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In the Name of God بسم الله

Ruqaya101

Advanced Member
  • Content Count

    918
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  • Days Won

    4

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Hameedeh in What are y’all favorite cake flavors ?    
    BANANA CAKEEEE especially the ones I make!
  2. Thanks
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Muhammad ibn Abdul Wahhab in Iraq Protests 2019-2020   
    They're not, unfortunately.
    My family members are also out there, protesting. I see no effect of it, besides more death.  
  3. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from 3wliya_maryam in Halal and Haram Love   
    You can still look at someone and not develop any feelings because due to work/education systems, you must learn to maintain a professional outlook, and keep your main focus on what you should be doing. In western societies, especially. 
    I do agree that if you allow yourself to develop it, then that is a persons action. But actually a lot of crushes just arise because of a simple word, it doesnt even need to be looks, it can be personality or knowledge, and so on.
    Theres a lot of online crushes too, even when theres formal conversations maintained.
  4. Thanks
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Bookworm79 in Halal and Haram Love   
    Hmm, I wouldn't even like to refer it as a "crush" honestly. Its just an increase in dopamine and some infatuation. But, it is halal (without the harram action initiation) , at the end of the day, its just a natural aspect of being human, though as people get older (im assuming the sister here, is young), don’t really develop any infatuations, maybe attractions. I guess, the older you get, the more you focus on the outlook of your life, etc.
    To the OP, since youre asking if its halal or harram, just saying that the natural part of it is natural, doesnt mean that one should now be okay with feeling that infatuation, this is where perhaps you should lower your gaze.
    Though, even hearing someone can cause an infatuation, someones maturity, knowledge, etc. I guess as long as you don’t act upon any feelings or desires, youre good.
  5. Thanks
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Jannat786 in What are the signs of a toxic relationship?   
    You've mentioned in a thread before that he has some anger management issues, you need to know if you're able to handle that in itself, let alone considering whether its a toxic relationship or not. You've mentioned that you walk egg shells around him and that just shows you're not comfortable. And I have given you my opinion and advise on this in our PM's. 
    You need to start thinking very clearly for what you want and where you want to head off. You're still young regardless of cultural perspectives and I completely understand how that is easier said than done, but have faith in Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى), and everything will be ok!
    Sit down and think about what the future would look like with this man, the kids you'd have, the house you'll be in, whats likely the treatment he will give you.
  6. Like
    Ruqaya101 reacted to Muslimthought97 in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    Regarding the staying in contact debate, that I believe is down to the situation. If two people are sick of eachother they may decide to not talk and thats fine, but not be rude. If two people had separated due to differences or circumstances and it wasnt a nasty ending there can be some level of communication.
    I have been in a situation before with someone for 5 years, and while we split and had a hard time at the start we sometimes speak to check on eachother and see if our lives are going in the right direction, sometimes if any advice is needed. don’t forget it depends how long you spent with this person, if its a few years then you shared your thoughts, dreams and aspirations with them so they by default form a small part of you and would know you best. 
  7. Completely Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to SoRoUsH in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    Keep an Islamic adab/virtue. 
    Remain respectful and treat your ex honourably. 
    Breakups are not easy. So, empathize and be kind.
  8. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Moalfas in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    If you’re a Muslim, and you’ve never dated someone, then they’re not your “ex”. If you’re saying that about a Muslim sister, then you’re harming her dignity whether you mean it or not.
    Also, it is rude to not answer back to them if they simply want to say sallam and ask about you as their **brother**. 
    This is Islamic opinion by the way, think about the way the Prophets treated women and do not compare it to “western societies where they don’t talk and ignore their ‘exes’”.
    May Allah guide us all. 
  9. Partially Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to ali_fatheroforphans in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    Does Islam really say that? There is a lot of emphasis on not cutting ties with families etc. But no one is obliged to still maintain contact with a non-mahram, esspecially if both had feelings for each other in the past. The person has the right to choose and forget about the other person. It's not for us to judge someone's individual circumstances and what triggers their memories. I'm definitely not calling for them to be rude or just ignoring salams (it depends on the individual). But we have to respect other people and give them the space they need.
    What is the purpose of this minimum contact? If two people feel they have no future, wouldn't they want to move on? 
