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In the Name of God بسم الله

Ali

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  1. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Mariétou Ndiaye in [FAQ] Shiachat.com - The Site   
    Welcome Fellow Truth Seeker!
    Whether you’re here because someone directed you to this site or you’ve stumbled upon us by chance, take a few minutes to look around. We guarantee that you’ll like what you find.
    Here at ShiaChat.com, we have one unifying goal: to seek out the Truth. It doesn’t matter what faith you do (or don’t) adhere to, what race you belong to, how many years you have tucked under your belt or what your philosophy in life is. As long as you’re eager to exchange thoughts, explore new concepts or gain a better understanding of Islam, you’ll be right at home on this board.
    ShiaChat.com welcomes individuals from all walks of life and and there exists a diverse mix of cultures and ideologies amongst our members. Consequently, we have over 25 forums spanning a wide variety of subjects ranging from the social aspects of an Islamic community to philosophical inter-faith debates.
    You can discuss politics, history, current affairs, business, sports, women’s issues, health – and even find solutions to everyday problems at our Community Helpdesk! Whatever you enjoy talking about, you won’t be hard-pressed to find a niche to fit into here.
    If the speed of real-time conversation is what you crave, then our 24-hour Live Chatroom is just the place for you. Pop in, introduce yourself, ask your questions, air your opinions, meet new friends and watch the clock...it’s very easy to get carried away when you’re intellectually stimulated.
    Islam is currently the fastest growing religion in the world, but unfortunately many non-Muslims don’t understand why. Drop into our Reverts forum to witness from a first-person perspective why so many are entering the fold of Islam and choosing the Ja’fari School of Thought*. You’ll probably be pleasantly surprised, and perhaps even inspired by what there is to find.
    We have over 50,000 active registered users as of 2016 and plenty of people are dropping in to see what all the fuss is about, with more than 50,000 hits a day. We agree that it might be hard to keep up with the thousands of new posts that go up every week, but because the board is so easy to navigate, you should have no trouble selecting the ones you do want to track.
    At ShiaChat.com we believe in sharing the wonderful secrets to success that Islam has to offer humanity, and we know that this can only happen when people have an open forum to air their opinions and learn from one another. We look forward to hearing your voice in our midst.
    Enter in peace.
    The Ja’fari School of Thought is one followed by the Shia Ithna Asheri (literally meaning Followers of the Twelve). One of the two major sects in Islam, the Shia believe in the 12 Imams who were Divinely appointed to succeed the Prophet Muhammad (s) and protect the Final Message of God - Islam.
  2. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Nevsevug in Fassad Book   
    Salams,
     
    This thread has gotten me out of hiding.
     
    This is a very simplistic view of the Internet (and the world in general) if you think Facebook is the (only) devil in disguise.  Although he majority have mentioned these points, lets reiterate.
     
    Only people who have Facebook and using this feature to login to ShiaChat will be "associated" and "tracked" by Facebook.  Regular members with regular logins will not.  This is a single sided trust, not both ways.  Facebook is trusting ShiaChat, ShiaChat is not trusting Facebook.
     
    Having said that, it is very gullible to think that if you stay off of social media sites such as Facebook you're safe from the "evil eyes" of the government.  In fact, everything from your laptop hardware, to Operating system, to browser, to your  router, to your ISP, to the Internet backbone to the datacenter shiachat is hosted on to the servers, to the OS of these servers, down to the application that Shiachat runs (this forum software) could possibly have access points to "big brother".  Lets take it a step further, as I've mentioned before and I will continue to mention.  I have and will continue to provide information to authorities if and when requested; this is clearly stated in our user policy and it is to protect this website and its members from our common enemies.  This is the world we live in and unless you decide to disconnect all together, you're being watched and should be accountable on what you do online.
     
    There is a cool Iraqi old school song..  Yumma nitalni il ouuti, soochi li3abit ibwaiyara..  Avoid the wire an you wont get the natla ;)
  3. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Sayyida Fatima Al Zahra (as) [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    Name: Fatima
    Title: Al Zahra
    Born: Friday 20th of Jamadi-ul-Akhar in Mecca
    Father's Name: Holy Prophet Muhammad Ibn-e-Abdulla صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم
    Mother's Name: Khadija bint-e-Khuwailid
    Died: 13th Jamadi-ul-Awwal at Medina at the age of 18 years (due to injury inflicted upon her through force of a falling door).
    Buried: The cemetery of Jannatul Baqi at Medina
  4. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Ejaz in The Study Quran - This will revolutionize the study of the Quran!   
    This is nothing compared to the intro where Nasr specifically mentions that Prophet Mohammed left behind the Quran and Ahlulbayt and explains the meaning of when Iman Ali (as) says he is the dot of the letter "b" in Bismillah. 
  5. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Ejaz in The Study Quran - This will revolutionize the study of the Quran!   
    Salams All,
     
