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In the Name of God بسم الله

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/12/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Abu Hadi

    Nonislamic burial

    It's kind of long, so I'll summarize, As some of you know, I am a revert and most of my family are not muslim. They are American, Christian, Caucasian (aka White people). My parent's divorced when I was 6 years old and after that point, I barely saw my father until I was in my late teen years. At the same time, my Grandfather, my father's father, kind of picked up the slack and we did alot of things together when I was young and he was a big influence on me. He was a carpenter by trade and he taught me alot about woodworking, history, etc. He was known in the community for being generous, kind, and honest. He liked to read, but he wasn't an intellectual. He was an American Soldier in World War II and captured by the German's and spent time as a prisoner in a concentration camp (which he escaped from) so he would sometimes talk about that but mostly other things, because he tried to always be positive and not dwell too much on sorry and pain. So he passed away in 2015, the same year I went to Hajj. I told people that I was going to do Salat for him at Maqam Ibrahim and that I would do dua' for him when I was next to the Kaaba. Most people (even here on SC) told me not to bother and that he passed away as a Christian (a kafir) so there is no hope for him and plus he was an American soldier so he is thalim, etc. So I thought, well I'll do it anyway, maybe it will help him. So I went to Hajj and did the things I said I would do. Then about a week after I came back from Hajj I had a dream. I was sitting in a big room, it looked like a waiting room for a doctor's office, but it was bigger with alot of chairs and benches. There was noone else in the waiting area except me sitting there. Then I saw a grey figure, like a shape (but I could tell somehow that it was my Grandfather) running toward me. He came up and hugged me and he was smiling, and he said 'I made it!' and he didn't say anything else that I can remember. Then the dream was over. I am still not exactly sure what it means, but I think I do. Anyway, I think me doing dua' for him did do something for him, though I'm not exactly sure what. So my point is that you should do it anyway, because you never know.
  2. 2 points
    dragonxx

    Do you believe that...?

    Only Allah can judge I guess.
  3. 2 points
    Not necessarily. The death penalty is permissible but I am not aware of where it absolutely must be applied. The judge has the right to discretion when applying sentence. Mitigating factors can be taken into account such as mental health issues, circumstance, power position of the individuals involved etc. Countries applying Sharia law differ in their interpretation of when the death penalty should be used. Tunisia, for example, rarely uses the death penalty. Then again, there is forgiveness by family members and the possibility of blood price. Muslim family members who forgive the killer of their loved ones are definitely saying no to the death penalty. If it is applied, it is yet another life taken and it has no constructive purpose other than to hurt another family. The woman in the film clip above wants to have her son's death have some sense of meaning so it is not just a senseless loss. If she can turn this guy's life around, she can benefit his family and hers and is ultimately working for the greater good of the community. Being a Muslim means you accept that the death penalty is permissible, but you do not have to support its application. My biggest objection is that it is grossly disproportionately applied to people with low social-economic status in both Muslim and non Muslim countries and therefore open to abuse. I dont know either. I know that Saudi applies the death penalty as a punishment for more than just murder; they have a myriad of reasons as to why they execute people, including political, so it would be hard to correlate. It is easier just to look at countries that do not have the death penalty vs countries that do not have the death penalty and then. compare violent crime statistics
  4. 2 points
    Abu Nur

    Fasting And Doubt

    Wa Aleikum Salaam, You don't need to repeat your fast. When one rinses his mouth with water because it has dried due to thirst and the water uncontrollably goes down one's throat, qadha has to be given. Similarly, as a recommended precaution, one should give a qadha if the mouthwash was for a wudhu for Mustahab prayers, and the water went down the throat. But if he forgets that he has kept a fast, or if he does the mouthwash, not because of thirst, but for a wudhu for an obligatory prayers and water is uncontrollably swallowed, there will be no qadha. If a person breaks his fast due to duress, helplessness or taqayyah, he will observe qadha of the fast, but it is not obligatory on him to give a Kaffarah. - Ayotullah Sistani
  5. 2 points
    Men living in an islamic country also have the right to not be distracted by women who dress immodestly.
  6. 2 points
    You need to call both the Police as well as your Insurance Co. and inform them of everything he’s doing. He knows the fault was his and he’s trying to intimidate you. At this point you have his info so just give it to the Police. Usually, guys like this are all talk and cower into a corner when the Police get involved.
  7. 2 points
    Abu Hadi

