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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/30/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    laithAlIRAQI

    Thoughts 2018

    Overslept almost an hour and had iftar an hour later than normal time. Maybe I should have rephrased it.
  2. 3 points
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    Sorry for derailing your thread. I think you should not complicate things futher and thus remove yourself from this man - if you have not already done so. I.e. break communication and don't be near him. There are Islamic laws to consider and your husband does have some moral rights over you. Once in isolation and away from the possibility of sin you should spend much time contemplating and purifying yourself spiritually. What to do after that in regards to your husband? I don't know, I am jahil but maybe Allah will guide you.
  3. 3 points
    ali_fatheroforphans

    Laylatul Qadr

    Salam, Laylatul Qadr is approaching and I hope everyone is as excited as I am. For the 100 Rakat prayer, can someone let me know how to perform this prayer properly? Iike what should my intention be? What Surahs should I recite? What time is it good to perform this prayer? Feel free to use this thread to ask questions about Laylatul Qadr!
  4. 3 points
    Aabiss_Shakari

    Iran ready to Sue USA

    Tehran wants to sue Washington for its indirect involvement in dual terrorist attacks in Iran last year, claiming that the president himself repeatedly admitted the US is responsible for the rise of the terrorist group. During his election campaign, US President Donald Trump repeatedly accused his predecessor’s administration – in particular, Democratic Party rival and former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton – of creating Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS). “Hillary Clinton created ISIS with Obama,” Trump told his supporters in January 2016. In a CBS 60 Minutes interview that aired July 17, 2016, he reiterated: “Hillary Clinton invented ISIS with her stupid policies.” Now Tehran is turning Trump’s rhetoric into a case against the US, blaming Washington for its alleged role in orchestrating terrorist attacks against the Iranian parliament and Ayatollah Khomeini’s shrine in Tehran in June 2017, for which IS claimed responsibility. “During the presidential campaign, Trump clearly spoke about the performance of his rival, Mrs. Clinton, saying that the US has created the ISIL,” Abolfazl Aboutorabi, a member of parliament’s judicial commission, said on Tuesday. Noting that a state leader’s word must be reliable enough to serve as proof in court, Aboutorabi announced that parliament has decided to initiate a lawsuit against Washington in the “international” court. “The public prosecutor has also filed a lawsuit in this regard,” Aboutorabi added, according to FARS News Agency. At least 17 people died and dozens were injured in gun and bomb attacks at the Iranian parliament and Ayatollah Khomeini’s shrine in Tehran on June 7, 2017. According to the Iranian Intelligence Ministry, the five attackers who were neutralized by security forces were Iranian citizens who joined IS before returning to Iran in summer 2016. Iran’s Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) accused Saudi Arabia of masterminding the attacks, saying that the assaults “happened only a week after the meeting between the US president [Donald Trump] and the [Saudi] backward leaders who support terrorists.” While Washington sent condolences over the tragedy, Tehran rejected those “claims of friendship.” The Islamic Republic’s idea to take the US to court for “creating” IS comes less than a month after a federal judge in New York found Iran liable for the deaths of more than 1,000 people in the September 11 attacks and ordered Tehran to pay more than $6 billion in damages. Iran rejected Judge George Daniels’ default ruling, accusing the US judicial system of attempts to “rewrite history.” In its response, the foreign ministry reiterated that Iran had nothing to do with organizing or financing the 9/11 attacks. Previously, Judge Daniels issued default judgments against Iran, in 2011 and 2016, ordering the Islamic Republic to pay billions of dollars to victims of the attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 people. https://www.rt.com/news/428179-iran-court-us-isis/
  5. 3 points
    hasanhh

    Thoughts 2018

    Today, l did the reverse. l forgot Fajr is getting earlier so when l realized my timing error, l raced to cook and then only had time to eat about a fourth or third of it. So, leftovers for iftar. Thought: though l have already read Quran for Ramadham, l will read again, inshallah.
  6. 3 points
    realizm

    Coca Cola Ramadhan Ad

    I still hate it. Muslims had the best soft drinks - jellab, khak-e-shir and so on - yet they gave them up for those poisons. What curse fell upon us so we even pollute our holiest occasions with corrupt products ?
  7. 3 points
    IbnSina

