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In the Name of God بسم الله

Mercy

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  1. Thank you @Qa'im for your reply. I assume your post took some time to compose, time you will never regain, time you spent for my sake. May God bless you for your time as well as your gracefulness. I would appreciate a little more of your time to comment on this post of mine. Also, I am interested in your opinion, @Bakir, if you so choose to comment. The appearance of death: 4:157 and for their saying, “We slew the Messiah, Jesus son of Mary, the messenger of God” though they did not slay him; nor did they crucify him, but it appeared so unto them. Those who differ concerning him are in doubt thereof. They have no knowledge of it, but follow only conjecture; they slew him not for certain. 2:154 And say not of those who are slain in the way of God, “They are dead.” Nay, they are alive, but you are unaware. 3:169 And deem not those slain in the way of God to be dead. Rather, they are alive with their Lord, provided for, If a man was slain by a sword, became a martyr and yet is alive, did the sword actually pierce his flesh or did it just appear so? If a man was slain by crucifixion, became a martyr and yet is alive, was his flesh actually harmed or did it just appear so? Was either man even slain, as how it was witnessed by others, or was an other in their stead? How is the one case different from that of Jesus, who supposedly was not even slain?
  2. You are so sure of yourself. If only you knew. God knows. And I will not start acting.
  3. What would I get out of convincing you that I am Shia?
  4. I pretend, why? Because I do not do matam?
  5. No No The Messiah taught about love, its meaning and how to apply it. When you love someone you tend to their needs and make sacrifices in life for their wellbeing. You may sacrifice things like your time or your money for the ones you love, but the greatest sacrifice you could give them is your life because it is all those things. The Messiah was the first to teach about love, love to its truest extent. "This is my commandment: Love each other in the same way I have loved you. There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. You are my friends if you do what I command. [John 15:12–4]" Imam Hussain was political in that he led in matters of state; the Messiah was not political in that he led in matters of the heart. Imam Hussain tried to garner support as a political candidate but was, in a sense, assassinated; the Messiah was executed for teaching a philosophy, upsetting the Jews and thus the stability of Roman Palestine. The significance of the Messiah being crucified, or martyred is that he represented God's love for man, that God loves us so much that he would die for us and sacrifice everything he has. The Messiah is just that, a messenger of God who assumed the role of God, as if an actor, to demonstrate God's love in the greatest sense available to man. “I have loved you even as the Father has loved me . . . [John 15:9]" For the sake of discussion assume what I said is true: is one greater than the other—why?
  6. @shiaman14 Defensive—I guess I misunderstood. If you are interested, shiaman14, to check back tomorrow I will answer you further. It will take some time to write it out. Wow, that's messed up. I will get back to you tomorrow. I am sleepy. Also, I would be happy to PM you the commentary of any verse from The Study Quran if you don't have it. I would recommend buying it. I have quite a few translations but this by far is the best. Simply amazing. It's like my King James Bible if I were protestant. Nice meeting you all. Salam.