    Nonislamic burial

    The funeral is more for the community than for that person, in that it is wajib kifayyat (wajib as a community) to give the person who is muslim/a a proper burial (ghusl, kaffan, kabr, etc). If they fail to do this, and they have the ability to do it, they committed a sin. The Holy Prophet(p.b.u.h) used to punish the criminals, but after he would give them a proper burial and he would do Dua' for them. It may or may not help the individual, but he is showing that this is our responsibility as a community, and doing this keeps the community together and not doing it tears the community apart. It is more for the living than the dead. How the person will be affected in the Barzakh is the result of what they did in their life, not what happened after they had already passed away. If you want to help a person who is passed away, do dua' for them or read quran for them or both. This actually does help them(unless they are completely faithless), alot and also helps you by reminding you of Allah(s.w.a). If it doesn't help them, at least it helps you. I have a story about this from my own life, which I will post if requested.
  8. 2 points
    I will change around some things: (1) Take my children to the mosque quite often, even if they are a toddler. (2) Emphasis the importance of Islamic knowledge when they are young. I would happily read them bedtime Islamic stories. (3) I would never fight/argue with my wife in front of them. (4) Will be very open with them, so they don't feel judged when asking personal questions One thing I love about my parents is that they never backbite about anyone, and they're very humble. I never hear my parents boast on about me and my siblings unlike most Pakistani parents.
  9. 1 point
    Hameedeh

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    If you wanted a new device as an Eid or birthday gift, what would you ask for? iPad or other tablet?
  10. 1 point
    I’m wondering whether people are choosing to raise their children the same as they were raised or differently and if so what changes are you making ? Obviously raising your child Muslim but how are you bringing this in to his/ her life? How are you teaching about other religions and cultures?
  11. 1 point
    Salam since their was a topic should women be forced to wear hijab I find this subject very fitting
  12. 1 point
    Does anyone else have this problem? : I have mood-swings (as a result of brain-damage). This makes having an objective and consistent opinion on just about anything almost impossible. This is especially the case with my Religious Belief. I look back and think - did I really believe/do/say that? And social media can be a curse as much as a blessing.
  13. 1 point
    ShiaMan14

    Should men be forced to have a beard

    There is a pretty thick line between encouraging and forcing!!! We tend to encourage beard and force hijab.
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Carlzone

    Should men be forced to have a beard

    It's good to point out wajibaat for both genders. Men should be encouraged to wear beards just like women should be encouraged to wear hijab. No difference.
  16. 1 point
    If these women already take it off like this then why do the laws in Iran need to change? Obviously they have enough freedom to get away with not covering all of their hair. The value might lie in those women who are in between. Those who are unsure whether to wear it or take it off. Conformity is well-known in human nature. Of course there are exceptions but most of the time people will do like the majority does. So it's better to have an Islamic environment to confirm to than a liberal mess. If the west can ban hijab and that's ok, why should Iran not be able to choose a more modest code of clothing? It doesn't even have to be related to religion. It could just be as simple as the fact that in this country (iran) modesty is valued much higher than other places in the world. And that should be just as fine as any other laws in any other country.
  17. 1 point
    aleena1904

    How to convince mother about hijab

    I don’t think wearing a hijab means you get less attention from guys. You can still be harassed by men regardless
  18. 1 point
    S.M.H.A.

    The Future of Muslims in the West

    That is all we are doing, reminding them and getting feedback as to who they see the Future of Muslims in the west. No one can force anyone to send their kids to Islamic schools or move their jobs and homes close to a Husaniyia/Mosque. what other options are there, if one does not do this ?
  19. 1 point
    dragonxx

    Do you believe that...?