    I don't usually like to open specific topics just to promote specific books, but this.. this is an incredible, magnificent work of art that is truly worthy of every library especially for non-Muslims seeking to understand the true meaning of the Quran and not the understanding of today's extremists and terrorists. 
    This book has made ripples across academia and will surely be the new source for understanding the Quran.  It will finally separate the correct understanding and tafseer of the Quran of the Shi'a point of view from the extremist Wahhabi point of view.  The introduction alone dispels many of the most misunderstood ideas about the Quran as a result of Wahabi thought and goes above and beyond in promoting the Ithna Ashari tafseer of the Quran.
    Br. Nasr who does not require an introduction has teamed up with the best in academia in the past 10 years to come up with this work which is published by the same folks who did the Bible study decades ago that became the official source for Bible commentary.  The book brings together multiple sources of tafseer for individual ayahs and provides a commentary on the most prominent and accepted versions. Luckily, a majority of the tafseer highlights the Shi'a school of thought view.
    I believe it is our duty as Shia's to spread the word on this marvelous effort.
    Here's a little report on it:   http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/25/living/study-quran-extremism/
    Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Study-Quran-New-Translation-Commentary/dp/0061125865/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1448678295&sr=8-1&keywords=study+quran
     
    Reviews: 
    “The Study Quran could not be more timely. This painstaking work will do much to enlighten and inform the reading strategies of all who seek to understand the Holy Writ of Islam, especially as it relates to the beliefs and practices of Muslims.” (Sherman A. Jackson, King Faisal Chair of Islamic Thought and Practice, The University of Southern California)

    “A huge and significant scholarly undertaking, a major service to Islamic studies. This work solves the perennial problem of how to introduce students to the Quranic text, offering what is perhaps the closest one can get to an ecumenical exegesis of the Quran.” (Jonathan Brown, Associate Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim Christian Understanding at Georgetown University)

    “Even the non-Arabist will gain an impression of the way specific verses have been understood. By giving attention to a wide range of commentators the editors capture the diversity and depth of the exegetical ideas that have been brought to the Quran-- a useful resource.” (Peter Adamson, Professor of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich and at King's College London)

    “A truly magisterial and the most comprehensive study of the Quran to date. Highly recommended as an unparalleled reference work for engaging the Quran in its many different aspects.” (Asma Afsaruddin, Chair of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at Indiana University Bloomington)

    “A monument of religious literature in its own right, The Study Quran presents the sacred text in a meticulous new English rendering. One of this ambitious project’s greatest strengths is the breadth and variety of exegetical sources and methods that inform the commentary throughout --most impressive.” (John Renard, Professor of Medieval Islam at Saint Louis University)

    “Nasr and his team have done the English-speaking world an enormous favor with their erudite and profound translation and commentary on the Qur’an combined with essays by some of the most learned scholars on the Qur’an-a timely contribution in a world that has become infected by Islamophobia and intolerance.” (Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl, UCLA School of Law, and author of The Great Theft)

    “A stupendous achievement. An indispensable handbook. The Study Quran contains everything readers will need. The translation is lucid and eloquent; the extensive commentaries offer continuous insight; the various essays cover virtually every aspect of the Quran. I cannot praise their collective work enough!” (Eric Ormsby, Formerly Professor of Islamic Philosophy and Theology at McGill University's Institute of Islamic Studies)

    “A major milestone for the study of the Qur’an. Elegantly written, the project is ambitious yet amply fulfills its promise. Invaluable for anyone interested in understanding the Qur’an and essential reading for students of the Qur’an at all levels.” (Dr. Michael Sells, Barrows Professor of the History and Literature of Islam, University of Chicago)

    “This scholarly yet accessible work speaks directly to the tensions and misunderstandings of our gravely polarized world. It should be on the shelves of libraries and universities throughout the English-speaking world.” (Karen Armstrong, author of Fields of Blood)

    “The contributors guide the reader through the intricacies of the sacred text in a way that lays bare the superficiality, selectivity and inaccuracy of some modern interpretations of the Quran at a time when this is sorely needed.” (Karen Armstrong, author of Fields of Blood)

    “This impressive tome-the fruit of a patient collective venture-offers an extraordinary panoptic survey of the history of tafsir: some forty traditional commentaries-ancient and modern, Sunni and Shi’i-have been summoned here… Special mention is due to the translators of the Qur’an for their often remarkable achievement.” (Dr. Michel Chodkiewicz, author of Seal of the Saints and An Ocean Without Shore)

    “A stunningly successful collaboration of scholars who have produced a modern masterpiece of clarity and eloquence. Never before in one place has so much Qur’anic scholarship been made accessible to the intelligent general reader.” (Ingrid Mattson, London and Windsor Community Chair in Islamic Studies at Huron University College, University of Western Ontario)

