Jump to content
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!) ×
Guests can now reply in ALL forum topics (No registration required!)
In the Name of God بسم الله

Inner Peace

Unregistered
  • Content Count

    82
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from LizaGrey in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  2. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Salamislam. in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  3. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Hidaren in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  4. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from alHussein in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  5. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Don'tMakeAس in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  6. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ShiaChat Mod in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  7. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Ashvazdanghe in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  8. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Soldiers and Saffron in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  9. Like
    Inner Peace reacted to Ali-F in Are the good Muslims left alone?   
    Back then  (when I was a kid) I loved New Years eve. Fireworks, loud noises and good food.
    Now I realize that people in the West (young generation) usually celebrate with alcohol and so on. The worst part is that even Muslims participate in this (+ Shia-muslims). They gather around alcohol, loud music and perhaps women. God forbid they may also drink alcohol. Personally a Muslim (who I know) admitted on Snapchat that he drank wine. 
    As a Muslim, who strive to do good and follow the path of God, I find these  gatherings sad. Where are we left? Some (including me) don't have other likeminded people in the city. We may find it difficult actually to find someone who follows the path of God. This makes me wonder what we have of solutions?
    And no, I'm not lonely. I have non-Muslim friends and also Muslims (however not 'good Muslims). I also have a happy life but New Years Eve makes me quite hopeless: Is the Muslim youth in a crisis? Why the alcohol and party? Why not doing other halal things? 
    Arghhhh.
  10. Like
    Inner Peace reacted to Husayni in Are the good Muslims left alone?   
    Salam,
    Unfortunately, the Muslim youth (this generation) has completely lost what is the meaning of Islam. Typically, the only words you'll hear from them are "I have to pray", or "I have to fast", as if it's a duty and a burden on them. The spiritual aspect is completely gone, as @ali_fatheroforphans mentioned.
    I know many Muslims (or who claim to be) who drink alcohol, some even admit to it (why? I may never know), and MANY who eat haram food.
    It's also not a surprise to me why so many Muslims are leaving Islam to become atheists, or other non-Muslim beliefs.
    A BIG role in this is lack of Islamic  knowledge. If you ever bring something up about Islam or religion, they will have that gloomy look on their face and sometimes may say "Why are we talking about this?"
    What I really dislike is how Muslim youth today pray but don't know what they're saying, they fast but don't know why they are fasting, they say "Oh this has gelatin I can't eat it" but entirely don't know what they're saying, and many more of these situations.
    I ask honestly why are you following the religion if you don't even know anything about it? Ask them who's Imam Hassan (a), they'll say, "oh he's the guy who died at Karbala". Ask them who's Imam Ali (a) they say, "He was that really strong guy". Ask them who's Imam Muhammad al-Jawad they'll say, "who?".
    I do agree with you on these aspects, even though Islam is rapidly increasing in number, the youth just listen to what their parents say, they don't bother researching the spiritual reason behind their actions or sometimes they don't even perform their wajabat.
    May Allah guide all the Muslim youth.
  11. Like
    Inner Peace reacted to ali_fatheroforphans in Are the good Muslims left alone?   
    The problem is that we've made Islam simply a religion of laws with no spiritual aspect. It's all about legal issues - something is either harram or halal.
    The most important aspect of Islam - being ethics and spirituality is completely lost. We live in a fast-paced world where everyone is worried about materialistic pursuits.
    The younger generation haven't understood the message of Islam to start with. They want to somehow follow Islam without purifying their souls.
    Therefore, someone who doesn't understand the spiritual message of Islam won't understand the nature of the soul. Then no one will understand the consequence of drinking, mixing with women, harram gatherings, partying hard etc.
  12. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Sirius_Bright in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  13. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Intellectual Resistance in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  14. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Husayni in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  15. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ali_fatheroforphans in Thoughts 2018   
    New year new thoughts thread! 
    Special thanks to a person who wishes to remain anonymous. 