  7. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein; Dagli, Caner K.; Dakake, Maria Massi; Lumbard, Joseph E.B.; Rustom, Mohammed (2015-11-17). The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary 4:157 and for their saying, “We slew the Messiah, Jesus son of Mary, the messenger of God”— though they did not slay him; nor did they crucify him, but it appeared so unto them. Those who differ concerning him are in doubt thereof. They have no knowledge of it, but follow only conjecture; they slew him not for certain. Although the Quran addresses and criticizes the Christian belief in the Trinity (v. 171; 5: 73) and the divinity of Jesus (5: 17, 72, 116; 9: 31), this is the only passage that addresses the belief in Christ’s crucifixion and death. It does not come in the context of a critique of Christian belief, however, but rather as part of a lengthy passage criticizing historical incidents of Jewish unfaithfulness to their covenant. It is important to note that here the critique is not aimed directly at the belief in Christ’s crucifixion and death, but rather at the Jews’ claim to have killed him. Their claim, seen as their way of mocking and dismissing Jesus’ prophethood (Z), is understood in the context of the Quranic assertion that the Israelites or Jews rejected some of the prophets that had been sent to them (in v. 155 and elsewhere). Although the verse only directly criticizes a Jewish claim to have killed and crucified Jesus, it is widely understood in the Islamic tradition as meaning that Jesus was not crucified or killed at all; it only appeared so unto them, that is, to the Jews as well as to most of Jesus’ followers. Various accounts are given to explain how it appeared so unto them. According to some commentators, when the Jewish authorities came to arrest Jesus, he was among a group of his followers. They did not know who among them was Jesus, because a Divine ruse had made them all appear the same, and one of Jesus’ followers was thus taken and killed in his place (IK, Ṭ, Z). Some accounts indicate that one of Jesus’ followers in particular volunteered to sacrifice himself by assuming Jesus’ likeness (IK, Ṭ, Z). According to one account, this follower was crucified (i.e., publicly exposed) after being killed (IK). This follows the order mentioned in the verse itself: they did not slay him; nor did they crucify him, and in general, Muslims understood crucifixion as a punishment carried out after death in most, but not all, cases. Another account from Wahb ibn Munabbih (d. early second/ eighth century), an early commentator who brought his knowledge of Judeo-Christian teachings to bear on Quranic interpretation, claims that it was one of Jesus’ perfidious followers (presumably Judas) who, after attempting to betray Jesus, was made to assume Jesus’ appearance and was killed in his stead. (IK, Ṭ, Z). Because most accounts indicate that it appeared not only to the Jews, but also to all or most Christians, that Jesus had been killed, al-Ṭabarī argues that no blame or accusations of dishonesty can be leveled at Christians who believe in Jesus’ death and crucifixion. The idea that someone was killed in Jesus’ stead after having assumed his likeness, voluntarily or otherwise, is found widely throughout the commentary tradition. A notable exception to this is al-Rāzī, who finds the idea that God would perpetrate such a deception in the physical realm, particularly as it relates to individual identity, unacceptable. If we cannot rely on our senses to identify individuals, then the proper application of Islamic Law, which is dependent upon physical witnessing and upon the certainty of people’s identities in matters of marriage and so forth, would be called into doubt. It is worth noting, however, that there are other Quranic accounts of providential Divine “deception,” such as when God is said to have altered the believers’ perception of the enemy army at Badr, so that they would not be discouraged by the enemy’s greater size (see 8: 43 and commentary). Those who differ concerning him may refer specifically to the Jews, who were unsure whether they had really killed Jesus (Ṭ, Z) and so follow only conjecture regarding the matter. Others, however, consider this to refer to the Christians who differ over Jesus’ nature— divine or human— and thus on the issue of whether he was crucified only in his “human” aspect, but not in his “divinity” (Q). Concerning him can also be read as “concerning it,” meaning the entire affair of the crucifixion, a reading preferred by al-Zamakhsharī. They slew him not for certain may refer to Jesus, indicating certainty that he was not slain, in contrast to the “doubts” and “conjectures” of those who differ concerning him. This last line of the verse, however, may be read idiomatically to mean “they did not kill [their doubt] about the matter”; that is, they remained in a state of doubt and conjecture (M, Q). 4:158 But God raised him up unto Himself, and God is Mighty, Wise. See also 3: 55 and commentary. The present verse, along with 3: 55, represents the source of the Islamic belief that Jesus, as in the Christian tradition, ascended directly to God. Raised up here translates rafaʿa, which literally means “to raise,” rather than baʿatha, which is used elsewhere to mean “to resurrect” after death. The verse is thus understood as referring to Jesus’ direct ascension from the earthly realm to the Presence of God without the intervening event of death. The Quran is clear elsewhere, however, that Jesus is not Divine (5: 116). Logically, then, he must share in human mortality. Islamic tradition holds Jesus will return near the end times to fight the Antichrist (al-Dajjāl) and will thereafter eventually die and be resurrected with the rest of humanity. Cf. 19: 33, where Jesus affirms his future death and “resurrection,” saying, Peace be upon me the day I was born, the day I die, and the day I am raised alive (ubʿathu ḥayyan, from baʿatha). The Gospel account indicates that Jesus’ followers witnessed, or at least believed in, his death, resurrection, and ascension. However, because the Quran seems to present death and direct ascension in contradistinction to each other when it says, They slew him not for certain. But God raised him up unto Himself (vv. 157– 58), some Islamic accounts understand these as representing two separate beliefs about Jesus’ fate. Ibn Kathīr, for example, indicates that some of Jesus’ followers witnessed his ascension and so were aware that he had not died, while others witnessed his “seeming” death and so believed the Jewish account that they had slain him. It should be noted, however, that the idea of resurrection even in this life, rather than between this world and the next, is not unacceptable from the Quranic perspective; see, for example, 2: 259, where God caused a man to die for a hundred years, then raised him up (baʿathahu, referring to resurrection, not ascension).