    “An extraordinary scholarly achievement, The Study Quran brings the text to life, gently guiding readers into the exciting interpretive worlds of Muslims in all of their rich diversity.” (Zareena A Grewal, PhD, professor of Religious Studies at Yale University)

    “The Study Quran is a well-guided tour. The work of the editors is uniformly meticulous, comprehensive, and erudite. Whether the reader is a novice to the Quranic text, longtime student, or scholar, they will find much to reflect upon in this extraordinarily valuable resource.” (Kristin Zahra Sands, Harlequin Adair Dammann Chair in Islamic Studies, Sarah Lawrence College)

    “The Study Quran represents a breakthrough for bringing the message of the Quran to the English-speaking world. The translation itself is beautiful, but the commentary truly makes this an indispensable resource for anyone -- whether Muslim or non-Muslim -- who wishes to appreciate the Quran’s message.” (Mohammad Fadel, Associate Professor of Law, University of Toronto Faculty of Law)

    “The Study Quran is a fascinating and pioneering academic achievement. With analytical depth and clarity, it offers to both specialist and general readers, Muslim and non-Muslim, uniquely learned insights into the reception and interpretation of Islam’s sacred scripture within the various Muslim intellectual and spiritual traditions.” (Sebastian Günther, Professor and Chair of Arabic and Islamic Studies, University of Göttingen, Germany)

    “This new English translation conveys the music and meaning of the Arabic. That it is accompanied by a learned commentary distilled from the highly varied classical, modern and contemporary exegetical traditions provides unparalleled access to a uniquely influential yet understudied scripture sacred to one out of four human beings.” (Todd Lawson, Professor of Islamic Thought, University of Toronto)

    “A magnificent scholarly achievement, The Study Quran offers an eminently readable, thought-provoking and nuanced understanding of Islam’s sacred text that will help both Muslims and non-Muslims appreciate the richness and diversity of understandings of the Quran throughout the ages.” (Shafique N. Virani, Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto)

    “The monumental The Study Quran is a truly indispensable reference. As with every sacred scripture, the meanings of the Quran are mediated by a range of interpretive traditions which have long been accessible only to Muslim scholars. Now a team of editors have provided an impressively accessible synthesis.” (James W. Morris, Dept. of Theology and Islamic Civilization and Societies Program, Boston College)

    “An invaluable resource that the general reader and students of Islamic disciplines will benefit from. The wealth of detailed information it contains makes The Study Quran a valuable text in understanding the centrality of the Quran and its role in shaping the spiritual and mundane lives of Muslims.” (Liyakat Takim, Sharjah Chair in Global Islam, McMaster University)

    “The publication of The Study Quran is a joyous occasion for all scripture lovers: a new English translation that celebrates the dignity and formality of sacred discourse, running commentary, and, as a very special signature, compelling and deeply instructive essays by fifteen of today’s leading scholars on Islam.” (Peter Ochs, Bronfman Professor of Modern Judaic Studies, University of Virginia)

    “A monumental milestone in the study of the Quran in western academia and a veritable touchstone of authenticity for all who are asking: what does the Quran actually say? With clarity and comprehensiveness, the editors and translators of this magnificent volume have helped distinguish the true spirit of Islamic faith.” (Reza Shah-Kazemi, The Institute of Ismaili Studies)

    “The Study Quran is a treasure trove of insights and information. There is nothing quite like it in English: a single volume comprising an accessible translation, a survey of classical commentaries, essays by prominent scholars, informative appendices, and multiple maps. Indeed a massive, unprecedented undertaking.” (Mohammad Hassan Khalil, Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Director of the Muslim Studies Program, Michigan State University)

    “The Study Quran is a unique work. It provides a clear, readable translation of the Quran and detailed explanations of Quranic ideas and concepts. Its accessibility is likely to gain a large readership. An indispensable Quranic studies resource for scholar and student.” (Mustansir Mir, Youngstown State University)

    “A work of extraordinary significance, The Study Quran makes accessible in English Islam’s sacred scripture along with an array of material necessary to appreciate the nuances of the text. An invaluable and much needed resource for understanding the Quran. A monumental accomplishment.” (Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures and Director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University)

    “Never before has the depth of Quranic exegesis been available in a single volume. We can think of few tasks more urgent in the global climate than discovering the universal character of this misunderstood text. We owe the editors our profound gratitude.” (Dr. Waleed El-Ansary, University Chair of Islamic Studies at Xavier University)

    “Seyyed Hossein Nasr has assembled a magnificent team of younger scholars, not only competent in Quranic studies but suffused with Muslim faith as well, to open its reaches in the world today. A prodigious effort of scholarship in the service of faith. ” (David Burrell, Theodore Hesburgh C.S.C. Professor Emeritus in Philosophy and Theology, University of Notre Dame)

    “The Study Quran will remain for many decades to come the key reference work in English for students of Islamic Studies and scholars of religion alike, as well as ordinary readers interested in the spiritual content, historical context and literary monument of the revelation of Islam.” (Dr. Leonard Lewisohn, Senior Lecturer in Persian, University of Exeter, U.K.)