  16. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from rkazmi33 in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    Regarding dependence, even back in the days when females were more dependent on men it was problematic if things didn't go well (e.g., husband passes away). However, due to various reasons females didn't have the opportunity to establish independence as much back then. Now that women do have the opportunity to take more control over their own lives, they recognize that they can and should prevent the risk of losing everything in a relationship and being left with no support.
    Yes you are right that in some areas of the world partners are more dependent on each and dependence will typically lead into a higher likelihood of remaining married. However, I would argue the success of a marriage should not be measured based on the longevity of the marriage but rather the quality of the marriage. Someone may stay in a marriage due to financial dependence, but I don't necessarily think staying in a marriage because of dependence is a good thing. In a marriage you can't control every factor, what if your partner for whatever reasons decides to step out of the marriage. I read a quote along the lines of, your career, education and money won't one day wake up and decide to leave you. Now of course I understand this quote is problematic, but nonetheless, women can still have a stack of degrees and become a house wife if they want, but at least they have a backup and potential for employment if things go wrong. With so many degrees available nowadays through different mediums (online, in class, etc) and so many areas to work in, you can study while being married (I'm assuming if you don't have kids and you're a housewife you probably have some free time). Contrary to popular belief, education of females (especially in academically prestigious fields) is being recognized more in some Eastern countries compared to many Western countries. In Iran, 70% of engineers are females, while in Canada only 13% of engineers are females.
    I don't see how the female rejecting the guy who was not raised in the West is an issue. There are compatibility and cultural issues in western-eastern marriages. When individuals have very different upbringings it may be harder to get along and make mutual life decisions (e.g., raising kids). Naturally your upbringing affects your opinions, perspectives and life outlook. I would say even language is a barrier. For example, even though I'm bilingual I am more comfortable and have an easier time expressing myself and engaging in intellectual conversations in English rather than my mother tongue (which I fluently speak, write and read in). Majority of the females I know all unanimously agree they would not marry a guy raised in the East, at least, they highly prefer not to and are avoiding it. They all prefer to marry someone from a different nationality that's raised in the West than marry someone from the same nationality raised in the East. I know a couple girls in our community who married guys raised in the East and all of them were very firm with saying it is extremely difficult (they didn't regret it but they don't recommend it).  