  8. Yeah, but I just can't accept that. I had a deep spiritual experience upon reading the gospels, such that it has fundamentally changed who I am. I am slower to anger, more compassionate and kind, and now I have this feeling of pity for God's creations whereas before I didn't, or it was less so. Islam has never had this dramatic of effect on me. And this change has all come from believing that Jesus was crucified and resurrected. It may sound silly from an Islamic point of view but I don't know how else to explain it.
  9. Good advice. Thank you. The problem I have is that I am Shia and always have been, and I love the Ahlul Bayt. I love reading Kitab al-Ghayba, al-Kafi and the like. I have spent hundreds of dollars on books. Now having doubt for the first time shakes me up. I read the Quran daily. I probably read too much into it but I see the Ahlul Bayt throughout the Quran. For example, I interpret this verses to refer to Muhammad and Ali : 2:248 And their prophet said to them, “Truly the sign of his sovereignty shall be that the ark come to you bearing tranquility from your Lord and a remnant left by the House of Moses and the House of Aaron, borne by the angels. Truly in that is a sign for you, if you are believers.” 12:89 He said, “Do you know what you have done with Joseph and his brother, when you were ignorant?” They said, “Art thou indeed Joseph?” He said, “I am Joseph and this is my brother. God has been gracious unto us. Verily whosoever is reverent and patient— surely God neglects not the reward of the virtuous.” I am wondering how I reconcile the two, that is belief in some tenets of Christianity and Islam. I do not think I could ever abandon my religion because it is so much a part of who I am. This is my problem. Perhaps I should have made this more clear from the start.
  10. Have I disrespected you? Why are disrespecting me? What is positive about Trump? Why correct me on my choice of the word "argue?" I would bet your choice of words and your tone would be different in the presence of the Prophet or Imams. Really guy? Do you not recollect the saying, you are either brothers in religion or the same in creation? Just because you assume I am not a Shia, or even a Muslim for that matter does not mean you should voice your assumption. Have some grace. The effect it has upon individuals and society. I am not talking about a muscle. heart : the emotional or moral as distinguished from the intellectual nature ;generous disposition : passion <a leader with heart> love, affection <won her heart> ;courage, ardor <never lost heart> Because Jesus was God's Word he was without sin and thus innocent of any crime, and yet he was tried and executed. During the time of Jesus the statement was made that God does not leave a life in misery, hence the resurrection. The Jews of that time were of two camps, the Sadducees who did not believe in resurrection, and the Pharisees who did. The Messiah proved two things, that God is loving and that he will resurrect us. Remember, before Jesus there was debate and no clear answer. Jesus made clear to them what they had forgotten (43:63). Have you even read the gospels? And I think we have figured you out as well.