    “The Study Quran is a milestone in Islamic studies. It will become the standard reference for anyone interested in traditional Muslim interpretation of the Quran.” (Carl W. Ernst, William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

    “This is perhaps the most important work done on the Islamic faith in the English language to date. We owe a great debt to Dr. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, one of the intellectual giants of our time, and his team for bringing this labor of love to fruition.” (Hamza Yusuf, Co-Founder of Zaytuna College)

    “The Study Quran will be an essential book for every English speaking student of Islam and every Muslim (and every Sufi) for generations to come. It answers every question about the meaning of Quranic verses that the vast majority of readers of the Quran will have.” (Dr. Alan Godlas, Associate Professor , Department of Religion, University of Georgia)

    “An important event in the history of Quranic studies. It will make available the Quranic text along with a clearly written commentary, thus it’s much more important than another translation. An extremely useful work, particularly since it will allow readers who are not Arabists to engage easily with the Quran.” (Devin Stewart, Associate Professor at Emory University)
    About the Author
    Seyyed Hossein Nasr is university professor of Islamic Studies at George Washington University. Author of over fifty books, Professor Nasr is a well-known and highly respected intellectual figure both in the West and in the Islamic world. Born in Tehran, raised from the age of twelve in the United States, and a graduate of MIT and Harvard University, Nasr is well qualified to explain Islam to a Western audience. He appears frequently on Meet the Press, as well as other national news shows.
  6. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in #8 Imam Ridha (as) [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    Name - Ali
    Title - Ar-Ridha
    Kunyat - Abul Hasan
    Born - Thursday 11th of Zilqad 148 A.H. , at Medina
    Father's Name - Moosa ibn Ja'far
    Mother's Name - Ummul Baneen Najma
    Died - At the age of 55 years, at Mashad in Khorasan, on Tuesday, 17th Safar 203 AH. Poisoned by Mamoon the Abbaside Caliph
    Buried - in Mashad, Iran .
  7. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Muslim2010 in #4 Imam Sajjad (as) [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    Name - Ali-ibn-ul Husain
    Title - Zain-ul Abideen
    Kunyat - Abu Muhammad
    Born - Saturday 15th of Jamadi-ul-Awwal (some mention 5th Sha'ban), at Medina
    Father's Name - Husain ibn Ali
    Mother's Name - Shahr Banoo, daughter of King Yazdigard II
    Died - at the age of 58 years, in Medina , on the 21st of Muharram 95 AH. Poisoned by Waleed bin Abdul Malik Marwan.
    Buried - Jannat-ul-Baqi .
  8. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Husayni in Prophet Mohammed (صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم) [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    Name - Muhammad
    Title - Al-Mustafa, Al-Amin, Ar-Rasool
    Kunyat - Abul Qasim
    Born - Friday, the 17th of Rabi-ul Awwal
    Father's Name - Abdullah Ibn Abdul Muttalib
    Mother's Name - Amina bint-e-Wahab
    Died - at the age of 63 years on Monday, 28th Safar 11 AH
    Buried - in his house adjoining the mosque at Medina
  9. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Fakeha in #8 Imam Ridha (as) [OFFICIAL THREAD]   
    Name - Ali
    Title - Ar-Ridha
    Kunyat - Abul Hasan
    Born - Thursday 11th of Zilqad 148 A.H. , at Medina
    Father's Name - Moosa ibn Ja'far
    Mother's Name - Ummul Baneen Najma
    Died - At the age of 55 years, at Mashad in Khorasan, on Tuesday, 17th Safar 203 AH. Poisoned by Mamoon the Abbaside Caliph
    Buried - in Mashad, Iran .
  10. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Anonymous in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  11. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Anonymous in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams All,
    I'm not ignoring this, just extremely busy, especially this month. I will look into it late June/Early July inshallah.  I think the pressure is on and the users have spoken  
  12. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from notme in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams All,
    I'm not ignoring this, just extremely busy, especially this month. I will look into it late June/Early July inshallah.  I think the pressure is on and the users have spoken  
  13. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from notme in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  14. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Dreamcatcher in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  15. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Hameedeh in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  16. Completely Agree
    Ali got a reaction from Khadim uz Zahra in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  17. Completely Agree
    Ali got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams,
    Ok Done!  That was much quicker than I expected.  Please report any issues directly to me.  Please update your bookmarks to https://www.shiachat.com

