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In the Name of God بسم الله

wahashimi

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  1. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from Bibi in Ramadhan Lectures   
    Salaam,

    Is he one of those Iraqis who will never marry a non-Iraqi or would he not mind non-Iraqi sisters?

    Or is he the type of Iraqi who does whatever his parents say? I.e. its his mum's decision?

    Wasalaam
  2. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from DutchSeeker in JINNS   
    Salaam,

    When I was in Iran, I was staying with some scholars and they offered me a chance to come with them to the desert where they were going to meet and talk with a VERY knowledgeable Jinn ( A shia Jinn)

    At the time I was too scared to go so I turned it down, I really wish I didn't.

    I also remember being told about a Mutjahid who's knowledge was so vast and his connection to Allah(swt) was so strong, that he attended the Janaza of a Jinn (in the Jinn realm) who had died, the reason he attended it was because this Jinn was present with Imam Hussain(AS) at Karbala. I think this Jinn was one of the oldest Jinns in existence but I am not sure.

    Also, I cannot remember the Mutjahid's name, I dont think he is alive now.

    I just found it so amazing Mashallah.

    Khuda Hafiz
  3. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from MohammadAli1993 in Karbala and Shaam   
    Salaam Alaykum Bros and sis,

    The reason I ask this is because on many occassions I have heard ppl saying things like

    "If a momin woman was raped multiple times in her life, and had to raise illegitamate children, at the same time she kept her hijab and kept her religion, if she was abused as a child by her own parents, and yet she still loves Allah(swt), surely isn't that more than what Bibi Zaineb went through?"

    To be honest I didn't have an answer. This brother was referring to the many women in Yugoslavia and Palestine and other places around the world. He also showed me a video of this Bosnian Hijabi girl, she must have only been in her mid 20s, she was crying and saying basically, "If the world wont help us then please at least send us contraceptives to protect us from the gang rapes we recieve from soldiers every day". When I saw that video I swear it really killed me inside.

    To be honest, I really am not sure nemore. I mean I have heard certain things that there were women who were raped at Karbala. But I have never heard that it was any of the Masooms. Some of the other women apparantly.

    Now when I look at it like that....majority of the women in Karbala saw their own families die on the battle field just like Bibi Zaineb(AS), all of them were rounded up and chained jus like Bibi Zaineb(AS), however if some of them were raped and had to bear illegitimate children, which DID NOT happen to Bibi Zaineb(AS) would u then say that what they went through was worse than what Bibi Zaineb(AS) went through?

    I guess in my mind I think to myself sometimes that more depraved things COULD have happened to the Bibis at Karbala and Shaam but they didn't, but they are happening to Muslim Women all over the world today.

    I am not sure.........think I will ask an Alim about this subject??

    A part of me believes that the "Tragedy" of Karbala is not WHAT happened, but "WHO" it happened to...that is the tragedy.

    well....glad I got that off my chest.

    Wasalaam
  4. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from Footfetish in foot fetish?   
    Salaam SISTERS,

    From a brothers perspective, u should have pretty feet for your husbands....remember on the wedding night we have to wash your feet....

    remember that PLEASE :) lol

    Wasalaam
  5. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from Freeurmind in Sunni Marriage   
    children will invariably follow the mother's belief as long as the husband and wife are balanced people
  6. Like
    wahashimi got a reaction from 133ali in Should Shias have their own State in Pakistan?   
    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/EJ08Df08.html

    Shi'ite warning shot in Pakistan
    By B Raman

    When the Shi'ites of Pakistan are angry, the Pakistani army and its Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) tremble.

    Because they have not forgotten what happened in 1988. Faced with a revolt by the Shi'ites of the Northern Areas (NA - Gilgit and Baltistan) of Jammu & Kashmir (J&K), under occupation by the Pakistan army, for a separate Shi'ite state called the Karakoram, the Pakistan army transported Osama bin Laden's tribal hordes into Gilgit and let them loose on the Shi'ites. They went around massacring hundreds of Shi'ites.

    The resulting Shi'ite anger most likely led to the death of military ruler General Zia ul-Haq in a plane crash in August 1988, the end of the military regime and the subsequent assassination of Lieutenant-General Fazle Haq, a retired army officer, close to Zia and hated by the Shi'ites because of his suspected role in the assassination of a respected Shi'ite leader. The inquiry report on the crash of Zia's plane has not been released by the Pakistan army, but many in Pakistan believe that the crash was caused by a Shi'ite airman from Gilgit, who was a member of the crew.