  11. Yeah bro, I know how it can be. Just take your time though. Good — Fast — Cheap (pick two)
  12. @Enlightened Follower You have 400 posts and half of them are in this thread. You are posting like its going out of style. Kidding, but half serious. I will respond, it will just take me a while. I won't be able to get to all of them though.
  13. Thank you. Do you doubt what I say and think I am not being truthful? If so, why? *** The Holy Spirit does not reside in all of us; some have it and some do not. I am not talking about being content or being happy; I am talking about joy. *** I am glad this thread interested you. I have to disagree with you and say that Jesus leads you to the Holy Spirit, and not the other way around. I do not know if what you are saying is Christian doctrine or a personal belief. I do not have any questions about Christianity, but thanks for offering. You see, I am Muslim. I am just having a moment of doubt, which is healthy.
  14. So if I said, "the Quran is true because the Quran says it is true" is not a valid argument, would you agree with that? That is irrelevant to the case at hand. Is it valid to say that Muhammad should be disregarded because he is a prophet the same as Mani (Manichaeism) before him? Each case should evaluated in itself. Are you a takfiri? *** Were Jesus to have been raised up and not crucified he would not have suffered. Were Jesus to have been crucified he would have suffered. Because Jesus was God's Word he was without sin and thus innocent of any crime, and yet he was tried and executed. During the time of Jesus the statement was made that God does not leave a life in misery, hence the resurrection. The Jews of that time were of two camps, the Sadducees who did not believe in resurrection, and the Pharisees who did. The Messiah proved two things, that God is loving and that he will resurrect us. Remember, before Jesus there was debate and no clear answer. Jesus made clear to them what they had forgotten (43:63). Were Jesus not slain there would be no resurrection, no proof that the suffering shall find salvation from their despair. Having faith in the Messiah is having faith that no matter what happens God is with the "poor in spirit." I never said anything about God becoming man. I do not believe that because the Quran clearly states such, which is logical. People of that time were ignorant, they thought that God had a child like Zeus had with Heracles. It is the merit of the message. Does it produce good fruit? A tree that produces no fruit is pulled up and burned. Of what use is it? I would say the Holy Spirit testifies to its validity. If only you felt it the way I do, even if you did not care for it. The Quran is a confirmation of what came before it. *** I agree. The Messiah was not political. Political authority has to do with knowledge. Spiritual authority has to do with compassion. Name three messiahs. *** No. I would argue that a resurrected messiah gives more glory than a non-resurrected one. It would depend upon which one yields the greatest fruit. Begotten, consubstantial with the Father means that God and Jesus had that same nature. Another way of saying it is that God and Jesus shared the same heart, or different hearts of the same kind. *** The Holy Spirit dwells within the Kaaba that is our body. It is distinct in a sense, but if I ask myself if it is that God I feel, then yes it is God although he is not limited to me alone. *** The Spirit within me is distinct in a sense but yet God himself, and it acts from me upon other people in this way: "I will give thanks to you, O LORD; for though you were angry with me, your anger turned away and you did comfort me." *** I do not know what you mean by "faith is lonely" but I will take a shot at addressing it and run the risk of sounding foolish. Share my enthusiasm because you would not be lonely anymore. We would embrace each other with such joy that we would weep.
  15. I never said Jesus was God incarnate. There has been more than one king and more than one leader, so why is Jesus the only messiah? What did Jesus know that God's Messenger did not? Then the issue would be, how do I share my enthusiasm with my brothers and sisters and with the hope that they will feel enthused with me? It is quite lonely if you know what I mean. It is hard to explain but I think I feel what the Christians call the Holy Spirit. I do not know if Christians would agree though. It may sound strange but I feel as though the Spirit of God dwells inside me. It gives me so much joy. However this feeling only comes on when I affirm a resurrected messiah, and I can explain that further if you are interested. Jesus talks about the Holy Spirit in the Gospel of John and how it is connected to his resurrection, and from this derives my joy. I laugh as I write this, thinking of @justbrowsing. What I am saying totally sounds just as he said.
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