Alawite-Bektashi communities. In Alawite-Bektashi communities, Nevruz is the birthday of Ali, and also the day when Ali and Fatma married. In addition, it is the day the Prophet Mohammad designated Ali as his caliph after his return from the Farewell Hadj. On the morning of this day, people drink milk after the guide has read prayers. They read poems called Nevruziye, nefes (a poem read by dervishes) and Mevlit (a religious poem and prayer chanted either in memory of a dead person or to mark a special religious occasion) in memory of Ali. They visit graves with pastries that have been prepared earlier and eat these there. Ottoman sultans paid special attention to Nevruz Day. Poems in the form of the “gazel” and “kasida”, called “Nevruziye”, were presented to them on that day. In these kasidas, the main theme was trees, which put forth leaves, opening flowers, the warming of the weather and similar. It was then related for Adam was created on Nevruz Day, Noah’s Ark reached land and Ali was born and became a caliph. It was said that all creatures prostrated themselves to God on Nevruz night, and that wishes came true. Again on Nevruz Day, the chief astrologer used to present the new calendar to the sultan and receive alms. This tip was called “nevruziye baksheesh”. Pastes called nevruziye, prepared with various spices by the chief physicians of the palace, were offered to the family of the sultan and other dignitaries. The pastes prepared for this day were presented in bowls with porcelain lids, and a note stating at which the hours of the day they should be consumed was also attached. The origin of the Nevruziye paste has been traced back to the Persians by some researchers. In the time of Persians, physicians and pharmacists would gather together to prepare this special mixture. It was believed that those who ate it would be protected against all illnesses throughout the whole year. In time, this custom changed and Nevruziye became the name of a special sweet eaten on Nevruz days. Recently, as an extension of this custom, “mesir” pastes are distributed to people in Manisa on March 21. Not only Nevruz Day, but also Nevruz Night has a heavenly significance for the people of Eastern Anatolia. It is believed that all creatures and things prostrate themselves before God on this night. That day, every individual’s fortune and future for the next year is set out. People prepare for the new year by wearing new and beautiful clothes. Meals are cooked in the home, and mutual visits take place. Another custom seen in some regions of Anatolia in March is “Black Wednesday.” Various ceremonies are performed at this time, and meals prepared and eaten communally on this day, the first Wednesday in March. The young make wishes and listen at their neighbors’ doors. Another of the traditions related to Nevruz is “March thread”. Pieces of cloth are tied to trees to protect them from the sun as the weather begins to warm up as of March 21. The custom called “Mart bozumu” (breaking March) in Giresun is another of the significant traditions related to Nevruz. At this time, water from a stream is fetched and sprinkled through the local houses. A guest who brings good luck is expected to visit and say “I am breaking your March”. In the Central Anatolian region, Nevruz is called “Mart dokuzu” (nine of March). On March 21, people get up early, pay visits to graves and make wishes. The person who intends to make a wish collects forty stones from the graves and puts them into a sack. He then hangs the sack on the wall of his home, and meanwhile, makes a wish. One year later, he looks inside the sack. If the number of stones has risen to 41, he believes that his wish will come true. On the next nine of March, the stones are put back where they were taken from. On Nevruz Day, people lay their tables with an assortment of foodstuffs, play games, hold festivities, eat painted eggs and prepare large fires.
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