    Coca Cola Ramadhan Ad

    They think the month of Ramadan is like xmas and that you can turn it into some kind of money making machine for their trash products. Jokes on them, they do not know that the month of Ramadan is against consumerism and the shallow life style that goes with it.
  8. 2 points
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    You are going too far. He never said that. Precision is important. Be precise with your argumentation. One of the reasons I made my initial comment was to make the OP realise that there is a long way for us to go before we reach our goal. If we claim to love Allah with all our heart then we don't really know how lowly we are. In this case we have to improve our intellectual and spiritual state and hopefully then there will be less confusion in our mind. This message is for me first, even before the OP.
  9. 2 points
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    I was waiting for Ron to respond before explaining what I meant. I thought more people would understand what I meant. But since this thread is going off-topic and I don't want it to be derailed further, I will explain it right now. My claim is that none but an infallible can "love Allah with all my heart and soul". You will never hear a great scholar, abid or arif uttering those words. If they did then either they were infallible or not speaking the truth. To quote Shaheed al-Sadr: Read the context to understand this better: http://www.aimislam.com/speech-on-the-love-of-Allah-by-shaheed-al-sadr/ On top of that, even if we were capabale of loving "Allah with all my heart and soul", we would still not be loving Allah to the extent that he deserves to be loved. We are limited beings and we must be careful of saying such words.
  10. 2 points
    Abu Nur

    Religiously confused

    I don't think he is judgmental, he is more realistic. It is a heavy claim. If someone is truly such in love in Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى, you will not find such a person falling in love with non-muslim.
  11. 2 points
    Ron_Burgundy

    Religiously confused

    How could you be so damn judgemental? Stop Judging people. She might have made some mistakes in her life but she could have done 1 thing which could be superior to all of our ibadats. Judging is for Allah not for us. So let Allah judge her.
  12. 2 points
    Akbar673

    Religiously confused

    What was the reason for having a Nikah done 2 years ago? Immigration? What happened during your travels that caused you to have this change of heart? How much time has passed since you spoke with him? You do understand that a Nikah is a marriage and that you are a Married woman, right? Falling in love with a man that is not your husband is essentially what you have done. I can imagine. You are a married woman with a husband. Guilt is probably eating away at you. Well, here's my advice. Islamically in the eyes of Allah you have married already, forget about this non-Muslim you are in love and return to your husband. If you can not bring yourself to staying married to him then you need to ask for a divorce. Not sure how you are going to have that conversation because you're not on strong footing since you essentially cheated on him and fell in love with another man. I'm not sure what the basis of your Nikah to him was but regardless a Nikah is a valid contract of marriage. I'm not even going to get into the complications when you will be filing for a legal divorce in the courts of wherever you live because your husband has the strongest of cases against you.
  13. 2 points
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    No you don't. I don't, and probably no one on this forum does. BTW thank you for posting this thread, people (including you and others) could learn from it.
  14. 2 points
    Ron_Burgundy

    Religiously confused

    Very well said. I could tell she is not happy because she is regrating. Somewhere in her heart, she knows she is not doing right. It is not right with her husband. I feel bad for him.
  15. 2 points
    Biradar, you created a topic with title saying What is needed to unite the Ummah?. That itself states lots of things. And then you start pushing verse after verse so what should I understand?. Yes, it there was no apparent divisions in those years but it happened later. Believe me, it is impossible to understand the Quran without Ahlulbait (ams) and their teachings. The Quranic verses are all reliable but you cannot understand without Ahadith. Btw, I only stated two hadith on that verse and there are many more similar narrating from different ma'soom and different chains. Ever heard of tawatur? Okay. So, if you have read the post properly the translation of that verse [6:159] was correct ([3:7] was incorrect) but Imam (a.s.) had read that verse as 'Left' instead of 'split' or other mentioned meanings. Remember Aimma (ams) >>>.. All those translators combined. Thanks. Do read tafsir of that verse.
  16. 2 points
    forte