  18. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Hameedeh in Why is the site not Secured/SSL?   
    Salams All,
    I'm not ignoring this, just extremely busy, especially this month. I will look into it late June/Early July inshallah.  I think the pressure is on and the users have spoken  
  19. Like
    Ali got a reaction from حسين in Learn how to pray!   
    It is impossible to explain how to pray in short article like this and it is a big responsibility to teach people something this important. However, the greater responsibility is to introduce the basic and leave the research for the reader. Before praying you have to make a wodho, be sure you are pure and clean, and your dress is appropriate(research more about this part). Ladies should wear a clothe where only their face, hands (to the wrist, not arms) and their feet (to their ankle) is shown, and male are required to cover their body appropriately as well.
    Neiat and Ghera'at
    Neiat or intention is the most important part of the prayer. By this you say that why you are standing for prayer, which prayer, how many rakats. You can say it loud or in your mind.
    For example: I will pray the salat al-Fajr, two ra'akat, gurbatan ela-laah, (to get closer to Allah).
    It doesn't matter what language you say it, as long as you have the intention. This is the way you should stand and put your hands during this stage:
    (fig 1)

    Then you do your Takbiratul-Ehram (saying Allah Akbar)and drop your hands, from ears to your laps. Now you entered prayer officially and from this point till salam you can't talk, eat, or move out of prayer's form. Start your prayer by reading Al-Hamd and the sura (fig 2). You have to say everything in Arabic and learning it is very easy just need practice, you can ask some of the Muslims or people who know Arabic to read the right pronunciation for you. In this part you would read two chapters, Reading the chapter al-Hamd is necessary but choosing the sura is up to you, people read the chapter of Ekhlas mostly. The way to stand and read is in the figure 2.
    (fig 2)

    Rakat
    Rakat consist of Gera'at (reading of the al-hamd and sura, or Tasbeehat al-Arba'a), one Ruku'e, and two Sajda.
    Ruku'e
    After you read the Al-hamd and sura you bend by placing your hands on your knees and looking between your legs, this is called Ruku'e. And you say a Thekr (praise to Allah). To make it easy on the beginners you would say Subhan-Allah 3 times or you can refer to the people who pray for their thekr. Fig 3 explains how you have to do this part.
    (fig 3)

    Qunut
    Qunut is the part you raise your hand and ask Allah for what you need you can say it in any language or just say a short grace in Arabic. Qunut is performed after the Al-hamd and Sura recitation of the second rakat and it is not required (wajeb) but is Mustahab (recommended). The way to do this part is explained in figure 4.
    (fig 4)

    Sajda
    After Ruku'e you stand straight like you started and then go to Sajda. In this part you prostrate to Allah. That means you place seven part of your body touching the ground and say a thekr similar to the one in Ruku'e, your forehead, palms, knees, and your toes. Your forhead should be on a wooden or stone made object (see more details on this part). You did one Sajda, like in fig 5, you sit like your in Tashahood, and do another one after that. 
    (fig 5)

    Tashahud
    After performing your second sajda on the second rakat of every prayer and the last rakat of the particular prayer your performing, you perform Tashahud. In this part you would sit in a way that your left foot is on your right [it is more mustahab to place the upper part of the right foot on the sole of the left foot] and your palms are on your thighs. And you read Tashahud in Arabic (see fig 6). This part is to be performed on every two Rakats and before you finish salat. Example if you are doing the Dohr, Asr, and Esha prayers which are four Rakats you do Tashahood in the end of second Rakat and at the end of fourth Rakat before saying the Salam. And if you praying the Maghreb prayer which is three Rakat's you do Tashahood at the end of second Rakat and the third Rakat before finishing the prayer. The meaning of it is:
    I bear witness that there is no god but Allah, He is one and no one is like him, And I bear witness that Mohammad is his conformer (Ab'd) and his messenger, O'Allah send greetings to Mohammad and the Family of Mohammad.
    (fig 6)

    Salam
    This is the end part of salat and by reciting this part you officially end your prayer. You would read it at the end of the last Rakat (after the second sajda) and you finish your prayer. After reading it you would raise your palms from your thigh and say Allah'u Akbar and put your hands back on the thighs for three times (see fig 7). You read it in Arabic and pronunciation is Here. The meaning of the reading it is
    Greetings to us and to the faithful (Saleheen) conformers' of Allah, Greetings and Mercy of Allah be onto you.
    (fig 7)