    Well I remember reading somewhere that Allah does not try a person except that which that person is able to bear... so generally if that person decides to do wrong, they did it despite having the inner patience/strength to do otherwise.
  20. 1 point
    It's also important to differentiate between attraction and lust. Sure, men will still admire women who wear hijab, and some might even be attracted to them, but not in an inappropriate way. It's like when you talk to a business man who dresses all formal, you feel like being professional. Also look at this thread - created by @Abu Hadi
  21. 1 point
    Carlzone

    Racism

    This is horrible, unfortunately it doesn't seem as the Muslim community dares to touch upon these issues. Its easier to look the other way. Of course this is not islam, but people who claim to be Muslims engage in such practices. I don't think that this will change unless people dare to admit this in the community. And start doing aml bill maaroof and nahi an ilmonkar. I know an Arab woman. Her son wanted to marry a Pakistani girl. The mother said no because she was racist and said they are darkskinned. She also claimed that he needed her permission to marry. I told her that her son doesn't need her permission to marry and that she shouldn't care about the girl's nationality but rather focus on her religiousness. Do you think she was happy with my answer? She hated it and kept claiming that he does need her permission. I told her to ask a sheikh which she of course didn't want to. Anyway, do you know what happened? Her son married that girl anyway, and after a long process she accepted it and now even says that she likes the girl. And now her daughter has also married a Pakistani guy. She opposed it as well but her daughter insisted and married him anyway. I guess she will accept it with time.
  22. 1 point
    S.M.H.A.

    The Future of Muslims in the West

    Say, Ya Ali(as) یا علی 125. Amir al-mu'minin, peace be upon him, said: I am defining Islam as no one has defined before me: Islam is submission, submission is conviction, conviction is affirmation, affirmation is acknowledgement, acknowledgement is discharge (of obligations), and discharge of obligations is action. 125. وَ قَالَ عليه السلام: لَأَنْسُبَنَّ الْإِسْلَامَ نِسْبَةً لَمْ يَنْسُبْهَا أَحَدٌ قَبْلِى الْإِسْلَامُ هُوَ التَّسْلِيمُ وَ التَّسْلِيمُ هُوَ الْيَقِينُ وَ الْيَقِينُ هُوَ التَّصْدِيقُ وَ التَّصْدِيقُ هُوَ الْإِقْرَارُ وَ الْإِقْرَارُ هُوَ الْأَدَاءُ وَ الْأَدَاءُ هُوَ الْعَمَلُ . https://www.al-islam.org/nahjul-balagha-part-2-letters-and-sayings/selections-sayings-and-preaching-amir-al-muminin-ali#hadith-n-125
  23. 1 point
    Haji 2003

    Having a crush

    I'm sure I'd written about this before? The evening when I took her to see Julius Caesar, when I was 18, in Stratford-upon-Avon and where the A46 narrows to two lanes I tried to overtake, another car came in the opposite direction and I thought it was game over and she carried on with her explanation of Pakistan's nuclear programme. She was cool. Got through husbands at a rate of knots though.
  24. 1 point
    Salam ,the Hijab was compulsory for Zoroastrian women what shows from them without Hijab are imaginary drawings that inspired from presence of non Iranian or half Iranian women at that time before Islam if both parents were Iranian the woman must practice a very strict dress code even they didn't allow to talk other men except than her father & husband & during menstruation they didn't allow to leave their houses http://hijab.hayatebartar.ir/1802-از-اول-حجاب.html
  25. 1 point
    Very true. I fully agree with your reply. However I do need to join in. Inchallah other people with mood dissorders will pick-up on this thread.
  26. 1 point
    Ja'far as‑Sadiq (peace be upon him) said, "There is no compulsion (by Allah), nor is there absolute delegation of power (from Allah to man); but the real position is between these two extremes: al‑amr bayna 'l‑amrayn. Imam Musa al‑Kazim (peace be upon him) said, "A man acquires that ability when four condi­tions are fulfilled: 1. when there is nothing to hinder his plans; 2 his health and 3 the faculties (needed for that work) are up to the required standard; and 4 Allah provides him the occasion of that work. When all these conditions are fulfilled, a man becomes capable of acting according to his own free will." When asked for an example, the Imam said, "Let us suppose that there is a man, without any hindrance, of good health and proper strength; yet he cannot commit adultery unless he finds a woman. When he gets a woman (and the fourth condition is fulfilled), then it is up to him to choose one of the two alternatives: either he controls his evil emotions and saves himself as (Prophet) Yusuf did, or he commits adultery. If he protects himself from that sin, it will not be by compulsion of Allah (as some people think). And if he commits the sin, it does not mean that he was above the power of Allah (as others think)." 7 https://www.al-islam.org/justice-god-sayyid-saeed-akhtar-rizvi/compulsion-or-freedom#c-shiite-belief
  27. 1 point
    Carlzone