    Why homosexuality isn't great

    Dont know about great or not so great. Probably a lot easier to be heterosexual though. Homosexuality is not a disability but an abnormality; that is, it is a sexual attraction that differs from the norm. The norm is being heterosexual. Anyone with an abnormality needs to develop life coping strategies to operate within the "normal" population. This has led to some interesting strategies....they are many and varied. The laws and social stigma against homosexuality have embraced some extremely punitive and often violent actions being taken against this population in direct contravention of basic human rights. If we value human rights for ourselves, we have to promote human rights for all peoples including those with abnormalities, disorders and disablitiies. The fight to re-criminalize or maintain the illegality of homosexuality vs the fight to legitimize it both legally and socially has led to the politicization of this abnormality and to some very extreme actions on both ends of the spectrum. The positive of this fight is that it has created a freedom for homosexuals to lead a less clandestine life with more support, acceptance and medical intervention. It has also perhaps has prevented some deaths from suicidal depression. The negative is that the outcome of this fight has impaired freedom of thought and speech. Expressing negative views on homosexuality can have you be charged with "homophobia", hate speech, etc with punishments ranging from having a criminal record to being shunned, losing your job, etc. I have never seen any literary evidence that proves homosexuality to be harmful. The species survives despite homosexuality. There is a lot of research to show that homosexuals are products of nature, not nurture so would not be an affliction to the general population other than that of possible discomfort. Sexually intimate behaviour from people of all sexual orientations in public is socially and sometimes legally unacceptable. I think that schools should teach about all abnormalities. Accurate information from a carefully developed educational curriculum source is better than ill informed or biased information. I dont think it is health for primary students to be exposed to this (as is the push), but this information should be accessible to children before they learn it elsewhere. Conversations about gays often includes overlapping talk of pedophilia. Pedophilia is a psychiatric disorder where someone is exclusively attracted to children; the children are usually defined as being under the age of 13. There are gays who are pedophiles. However, the perpetrators of pedophilia are mainly male, and the targets of pedophiles are mainly female.
  17. 2 points
    Any sort of kissing in public is not acceptable, given we're in an Islamic state. I am equally against a man and woman kissing in public, compared to gay people kissing. There is no concept of decriminalization in an ideal Islamic state.
  18. 2 points
    Ashvazdanghe

    Laylatul Qadr

    in the name of God If a man has reached the highest levels and has corrected himself, understanding the night of magnitude is easy for him, because a night with such greatness and sincerity must have signs. A Pilgrim who has goes from Rajab to the month of Ramadan and prepared himself can find these signs ,is it not possible Yusuf Zahraaaa (peace be upon him) sends the shirt to the eyes of Jacob (peace be upon him). Here are some of these tags: 1. Mohammad bin Moslem from one of two Imams Baqir and Sadiq (as) asked about the sign of the Night of the Great: The sign of the night is that the smell of pleasure is spreading. If the night falls in the cold (winter), it will be warm and gentle if it is in the heat (summer). becomes cool , mild temperate and good. Kafi, v4, p. 157; The commentary of Nur al-Qa'alīn, v. 5, p. 622;Faqih, v. 2, p. 102 2. The stars of that night are shining like the sun Iqbal al-A'alam, p. 65; commentary on al-Mizan follows the interpretation of Surah al-Ghadr 3. In the morning of that night, the sun rains without a radius and the weather is mild. 4. That night, the hands of the devil and the wizards are closed. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH & HP) said: Satan does not come out this night until rais in the morning and can not bring madness, illness or any harm to anyone. Also, no magic will strike this night Interpretation of Noor Al-Thaqalain lin, vol. 5, p. 615, narrative 15 5. Ibn Abbas says Prophet Muhammad (PBUH & HP) said: At night, the Angles of the Cedrat' al-Munthaha and Gabriel descend to the ground with flags, installing one of the flags on my grave, and installing the rest in the mosque of Al-Haram and Jerusalem and Sinai. They will not pass through any believer unless they are saluted to them, non-people who have eaten wine or pig meat. That night is a very blessed night. The predestinations and destiny of all human beings will be revealed on that day on the Imam of the time of the glorification of and the night of Qadr will remain until the Day of Resurrection. Comprehensive Jamih, vol. 7, p. 452 6. Animals do something unusual at this night, such as a dog not does barking, does not bite anyone on this night. Iqbal al-A'alam, p. 64 7. Amid bin Umar says: At the end of Ramadan, I traveled with the ship on a night of nights and took the sea water and drank it, and found it delusional. So I knew that night is Qadr Hujatul-Tafasir, vol. 7, p. 277 8. The interpreter of Hujjaltul Tafasir says: I found the night of Qadr in the third decade of Ramadan twice. When I visited Abdu'l-Azim Hasani (as), I found myself some of the signs, especially since I did not hear the dog's voice that night, and there were no other nonsense. Peace and tranquility was on all the creatures, even on the leaves of the trees. http://www.mahdialomam.ir/article/نشانه-های-شب-قدر http://ahlolbait.com/doa/12092/نشانه-های-شب-قدر-از-دیدگاه-روایات-اقبال-الاعمال
  19. 2 points
    usually the first Istikhara is best of them & you can pay alms or do charity for what comes not to do it because maybe you face some problems when you do it.
  20. 2 points
    To act according to akhlaq of Prophet (pbuh) and Imams (as). Those who reject us, we don't need to unite with them, and we can simply ignore them. Abu Jahl, abu Lahab, and others can't reject the Prophet due to his akhlaq even though they rejected Islam.
  21. 2 points
    Hameedeh