    Tasbeehat' al-Arba'a
    This part is for prayers other than Fajr prayer which have more than 2 Rakats and it replaces the reading of Al-hamd and the Sura. You can say this thekr (prefered) or you can simply read the Al-hamd chapter only with low voice. This is the pronunciation of the thekr:
    Subhanal'lah, Wal-hamdule'lah,
    Wala Elaha Elallah'u, Wa'llah'u Akbar.
    Which means clean and pure is Allah, and thanks to Allah, and no god but Allah, and Allah is great. There is four parts to it and that is why it is called Tasbeehat al-Arba'a. You can say this thekr only once or three times.
    [Mod Note: To add clarification that in Tashahud  it is more mustahab to place the upper part of the right foot on the sole of the left foot.]
    Source: Right steps to form namaz (salah, salat, prayer)
  20. Thanks
    Ali got a reaction from Geetha Das in Learn how to pray!   
    It is impossible to explain how to pray in short article like this and it is a big responsibility to teach people something this important. However, the greater responsibility is to introduce the basic and leave the research for the reader. Before praying you have to make a wodho, be sure you are pure and clean, and your dress is appropriate(research more about this part). Ladies should wear a clothe where only their face, hands (to the wrist, not arms) and their feet (to their ankle) is shown, and male are required to cover their body appropriately as well.
    Neiat and Ghera'at
    Neiat or intention is the most important part of the prayer. By this you say that why you are standing for prayer, which prayer, how many rakats. You can say it loud or in your mind.
    For example: I will pray the salat al-Fajr, two ra'akat, gurbatan ela-laah, (to get closer to Allah).
    It doesn't matter what language you say it, as long as you have the intention. This is the way you should stand and put your hands during this stage:
    (fig 1)

    Then you do your Takbiratul-Ehram (saying Allah Akbar)and drop your hands, from ears to your laps. Now you entered prayer officially and from this point till salam you can't talk, eat, or move out of prayer's form. Start your prayer by reading Al-Hamd and the sura (fig 2). You have to say everything in Arabic and learning it is very easy just need practice, you can ask some of the Muslims or people who know Arabic to read the right pronunciation for you. In this part you would read two chapters, Reading the chapter al-Hamd is necessary but choosing the sura is up to you, people read the chapter of Ekhlas mostly. The way to stand and read is in the figure 2.
    (fig 2)

    Rakat
    Rakat consist of Gera'at (reading of the al-hamd and sura, or Tasbeehat al-Arba'a), one Ruku'e, and two Sajda.
    Ruku'e
    After you read the Al-hamd and sura you bend by placing your hands on your knees and looking between your legs, this is called Ruku'e. And you say a Thekr (praise to Allah). To make it easy on the beginners you would say Subhan-Allah 3 times or you can refer to the people who pray for their thekr. Fig 3 explains how you have to do this part.
    (fig 3)

    Qunut
    Qunut is the part you raise your hand and ask Allah for what you need you can say it in any language or just say a short grace in Arabic. Qunut is performed after the Al-hamd and Sura recitation of the second rakat and it is not required (wajeb) but is Mustahab (recommended). The way to do this part is explained in figure 4.
    (fig 4)

    Sajda
    After Ruku'e you stand straight like you started and then go to Sajda. In this part you prostrate to Allah. That means you place seven part of your body touching the ground and say a thekr similar to the one in Ruku'e, your forehead, palms, knees, and your toes. Your forhead should be on a wooden or stone made object (see more details on this part). You did one Sajda, like in fig 5, you sit like your in Tashahood, and do another one after that. 
    (fig 5)

    Tashahud
    After performing your second sajda on the second rakat of every prayer and the last rakat of the particular prayer your performing, you perform Tashahud. In this part you would sit in a way that your left foot is on your right [it is more mustahab to place the upper part of the right foot on the sole of the left foot] and your palms are on your thighs. And you read Tashahud in Arabic (see fig 6). This part is to be performed on every two Rakats and before you finish salat. Example if you are doing the Dohr, Asr, and Esha prayers which are four Rakats you do Tashahood in the end of second Rakat and at the end of fourth Rakat before saying the Salam. And if you praying the Maghreb prayer which is three Rakat's you do Tashahood at the end of second Rakat and the third Rakat before finishing the prayer. The meaning of it is:
    I bear witness that there is no god but Allah, He is one and no one is like him, And I bear witness that Mohammad is his conformer (Ab'd) and his messenger, O'Allah send greetings to Mohammad and the Family of Mohammad.
    (fig 6)

    Salam
    This is the end part of salat and by reciting this part you officially end your prayer. You would read it at the end of the last Rakat (after the second sajda) and you finish your prayer. After reading it you would raise your palms from your thigh and say Allah'u Akbar and put your hands back on the thighs for three times (see fig 7). You read it in Arabic and pronunciation is Here. The meaning of the reading it is
    Greetings to us and to the faithful (Saleheen) conformers' of Allah, Greetings and Mercy of Allah be onto you.
    (fig 7)