    The Future of Muslims in the West

    Great posts MashaAllah! And no, I don't expect any likes in return. I'm surprised no one is interested in discussing this, as this topic is about the future of the ummah. I believe the interest is lost when you ask people to make real sacrifices. Most people still want comfort and donya. The important question here is how do you reach deep down into their core belief system with values etc? How do you make them truly believe in the rewards Allah SWT has promised them? Because when they reach a high percentage of certainty in Allah SWTs promises then that sacrifice will be easy to make. But as long as donya is more believable than the rewards in akhira it will continue to be difficult to make a sacrifice. Unfortunately research has shown that after three generations differences between the original population and immigrants disappear and immigrants start living the same way as natives. So the odds are against us living in the West. But there are exceptions of course. So how do we address the core question successfully before we build up on it with all of the questions that you posted in this thread?
  28. 1 point
    Brother, the reason why Iran enforces it is because every sin is punishable by ta'zir. Every single sin, large or small. And also, nahi an al munkar.
  29. 1 point
    This makes sense if hijab is viewed solely as an individual act of religious observance. This dimension is more emphasized in non-Muslim countries, but in Muslim countries (especially ones observing Islamic structure as state policy), the social collectivist dimension is more important. In that case, hijab is mandated as part of law to uphold that structure. Personal convictions of individuals are independent variables in that equation, and the law never claims to directly address this matter. People are "forced to" pay taxes even if they don't personally believe the government is providing the right services. People are "forced to" wear clothes even if they prefer to be nude. People are "forced to" do many things they may not like or understand. Whether unofficially through social mores or officially through law. I touched upon this in a previous topic.
  30. 1 point
    shia_100

    Capital Punishment/Death Penalty

    Might be worthless justice to you but not for the family of the person who had been murdered
  31. 1 point
    Klanky

    Capital Punishment/Death Penalty

    What is achieved and what is lost by it? It's worthless justice
  32. 1 point
    so what? Let them, when they are home if they want to invite non mahram men they can take it off! But once they are out in public, Iranian law states that their hair is covered. We know the ones who don't care for hijab, already have 3/4 of their hair showing. So they are showing the men already what type of texture, color and thickness their hair looks like. Funny thing is those women who don't want hijab, and I'm talking about Muslim women here, when they pass away, again their hair will be covered. So it's better they choose to do it on their own because after death it is placed on them anyways! By golly, they are soooo oppressed. Cry me a river!
  33. 1 point
    Carlzone

    Fave cuisine

    Everyone, thank Allah SWT that we can choose amongst all of these luxurious foods as we wish while a large portion (no pun intended) of the world can't even get any food at all.
  34. 1 point
    Hameedeh

    Fave cuisine

    I think I have liked every post in this topic.
  35. 1 point
    Reza

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    People normally don't make phone calls with tablets. They may Skype or use video chats, but that just needs an internet connection.
  36. 1 point
    Sirius_Bright

    Why was I born a Shia?

    That is a well-known hadith: كُلُّ مَوْلُودٍ يُولَدُ عَلَى الفِطْرَةِ. Every child is born on the fitrah. These people have got the another chance in this world and many of them have found correct path (Reverts?). Those who are not Muslim and have done good deeds will be rewarded in this world because Allah is just.
  37. 1 point
    Carlzone

    Why was I born a Shia?

    A brother posted this in my thread on choosing to take the test of life. Maybe it's relevant here as well: https://archive.org/stream/alkafi_201601/Al-Kafi part 2#page/n15 In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful Part One The Book of Belief and Disbelief Chapter One (a) The Clay from Which the Believers and Unbelievers Are Made H 1438, CH 1a, h 1 Ali ibn Ibrahim has narrated from his father from Hammad ibn ‘Isa from Rib’i ibn ‘Abd Allah from a m an from Ali ibn al-Husayn, recipient of divine supreme covenant, who has said the following: “Allah, the Majestic, the Glorious, created the prophets from the clay of ‘Illiyiyyn (paradise), both their bodies and souls. He made the hearts of the believers from such clay and He made their bodies from a world lower than that world. He created the unbelievers, both their bodies and souls from the clay of Sijjin (fire). He thus mixed the two clays. For this reason children of unbelievers become believers and vice versa. For this reason the believers get afflicted with evil andunbelievers receive good things. Thus, the hearts of the believers incline to that from which they are created and the hearts of the unbelievers incline to that from which they are created.”
  38. 1 point
    Qa'im

    Why was I born a Shia?