    EU & "Festival" Slaughters

    Salam. The EU wants to regulate that Muslims can slaughter in "approved slaughterhouses" probably because Muslims tend to slaughter anywhere they want, without meat inspectors. A neighbor does not want to look out his/her window and see a Muslim slaughtering an animal in his back yard.
  22. 2 points
    Aquib Rizvi

    Laylatul Qadr

    Wa aleykumsalaam, What we normally do in our local mosque is that we pray 100 rakah by praying Qadha-e-Umri of 6 Days eg ( 2 Rakah - Fajr, 4 Rakah zuhar and Asr, 3 Rakah for Majhrib and 4 Rakah for Isha = 6 days x 17 = 102 Rakah) and followed by Amaal of Shabe Qadr, What is mention in the hadeeth is total different of what we do, here is what our Imam recommend us to pray on 21st and 23rd of the month of Ramadhan. Ghusl is recommended to do on Laylatul Qadr
  23. 1 point
    HumanForLife

    Artificial Intelligence

    http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html Scary.
  24. 1 point
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    He never said "you don't love Allah". He said: "If someone is truly such in love in Allah" and "how can someone love Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى so much". There is a difference between what you think he said and what he actually said.
  25. 1 point
    Abu Nur

    Religiously confused

    It is simple really, how can someone love Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى so much and fall in love in non-muslim? So do you think people love Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى while obey Shaytan many times? That is an illusion.
  26. 1 point
    Salam everyone, I am trying to brainstorm some ideas that I could get for my 2 teenage nephews for eid (15 and 13). I would like it to be something 'fun' or interesting for them, but something that would hopefully encourage them in Islam or expand their knowledge of Islam. I tried to look up if there are any positive young adult novels featuring muslim male protagonists, but I couldn't find any. Plus I don't know if they would be interested in reading a novel anyway. Does anyone have any other ideas or suggestions? Is there some Islamic video game I could buy them?
  27. 1 point
    Muhammed Ali

    Religiously confused

    Is she infallible?
  28. 1 point
    Stop spreading lies about other sects.
  29. 1 point
    Abdul Basit all the way.
  30. 1 point
    Salam. I'm sorry that nobody replied to you. Yes, I.M.A.M. is a reputable organization and I have known about them for 14 years. I'm not sure how many years they are in existance. You can trust to give your money (sadaqah, zakat, fidyah, khums, kaffarah, nather, charity, dues, etc.) by giving your personal information and method of payment. https://www.imam-us.org/charity-dues/
  31. 1 point
    The Shia-Sunni Debate: Answering the 50 Most Common Questions Get PDF https://www.al-islam.org/shia-sunni-debate-answering-50-most-common-questions-dr-liakat-dewji-baqerali-alidina
  32. 1 point
    I had a test, flicked the page, saw the question sheet, started laughing at how wrecked I was gonna get. Not worth much, but damn the test was hard.
  33. 1 point
    In that case, you got two likes.
  34. 1 point
    Ashvazdanghe

    Thoughts 2018

    I had 2 hour & half oversleeping what it can be named.
  35. 1 point
    Marzii

    Holy Qur'an surah 33 verse72

    Thank you everyone..for your response.. Salam alaikum
  36. 1 point
    abuhaydar

    Can I convert into Shia??