    No, actually someone who is selfish will check up on you despite knowing how hurt you are. It's a sacrifice that has to be made and if someone really cared for you they would be careful to not trigger your feelings again. I've observed a lot of people who break other people's heart still maintain contact and make it worse for the other person. Islam tells us to forgive each other and not have hatred. But that's where it ends. If I broke a girl's heart, I would own it up and never talk to her (because I would want her to move on).
  10. Completely Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to 3wliya_maryam in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    You're talking about the Western view on cutting off someone they once had feelings for, but what about the Islamic view? Are you that delusional ?
    When someone enters your life, whether they're your ex or just simply your friend, islamically you're not meant to cut ties and never speak to them. No one's telling you to continue talking to that person the way you used to, but keeping it to a minimum is required.
    You're wierd. Whose 'everyone'? If your 'EX' checks up on you, it means they still care for you, yes they have moved on but as long as you have been apart of their life they will still feel the need to ask how you're feeling every now and then. Its neither haram or 'wierd' 
    How do you think divorced parents do co parenting then? Is that also wierd? Besides thats an Islamic requirement aswell.
  11. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from 3wliya_maryam in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    If you’re a Muslim, and you’ve never dated someone, then they’re not your “ex”. If you’re saying that about a Muslim sister, then you’re harming her dignity whether you mean it or not.
    Also, it is rude to not answer back to them if they simply want to say sallam and ask about you as their **brother**. 
    This is Islamic opinion by the way, think about the way the Prophets treated women and do not compare it to “western societies where they don’t talk and ignore their ‘exes’”.
    May Allah guide us all. 
  12. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from ali_fatheroforphans in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    If you’re a Muslim, and you’ve never dated someone, then they’re not your “ex”. If you’re saying that about a Muslim sister, then you’re harming her dignity whether you mean it or not.
    Also, it is rude to not answer back to them if they simply want to say sallam and ask about you as their **brother**. 
    This is Islamic opinion by the way, think about the way the Prophets treated women and do not compare it to “western societies where they don’t talk and ignore their ‘exes’”.
    May Allah guide us all. 
  13. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Kaya in Talking to an ex (Islamic opinion)?   
    If you’re a Muslim, and you’ve never dated someone, then they’re not your “ex”. If you’re saying that about a Muslim sister, then you’re harming her dignity whether you mean it or not.
    Also, it is rude to not answer back to them if they simply want to say sallam and ask about you as their **brother**. 
    This is Islamic opinion by the way, think about the way the Prophets treated women and do not compare it to “western societies where they don’t talk and ignore their ‘exes’”.
    May Allah guide us all. 
  14. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from RUKS in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    #Truth
  15. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Hameedeh in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    #Truth
  16. Haha
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Hameedeh in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    I died at this! Literally everyone relates!
  17. Haha
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Hameedeh in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    ^ Answer it.
  18. Like
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from Moalfas in :(   
    you called out,
    deserted on the sands of Karbala,
    with the shameless swords of the traitors glinting with malice before you,
    you called out,
    Is there anyone to help me?
    That day the answer for you was silence.
    That day your companions could not jump to your side.
    That day Abbas could not respond with his sword held high.
    That day they lay still on the plains of Karbala
    with the East wind blowing dust over their bodies
    and you looked out into the face of evil,
    the Prophet betrayed, and you alone.
    I wish I could say today your call has been answered.
    I wish I could say today the millions of us are there with you in the plains of Karbala,
    that we call out with a resounding answer that echoes over the world,
    trembles mountain ranges and weakens the knees of any oppressor,
    shatters the pillars of any tyrant
    strikes hope in to eyes of the oppressed,
    and lightens the world with our love for you,
    an answer that holds the ferocity of Abbas as he thundered towards Furat,
    and answer that has the daring fury of Zaynab as she slammed Yazid in his court
    an answer that has the urgent and basic love that moved Ali Asghar to fall off his craddle.
    an answer that mimics the fierce loyalty of the shuhada that lay
    in the battlefield that day and you were alone.
    You were alone.
    But not again, I wish to say. It would not happen again.
    The streets shrouded in black,
    the handkerchiefs weighty with tears,
    the hearts that cry out for you
    the compassion, the pain,
    the sorrow that wrings out from every bosom-
    all an ardent reply to your call,
    that we are here, that we care.
    I long to say that this time your army will not be seventy-two.
    This time masses of millions will march along you.
    The glint of our combined swords will light the world.
    The proof of our loyalty the tears that we have wept
    and these black shrouds on our backs.
    This time around, you will not be alone Imam,
    We have answered your call, I hunger to say.
    But today I still hear your call.
    It echoes from the orphans of Iraq,
    It comes resoundingly from the tyrannized in Palestine,