    Technically every human is born on the fitra. Yes, the true Shi`a were already known in `alam al-dharr, but being born to Shi`a parents does not guarantee that you are a true Shi`a (or even a Muslim). There were Hashimis that became kufar, and there were Ummawis who became Shi`a.
  39. 1 point
    Carlzone

    FINAL ASSAD TOPIC: to prove my point

    "FINAL ASSAD TOPIC: To prove my point" QUESTION Has not the point been proven yet?
  40. 1 point
    notme

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    Mine can in the web browser. I'm pretty sure there's a YouTube app for standard Android tablets. Actually I haven't looked for a Kindle fire YouTube app. There might be one.
  41. 1 point
    Inconsolable

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    Other Tablet(Android). It depends on the person and what they will use it for, if they're not very tech savy then iPad would be suitable for them due to it's simplicity and low maintenance however it also has limitations such as not directly being able to download audio or videos file(you'd have to do it through an app or through your computer on itunes), no slot to add a memory card and extend the memory so you're limited with the built in memory among other things. Also androids are more prone to viruses/malware and over time often slow down as the OS creates a lot of junk/cache files and often applications keep running in the background without your knowledge and the average joe doesn't know how to turn such things off to have optimal performance while iOS(iPad's operating system) does not allow apps to do so among many other things.
  42. 1 point
    notme

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    iPad is overpriced. I enjoy using my inexpensive Kindle fire tablet. My only complaint is that my favorite documentary app doesn't work on my new one. I can still watch my science documentaries in the web browser, so it's a minor complaint. My former complaint was that it didn't have SD card storage, but the new one does.
  43. 1 point
    Reza

    Is Rape Allowed in Islam?

    What a stupid and ridiculous question to ask. Nevertheless, the question has been answered, and the Guest Forum is for quick answers, not long discussions. Closed.
  44. 1 point
    “Our master Imam al-Askari (peace be upon him) has also been reported to have said to Abu Hashim al-Ja’fari: “O Abu Hashim! There will come a time where people’s faces are laughing and joyous [while] their hearts are dark and indeterminate. The Sunnah amongst them is innovation and the innovation is Sunnah. The believer amongst them is demeaned and the evil one venerated. Their rulers are oppressive and their scholars through the doors of darkness proceed.Their wealthy pillage the provision of their poor. Their young precede their old, and every ignorant to them is an authority, and every assignee to them is poor. They do not differentiate between the sincere and the doubtful, nor do they know the sheep from wolves. Their scholars are the most evil of God’s creation on the face of earth, because they incline towards Philosophy and Sufism. By Allah! They are of the enemies and people of distortion. They exaggerate in their love for our opponents and they misguide our Shi’a and Followers.” (Safinatul Bihar, By al-Muhadith al-Qummi, vol. 2, p. 58)
  45. 0 points
    Hameedeh

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    Not kid, adult. Not work, just leisure, not sitting at the computer desk, preferably feet up, lol. Reading a book at al-islam.org or checking ShiaChat or watching youtube videos. The less the better. It's a gift, not an investment.
  46. 0 points
    Haji 2003

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    So papa how do you like the ipad we got for you?
  47. 0 points
    Hameedeh

    #39 iPad or Other Tablet?

    This shows how little I know about this subject. If you get an Ipad or another Tablet, do you have to pay extra to your cell phone company?
  48. 0 points
    ShiaMan14

    Do you own a Kafan?

    I bought mine from Karbala. The seller was funny. He was trying g to sell me the more expensive Kafan by say, "Dis one - very fast to jannah" . So I bought the more expensive one. Hehehe. That was about $15.
  49. 0 points
    When my mum was diagnosed with cancer, people would see us at mosque and give us a look that suggested we were like lost puppies in the rain lol. That always made me feel choked up and teary. I always tried my hardest to keep it in, I don't think I ever ended up crying in front of them.
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