    ISIS follow the Quran too dont they? It is not enought to only follow the Quran, the wahhabis are best at reading and reciting Quran... yet they dont understand a word they are reading
  37. 1 point
    forte

    Them darn immigrants saving our children

    Here is a fairly recent poll https://www.thelocal.se/20160905/poll-fewer-swedes-willing-to-help-asylum-seekers According to this, Swedes want fewer asylum seekers but are not advocating for no immigration. Yes, a substantial number of people require social assistance for daily living, special medical care and special educational services and it is very expensive. But the majority of Swedes still vote for leadership who advocate for immigration and advertising their country as a haven for asylum seekers. Concerns: Out of the 10,000,000 who are actually tax contributing? Not sure what numbers are the working population once you account for children, seniors and those of working age who are not contributing. There is a rise in the right due to a chronic strain on resources - costs continue to rise. The right currently has favour of 20% in polls... but actual votes may be different.
  38. 1 point
    ^ I mean "You can read the translation along with the Arabic recitation.
  39. 1 point
    Hehe im a guy
  40. 1 point
    Salaam Alaykum I checked Ayatollah Bahjat, Khamenei, Makaram Shirazy, Sistani, Fazel, Safi, Noury, Tabrizy and Vahid. All said the time to do Iftar is Maghrib time. Maghrib time is a time that sun is hidden in horizon and the sky redness is removed from the sky(when you stand outside, if you look above your head, you won't see the redness) Maghrib is different than Ghroub. Maghrib happens 15-20 mins after Ghroub. This time is pray time, so you must wait till after Azan. Shiite time is correct.
  41. 1 point
    ali_fatheroforphans

    What made you laugh today

    My bank balance
  42. 1 point
    IbnSina

    SERlOUSLY . . . Sick of :

    Alhamdulillah that its possible to wear hijab AND act appropriate as well. Here is my new input for this thread: I'm sick of people who use others disobedience towards Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى to justify their own disobedience towards Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى.
  43. 1 point
    Thanks I have learned everything about Shia through you tube channel Nd with help of my friend Nd started doing namaz Nd wudu according to Shia from last 6 months . But recently one of my uncle said me that Shia ppl won't accept me . Because my name is ayesha but really I love ahlulbayt I want to be a Shia
  44. 1 point
    realizm

    Who is your Favorite Quran Reciter?