    from the helpless in Africa,
    the terrorized in Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, India
    From every land, in every language your call,
    Is there anyone to help me
    stalks and haunts the world.
    It goes unheard, ignored, abused,
    but so defiantly loud in the pale eyes of the child who whimpers at the gun pointed at him.
    Does your despair not simmer in the eyes of thr child
    who's only view of the world is from behind barbed wires?
    Can I not hear the choking sobs of Umm Rabab
    When a mother buries her child in Gaza under the rain of bombs?
    Can I not hear the weeping of Sukayna on the headless body of her father
    when a girl screams as her father blows up into smithereens?
    Can I not hear the wails of Al Atash, Al Atash
    coming from the refugee tents set up in my country?
    Can I not hear the screams in the desert night when the tents burnt to ashes
    coming from the family that watches, terrified as their neighborhood is bulldozed by army
    tanks.
    In the desperate eyes of each and every single one of them,
    I can hear them echoing your call,
    your call to me
    Is there anyone to help me?
    Are they abandoned like you on the battlefield?
    The graves of today’s martyrs are fresh, moist with blood,
    their Yazids still stand, spitting out lies to the world.
    How could I say every day is not Ashura?
    How could I say every land is not Karbala?
    I wish to so much to say to you
    to somehow be able to meet your eyes and tell you that we are not like the cowardly backstabbing Kufans
    that we are not like the stone hearted Yazidis
    that we are answering your call,
    that we are there to help you
    but today, when I look out into the world
    and the clamour of oppression deafens me
    I tremble to say I still hear a silence.
    I hear a silence that echoes the hush of the desert on the day of Ashura,
    a silence which is a blessing for a Yazid
    a silence that stifles any hope,
    a silence that brings the end so much closer,
    a silence that is oppression
    the silence you were met with.
    It is that silence that I hear still today…
  19. Completely Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to The Green Knight in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    This
    And this
  20. My Prayers
    Ruqaya101 got a reaction from AmirioTheMuzzy in Refugee commits Suicide   
    ⬜️Manus refugee suicides in Brisbane, offshore detention claims another victim
    A 32-year-old mentally-distressed Afghan refugee, Sayed Mirwais Rohani, has committed suicide in Brisbane. The Afghan doctor jumped to his death from the 22nd floor of a Brisbane hotel on Tuesday, 15 October.
    Mirwais is the eighth Manus refugee death.
    Mirwais was brought to Australia from Manus Island in 2017, as his mental health badly deteriorated following his detention on Manus Island in September 2013. He had been living in community detention in Brisbane for the last year.
    The tragedy is shocking tale of deliberate abuse and neglect.
    Mirwais had a medical degree from a Chinese university which is recognised by Australia. He completed his degree in English and spoke six languages. He offered to work in the Lorengau hospital for free and was moved out of the Lombrum detention centre on that basis. Despite being moved he was not allowed to work in the hospital.
    As his mental health declined he was attacked, beaten and imprisoned.
    His father, a refugee living in Britain, travelled to Manus Island in 2016 in an effort to have him released so Mirwais could join his parents in Britain. Peter Dutton refused the request on the basis that Mirwais was over 18.
    There was a second attempt to try to get Mirwais to join his family in Britain after he was moved to Australia. That attempt also stalled with Peter Dutton and the Department of Home Affairs. His father visited Mirwais again in 2018.
    “Manus Island, offshore detention and Peter Dutton are responsible for yet another refugee death,” said Ian Rintoul, spokesperson for the Refugee Action Coalition, “In 2010, Australian of the Year, Patrick McGorry, labelled detention centres ‘factories of mental illness’. Mirwais death is yet more evidence of the damage that offshore detention is doing. It’s time offshore detention was ended.”
    Link to Refugee Action Coalition statement 
    ◽️ refugeeaction.org.au/?p=8057
     
    Honestly, this is so sad. My close family friends were in the same position with 2 little boys and they suffered a lot of neglect until alhamdulilah, Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) answered their prayers, but others are still left in there, people with so much potential that are being abused, neglected and mentally drained. 
    May Allah (سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى) help them all. 
  21. Completely Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to notme in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    I was expecting wise, intelligent, and knowledgeable people. 
  22. Haha
    Ruqaya101 reacted to Totoro in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    Finally, somewhere people talk about the religion as if it matters. 
  23. Like
    Ruqaya101 reacted to hasanhh in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    l have wondered if that constant blinking is interferring with the site. ShiaChat is the only place where l can have multi-minute delays before the next page comes up.
  24. Completely Agree
    Ruqaya101 reacted to AStruggler in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    I hate this giant shiamatch ad, hopefully no one can screenwatch my device  
    (not sure if this was actually my first thought, but it def must've been one of the first)
  25. Haha
    Ruqaya101 reacted to hasanhh in What was your first thought when you joined ShiaChat?   
    Doesn't matter, the gov't has had a file since this past March.
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