    Tasbeehat' al-Arba'a
    This part is for prayers other than Fajr prayer which have more than 2 Rakats and it replaces the reading of Al-hamd and the Sura. You can say this thekr (prefered) or you can simply read the Al-hamd chapter only with low voice. This is the pronunciation of the thekr:
    Subhanal'lah, Wal-hamdule'lah,
    Wala Elaha Elallah'u, Wa'llah'u Akbar.
    Which means clean and pure is Allah, and thanks to Allah, and no god but Allah, and Allah is great. There is four parts to it and that is why it is called Tasbeehat al-Arba'a. You can say this thekr only once or three times.
    [Mod Note: To add clarification that in Tashahud  it is more mustahab to place the upper part of the right foot on the sole of the left foot.]
    Source: Right steps to form namaz (salah, salat, prayer)
  21. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Miss hasani in [FAQ] Shiachat.com - The Site   
    Mission Statement of ShiaChat.com
    The two major goals that we strive for are to first provide a website to allow all Muslims and Non-Muslims alike to interact and discuss religious issues; secondly, to promote the Shia Ithna-Asheri school of thought. We shall try to bridge the gaps between fellow Muslims, as well as uphold the teachings of Allah (st), Prophet Muhammad (saww), and the Ahlul-Bayt (as).
  22. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Miss hasani in [FAQ] Shiachat.com - The Site   
    Welcome Fellow Truth Seeker!
    Whether you’re here because someone directed you to this site or you’ve stumbled upon us by chance, take a few minutes to look around. We guarantee that you’ll like what you find.
    Here at ShiaChat.com, we have one unifying goal: to seek out the Truth. It doesn’t matter what faith you do (or don’t) adhere to, what race you belong to, how many years you have tucked under your belt or what your philosophy in life is. As long as you’re eager to exchange thoughts, explore new concepts or gain a better understanding of Islam, you’ll be right at home on this board.
    ShiaChat.com welcomes individuals from all walks of life and and there exists a diverse mix of cultures and ideologies amongst our members. Consequently, we have over 25 forums spanning a wide variety of subjects ranging from the social aspects of an Islamic community to philosophical inter-faith debates.
    You can discuss politics, history, current affairs, business, sports, women’s issues, health – and even find solutions to everyday problems at our Community Helpdesk! Whatever you enjoy talking about, you won’t be hard-pressed to find a niche to fit into here.
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    Islam is currently the fastest growing religion in the world, but unfortunately many non-Muslims don’t understand why. Drop into our Reverts forum to witness from a first-person perspective why so many are entering the fold of Islam and choosing the Ja’fari School of Thought*. You’ll probably be pleasantly surprised, and perhaps even inspired by what there is to find.
    We have over 50,000 active registered users as of 2016 and plenty of people are dropping in to see what all the fuss is about, with more than 50,000 hits a day. We agree that it might be hard to keep up with the thousands of new posts that go up every week, but because the board is so easy to navigate, you should have no trouble selecting the ones you do want to track.
    At ShiaChat.com we believe in sharing the wonderful secrets to success that Islam has to offer humanity, and we know that this can only happen when people have an open forum to air their opinions and learn from one another. We look forward to hearing your voice in our midst.
    Enter in peace.
    The Ja’fari School of Thought is one followed by the Shia Ithna Asheri (literally meaning Followers of the Twelve). One of the two major sects in Islam, the Shia believe in the 12 Imams who were Divinely appointed to succeed the Prophet Muhammad (s) and protect the Final Message of God - Islam.
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    Ali got a reaction from shehzadi_fz in What is Ashura?   
    In the month of Muharram 61 AH (approx. 20 October 680 AD), an event took place in Iraq at a place known as Kerbala on the bank of the river Euphrates. It seemed in those days insignificant from the historical point of view. A large army which had been mobilised by the Umayyad regime besieged a group of persons numbering less than a hundred and put them under pressure to pay allegiance to the Caliph of the time and submit to his authority. The small group resisted and a severe battle took place in which they were all killed.

    It appeared at that time that like hundreds of similar events, this battle would be recorded in history and forgotten in time. However, the events that occurred on the 10th day of Muharram in Kerbala were to become a beacon and an inspiration for future generations. In this article, we shall examine briefly the principal adversaries.

    Who is Hussain?