    The army and the ISI imposed an effective iron curtain around the NA after the genocide of the Shi'ites of the area by bin Laden's hordes. As a result, the world was ignorant of the extent of the anti-Shi'ite carnage until the Herald, the monthly journal of the prestigious Dawn group of Karachi, pierced the curtain in its issue of May, 1990. It was helped by leaks from a somewhat tamed ISI, then headed by the late Major-General Kallue, a retired officer of the army close to the late Zulfiquar Ali Bhutto, who had been hand-picked from retirement by Benazir Bhutto after she came to power in an attempt (since proved futile) to reform the ISI.

    The Herald wrote, "In May,1988, low-intensity political rivalry and sectarian tension ignited into full-scale carnage as thousands of armed tribesmen from outside Gilgit district invaded Gilgit along the Karakoram Highway. Nobody stopped them. They destroyed crops and houses, lynched and burnt people to death in the villages around Gilgit town. The number of dead and injured was put in the hundreds. But numbers alone tell nothing of the savagery of the invading hordes and the chilling impact it has left on these peaceful valleys."

    Now the Shi'ites of Pakistan are angry again and on the warpath. This is evident from the daring assassination of Maulana Azam Tariq, the head of the anti-Shi'ite Sunni extremist Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) in Islamabad, Pakistan's capital, on October 6.

    They have many grounds for anger against Azam Tariq - for the role of the SSP in the massacre of hundreds of Hazara Shi'ites of Afghanistan before September 11 because they were sympathetic to the Northern Alliance of Afghanistan; for the SSP's proximity to bin Laden's al-Qaeda and the International Islamic Front (IIF); for its targeted killing of dozens of Shi'ite doctors and other intellectuals in Karachi since President General Pervez Musharraf came to power in October1999; and for its massacre of the Gilgitis of Karachi and the Hazara and other Shi'ites of Balochistan since the beginning of this year.

    The latest incident of massacre of Shi'ites took place in Karachi on October 3 when unidentified gunmen, suspected to be from the SSP, attacked a bus carrying employees of the Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission, killing at least six people and wounding eight. All the injured and four of the dead were Shi'ites, while two – the bus driver Raza Ali and a Pakistan army soldier Mohammad Rafiq – were Sunnis. The Shi'ites of Karachi have viewed this incident as a continuation of earlier massacres in Karachi and Balochistan and feel that the SSP has embarked on anti-Shi'ite carnage in different parts of the country due to a suspicion that officers of the US's Federal Bureau of Investigation, now based in Pakistan, have been using Shi'ites as human agents in their hunt for bin Laden and the dregs of the al-Qaeda and the IIF.

    While the ISI and the army have remained silent on who is responsible for the anti-Shi'ite massacres since the beginning of this year, police officers in Karachi say that the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LEJ), the militant wing of the SSP, the Harkat-ul-Mujahideen al-Alami (HUM-AA) and the Harkat-ul- Jihad-al-Islami (HUJI) have formed a new outfit called 313, which has been operating on behalf of the IIF. According to them, while its attacks are presently directed at Shi'ites, it is likely to target American and other Western lives and interests soon. All three are members of the IIF.

    It has not yet been established who was responsible for the assassination of Azam Tariq, but the needle of suspicion points to members of a new, as yet unidentified Shi'ite terrorist organization. It is seen as an act of reprisal for the earlier massacres of Shi'ites in Balochistan and Sindh.

    The Shi'ites have cause for anger against Musharraf, too. He banned on August 14, 2001, the SSP and the Tehriq-e-Jaffria Pakistan (TEJ), a Shi'ite organization, after declaring them terrorist organizations. He further banned on January 15, 2002, the LEJ and the Sipah Mohammad, the militant wing of the TEJ. Shi'ites complain that while the ban against their organizations have been enforced strictly, the bans on the SSP and the LEJ have not been.

    Surprisingly, and much to the anger of Shi'ites, Musharraf facilitated the election of Azam Tariq to the National Assembly in October last year by ordering the withdrawal of cases pending against him under the Anti-Terrorism Act. Azam Tariq denied any association with the SSP, and announced the formation of a new organization called the Millat-e-Islamia Pakistan, but the Shi'ites believe that it is the SSP, which is now functioning under the new name to circumvent the ban, and that Azam Tariq continued to direct the activities of the SSP and the LEJ from his safe sanctuary as a member of the National Assembly.

    Are there any signs of the Shi'ite anger turning against the army, with unpredictable consequences for Musharraf and his military rule? None yet, but one has to watch carefully.

    B Raman is Additional Secretary (ret), Cabinet Secretariat, Government of India, and presently director, Institute For Topical Studies, Chennai; former member of the National Security Advisory Board of the Government of India. E-Mail: corde@vsnl.com. He was also head of the counter-terrorism division of the Research & Analysis Wing, India's external intelligence agency, from 1988 to August, 1994.
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