    When we criticize the independence of women in the West we often forget Khadija (as) was a successful business woman and very established prior to marrying the prophet. She was a divorcee who proposed marriage to the prophet. It's amazing how many cultural stereotypes the prophet's life breaks.
  17. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ali_fatheroforphans in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    Yea, I never lived back home but that's been the case with most families I know too. Migration comes with so many difficulties that often give a couple experiences that help them with bonding.
  18. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ali_fatheroforphans in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    So I'm not sure based on what data you're suggesting that emotional dependence or love amongst partners in the East is more than the West? Where exactly are you getting this information that this is a western culture female issue?
    That's a specific example but actually for the most part I'd say females want to spend more time with their partners and need more attention than vice versa. To my knowledge, this has been supported by studies, hence, the stereotypical term "clingy" is used usually for females. Generally what we know about female psychology conflicts your specific example, so the trend is not what you say necessarily. Regardless, emotional dependence is very individual and couple dependent. Some people are more independent emotionally and others aren't. Thus, why two good people may not be compatible with each other in marriage.
    This is not evidenced supported but I actually think Western society can be more isolating (especially when you're Muslim) so it would logically make sense to turn to a spouse more. There's always something social happening in Eastern countries, if anything the men and women are socializing and spending time with other people that are not their partners more than in the West. 
  19. Like
    Inner Peace reacted to ali_fatheroforphans in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    Man we should support all Muslim women regardless of the fact that they don't wear hijab. They go through different struggles and who are we to judge and say that they shouldn't work as a result. This mentality needs to stop. 
  20. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ali_fatheroforphans in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    Regarding dependence, even back in the days when females were more dependent on men it was problematic if things didn't go well (e.g., husband passes away). However, due to various reasons females didn't have the opportunity to establish independence as much back then. Now that women do have the opportunity to take more control over their own lives, they recognize that they can and should prevent the risk of losing everything in a relationship and being left with no support.
    Yes you are right that in some areas of the world partners are more dependent on each and dependence will typically lead into a higher likelihood of remaining married. However, I would argue the success of a marriage should not be measured based on the longevity of the marriage but rather the quality of the marriage. Someone may stay in a marriage due to financial dependence, but I don't necessarily think staying in a marriage because of dependence is a good thing. In a marriage you can't control every factor, what if your partner for whatever reasons decides to step out of the marriage. I read a quote along the lines of, your career, education and money won't one day wake up and decide to leave you. Now of course I understand this quote is problematic, but nonetheless, women can still have a stack of degrees and become a house wife if they want, but at least they have a backup and potential for employment if things go wrong. With so many degrees available nowadays through different mediums (online, in class, etc) and so many areas to work in, you can study while being married (I'm assuming if you don't have kids and you're a housewife you probably have some free time). Contrary to popular belief, education of females (especially in academically prestigious fields) is being recognized more in some Eastern countries compared to many Western countries. In Iran, 70% of engineers are females, while in Canada only 13% of engineers are females.
    I don't see how the female rejecting the guy who was not raised in the West is an issue. There are compatibility and cultural issues in western-eastern marriages. When individuals have very different upbringings it may be harder to get along and make mutual life decisions (e.g., raising kids). Naturally your upbringing affects your opinions, perspectives and life outlook. I would say even language is a barrier. For example, even though I'm bilingual I am more comfortable and have an easier time expressing myself and engaging in intellectual conversations in English rather than my mother tongue (which I fluently speak, write and read in). Majority of the females I know all unanimously agree they would not marry a guy raised in the East, at least, they highly prefer not to and are avoiding it. They all prefer to marry someone from a different nationality that's raised in the West than marry someone from the same nationality raised in the East. I know a couple girls in our community who married guys raised in the East and all of them were very firm with saying it is extremely difficult (they didn't regret it but they don't recommend it).  

    When we criticize the independence of women in the West we often forget Khadija (as) was a successful business woman and very established prior to marrying the prophet. She was a divorcee who proposed marriage to the prophet. It's amazing how many cultural stereotypes the prophet's life breaks.
  21. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from AmirAlmuminin Lover in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    Regarding dependence, even back in the days when females were more dependent on men it was problematic if things didn't go well (e.g., husband passes away). However, due to various reasons females didn't have the opportunity to establish independence as much back then. Now that women do have the opportunity to take more control over their own lives, they recognize that they can and should prevent the risk of losing everything in a relationship and being left with no support.
    Yes you are right that in some areas of the world partners are more dependent on each and dependence will typically lead into a higher likelihood of remaining married. However, I would argue the success of a marriage should not be measured based on the longevity of the marriage but rather the quality of the marriage. Someone may stay in a marriage due to financial dependence, but I don't necessarily think staying in a marriage because of dependence is a good thing. In a marriage you can't control every factor, what if your partner for whatever reasons decides to step out of the marriage. I read a quote along the lines of, your career, education and money won't one day wake up and decide to leave you. Now of course I understand this quote is problematic, but nonetheless, women can still have a stack of degrees and become a house wife if they want, but at least they have a backup and potential for employment if things go wrong. With so many degrees available nowadays through different mediums (online, in class, etc) and so many areas to work in, you can study while being married (I'm assuming if you don't have kids and you're a housewife you probably have some free time). Contrary to popular belief, education of females (especially in academically prestigious fields) is being recognized more in some Eastern countries compared to many Western countries. In Iran, 70% of engineers are females, while in Canada only 13% of engineers are females.
    I don't see how the female rejecting the guy who was not raised in the West is an issue. There are compatibility and cultural issues in western-eastern marriages. When individuals have very different upbringings it may be harder to get along and make mutual life decisions (e.g., raising kids). Naturally your upbringing affects your opinions, perspectives and life outlook. I would say even language is a barrier. For example, even though I'm bilingual I am more comfortable and have an easier time expressing myself and engaging in intellectual conversations in English rather than my mother tongue (which I fluently speak, write and read in). Majority of the females I know all unanimously agree they would not marry a guy raised in the East, at least, they highly prefer not to and are avoiding it. They all prefer to marry someone from a different nationality that's raised in the West than marry someone from the same nationality raised in the East. I know a couple girls in our community who married guys raised in the East and all of them were very firm with saying it is extremely difficult (they didn't regret it but they don't recommend it).  