    The leader of the small band of men who were martyred in Kerbala was none other than Husain (A), son of Ali bin Abi Talib (A) and grandson of the Holy Prophet (S). Who was Husain? He was the son of Fatima (A) for whom the Holy Prophet (S) said, "Husain is from me and I am from Husain. May God love whoever loves Husain." [1]

    With the passing away of his brother Hasan(A) in 50 AH, Husain (A) became the leader of the household of the Holy Prophet (S). He respected the agreement of peace signed by Hasan (A) and Muawiya, and, despite the urging of his followers, he did not undertake any activity that threatened the political status quo. Rather he continued with the responsibility of looking after the religious needs of the people and was recognised for his knowledge, piety and generosity. An example of the depth of his perception can be seen in his beautiful du'a on the day of Arafat, wherein he begins by explaining the qualities of Allah, saying:

    " (Oh Allah) How could an argument be given about Your Existence by a being whose total and complete existence is in need of you? When did you ever disappear so that you might need an evidence and logic to lead (the people) towards You? And when did You ever become away and distant so that your signs and effects made the people get in touch with you? Blind be the eye which does not see You (whereas) You are observing him. What did the one who missed You find? And what does the one who finds You lack? Certainly, the one who got pleased and inclined toward other than You, came to nothingness (failed)."

    On the other hand, we have Yazid, whose father (Muawiya) and grandfather (Abu Sufyan - the arch-enemy of the Prophet) had always tried to sabotage the mission of the Holy Prophet, and who showed his true colour by stating in a poem, "Bani Hashim had staged a play to obtain kingdom, there was neither any news from God nor any revelation." [2]

    Mas'udi writes that Yazid was a pleasure-seeking person, given to wine drinking and playing with pets. It is no wonder that Husain's response to Yazid's governor, when asked to pay allegiance to Yazid was, "We are the household of the prophethood, the source of messengership, the descending-place of the angels, through us Allah had began (showering His favours) and with us He has perfected (His favours), whereas Yazid is a sinful person, a drunkard, the killer of innocent people and one who openly indulges in sinful acts. A person like me can never pledge allegiance to a person like him ..." [3]

    The revolution of Husain (A) was an Islamic movement spearheaded by one of the great leaders of Islam. The principles and laws of Islam demanded that Husain (A) act to warn the Ummah of the evil situation which it was in, and to stand in the way of the deviating ruler. As Husain (A) himself remarked when he left Madina for the last time, "I am not rising (against Yazid) as an insolent or an arrogant person, or a mischief-monger or tyrant. I have risen (against Yazid) as I seek to reform the Ummah of my grandfather. I wish to bid the good and forbid the evil." [4]

    Hussain (A) was killed on the battlefield as he did Sajdah. His head was removed from his body on the plains of Kerbala, mounted on a spear, and paraded through villages and towns as it was taken to Damascus and presented at the feet of Yazid.

    Why remember Ashura?

    Why is Husain (A) regarded as the "leader of the martyrs" ? It is because he was not just the victim of an ambitious ruler. There is no doubt that the tragedy of Kerbala, when ascribed to the killers, is a criminal and terrible act. However when ascribed to Husain (A) himself, it represents a conscious confrontation and a courageous resistance for a sacred cause. The whole nation had failed to stand up to Yazid. They had succumbed to his will, and deviation and regression towards the pre-Islamic ways were increasing.

    Passiveness by Husain (A) in this situation would have meant the end of Islam as we know it. Thus Husain (A) took upon himself the responsibility of the whole nation. The greatest tragedy was that one who stood up for the noblest of causes, the defence of Islam, was cut down in so cruel a manner.

    It is for this reason that the sacrifice of Husain (A) is commemorated annually throughout the Muslim world. Our sorrow never abates as we relive the tragedy. As Allama Iqbal says in his Baqiyat (in Urdu):

    Ronay wala hoon Shaheed-e-Kerbala key gham men main,
    Kya durey maqsad na dengey Saqiye Kausar mujhey

    I am one who weeps at the plight of the Martyr of Kerbala
    Won't the reward be given to me by the Keeper of Kauser (Imam Ali (A))

    The commemoration of Ashura on the 10th of Muharram every year serves to remind us of the sacrifices of the family of the Prophet (S). It also makes us aware of the people, then and now, who tried to destroy Islam and the family of the Prophet (S) and all that they stood for - as well as those who watched, listened and did nothing.

    References:
    [1] Ibn Majah: Sunan, Hadith 144.

    [2] Ibn Jarir: Tarikhu'l Umam wa'l Muluk, vol.13, p.2174.

    [3] Sayyid ibn Ta'us: Maqtalu'l Husain, pp.10-11

    [4] Al-Khatid al-Khuwarazmi: Maqtalu'l Husain ,vol.1, p.88.
  24. Like
    Ali got a reaction from Hameedeh in Jewelry. - What do you wear?   
    Salam :)

    For the past 5 years, I havent ever been seen without my silver rng which says "Allah" on it and my necklace of Imam Ali (as)'s sword.

    No matter where I am, I always have those 2 on :)
  25. Like
    Ali got a reaction from ShiaChat Mod in 504 Gateway Time-out   
    Woohoo!
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