    When we criticize the independence of women in the West we often forget Khadija (as) was a successful business woman and very established prior to marrying the prophet. She was a divorcee who proposed marriage to the prophet. It's amazing how many cultural stereotypes the prophet's life breaks.
  22. Like
    Inner Peace reacted to ali_fatheroforphans in Question: West/East Marriage Culture   
    I know some eastern women put up with their husbands, even after being beaten and abused, as they are very dependant on them. I mean, some women go to the extent of obeying their husband soo much and this is just pure injustice!
    As for your question about a guy being rejected because he was Eastern - I feel it is a very personal choice as long as she doesn't think Eastern men are inferior to Western men. The choice could be associated with a lot of factors, like personality clash etc
    I personally would find it easier to get along with Western Muslim girls, because their way of thinking, interacting etc would be similar to mine. However, I'm okay with marrying an Eastern Muslim girl if I get along with her.
     
     
  23. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from Islandsandmirrors in Toddler nutrition   
    Walaykum Salam,
    Picky eating is completely normal in toddlers and shouldn't be a concern. Try to minimize distractions and set regular meal time patterns. Toddlers often imitate older siblings. Remember appetite generally goes down at around 12 months. Allow their independence and curiosity. 
    Aversion to meat in toddlers is very common behavioural concern for parents. Don't force your child to eat meat if he/she doesn't want it. There shouldn't be a power struggle when it comes to eating. Use alternative vegetarian or vegan options. Food complementation is also a great way to get complete proteins. 
    No don't give a toddler smaller amounts of vitamin beverage. Iron anemia is the most common deficiency in North American toddlers but iron toxicity is also the most common toxicity in toddlers. He won't take the chewable gummies either?
    Since he doesn't eat bean and meat good sources of iron rich foods for toddlers are fortified cereals (often very high in iron), raisins, green peas and dried apricots. 
    Fibre, iron, calcium, zinc, vitamin D and fluid are important for toddlers. 
  24. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from notme in Toddler nutrition   
    Walaykum Salam,
    Picky eating is completely normal in toddlers and shouldn't be a concern. Try to minimize distractions and set regular meal time patterns. Toddlers often imitate older siblings. Remember appetite generally goes down at around 12 months. Allow their independence and curiosity. 
    Aversion to meat in toddlers is very common behavioural concern for parents. Don't force your child to eat meat if he/she doesn't want it. There shouldn't be a power struggle when it comes to eating. Use alternative vegetarian or vegan options. Food complementation is also a great way to get complete proteins. 
    No don't give a toddler smaller amounts of vitamin beverage. Iron anemia is the most common deficiency in North American toddlers but iron toxicity is also the most common toxicity in toddlers. He won't take the chewable gummies either?
    Since he doesn't eat bean and meat good sources of iron rich foods for toddlers are fortified cereals (often very high in iron), raisins, green peas and dried apricots. 
    Fibre, iron, calcium, zinc, vitamin D and fluid are important for toddlers. 
  25. Like
    Inner Peace got a reaction from ShiaChat Mod in Question to God   
    If you could ask God one question what would it be?
×
×
  • Create New...