    It is incredible indeed, even better than Abdel Bassit's recitation if you ask me. I love how he gives different pronounciations for a single word in a single breath. (This is surat ul takwir btw).
  45. 1 point
    Maybe he does have a compilation, you should ask him. I have just never seen or looked for one by him.
  46. 1 point
    Not taking sides, your argument is rather terrible. Sadiq Shirazi lives in London; even if the Iranian government wanted to arrest him, they wouldn't be able to. So...their lack of action in that regard proves neither this nor that.
  47. 1 point
    its not a fitna when the other side is supporting your enemy... i could care less if they joined or not with that level of bassiraa. its quality not quantity.. wf and hizbullah have kept shiism alive in the middle east and continue to do so, while others harumph with their arms folded calling them satan.. just because they didnt get to wear the captain's hat.. Im not here to win a popularity contest... to hell with anyone that calls my family of martyrs the party of satan for defending shiism.
  48. 1 point
    Alhamdulillah we have the truth, there is no need for insulting or fitna mongering, these are all desperate measures. If you truly believe you have the truth and you really care about your brothers then approach them with care not with anger, who is going to listen to you when you start by insulting their mother?
  49. 1 point
    Based on my extremely limited induction, an average Shi'a youth in the West (though this is definitely not limited to the West) is going through a lot of epistemic challenges in their life. Living in an area and in an era where perceptions of morality seem to have changed, dealing with laws that often times seem irrelevant, dealing with laws that often times seem unethical, encountering theological and philosophical challenges whose responses may not fit well within a Western epistemic framework that has naturally been shoved down their minds, and trying to reconcile all these feelings and perceptions with a version of religion that was taught to them by parents who immigrated from the East, and was constantly spread from the pulpits by scholars who also came from the East. Couple this with the geographical distance from the center of scholarship, and lack of access to scholars, many of them who are perhaps addressing these issues - all of this becomes a recipe for an epistemological crisis. We can count the highly qualified Shi'i scholars - those who are really experts in their given field - in the West on two hands. The rest of the vast majority of scholars are followers themselves, but with a bit more grasp on the subject matter than laymen. This is not always their fault - maybe many of them did initially come to the seminary to reach that level; but it was the fault of the system that doesn't seem to have any intentions of producing legitimate scholars out of foreign students nor does it have a suitable syllabus for Western students. So you have at many times mediocre scholars at best, trying to address some very complicated issues, but in reality have not truly understood the challenge or the response themselves. One of the greatest challenge that Islamic scholarship is still dealing with is modernity. For a thousand years, the derivation of Islamic law was based on the premise that we had empires and civilizations. Where religion was a sign of your citizenship, not your ethnicity. The average age for a border in the Islamic world is the 19th-20th century - see this really interesting infographic (https://www.reddit.com/r/dataisbeautiful/comments/7ne62v/the_date_of_origin_for_almost_every_international/) This is around the same time when so-called reformist voices (as we understand them today) within the Islamic world also started speaking up. With the demise of dynasties and the caliphate - where religion had relevancy over ethnicity and nationality, and a lot of laws were derived based on this presumption - now you were dealing with the concept of a modern nation state. A state where religion was secondary, and ethnicity or culture were fundamental. When once it made sense for 'Allamah Majlisi to come and say that non-Muslims should not be allowed to leave their homes on rainy and snowy days in Safavid Iran since they will make everything and every Muslim they come into contact with najis, because the dhimmis were rightfully treated as secondary citizens (perhaps in modern terms, one can say they had a green-card, but without all the benefits of a citizen) - stops making sense since your religion doesn't dictate whether you are a citizen or not any longer (even in Iran). When once apostasy from religion made complete sense as treason, stops making sense in the modern world since religion isn't relevant - allegiance and treason with respect to the state became relevant. When once wars were fought between religions, many subsequent laws made sense, but as wars slowly stopped being fought between religions, and rather between states & nationalities, a lot of subsequent laws went out the window. Please note I am of course talking in general terms, otherwise you will find instances where what I have written above is not absolutely true (post or pre-20th century). In any case, the challenge at this point was, what do we do? There is an intense debate amongst scholars on what to do here - sometimes one side labeling the other as sell-outs, while one labels the other as backward minded. You have two camps of scholars here: those who maintain that traditional laws and traditional interpretations should continue to be implemented the way they had been for a hundreds of years, and then you have those who argue that the subject-matter of many of these laws has changed in our day to day reality and thus some of these laws have truly become irrelevant. Not because the law itself had an issue, but rather the conditions under which it was implemented no longer exist. What I have seen is that those who maintain the first position end up with contradictions in some of their laws, and this is inevitable - because you really cannot deny that the world we are dealing with has changed. The second camp is often accused for justifying and being complicit in their support for the incorrect premises of modernity and secularism, by passing verdicts that makes living comfortable and adjustable in modern societies. Of course, the second side also ends up slipping into territory without realizing the full implications of it (for example, as you have mentioned in your original post, is Sayyid Kamal not aware of the agenda of extremist feminists and the implications of some of their ideas? Maybe he truly isn't, since he has not lived in such a society. Perhaps if he lived in a Scandinavian country he would be witness to the detrimental effects of some of these ideas). Nevertheless, the latter category can argue that their laws are not necessarily because they theoretically accept secularism or consider the premises of modernity to be ideal, and rather, the two are not necessarily mutually inclusive. In other words, one can give a verdict in accordance to the current context of the world, while still maintaining that the current situation of the world is not ideal. As I mentioned above, there is an immense debate on this topic, and both sides have strong arguments that cannot be taken for granted. Also, with respect to the second group, I am not including those scholars who are confirmed sell-outs, but rather legitimate scholars who have posed arguments that are worth looking into. For example, as far as I am concerned, Sayyid Kamal falls into the second group (there are many others though). Let me give you another example. Why is it that we take a three-fold division to religious propositions for granted (theology, jurisprudence, and ethics)? What I mean by this is, what is the difference between jurisprudence (fiqh) and ethics (akhlaq)? Don't both ethics and jurisprudence tell us to "do" or "not do" something - in which case shouldn't it all fall under one of the categories (you can call it fiqh or akhlaq, doesn't matter)? Why is it that we have things that are permissible legally speaking, but are so detested ethically by societies and individuals that they are essentially treated as haram? Is our fiqh unethical? Do we find God, Prophet or the Imams emphasizing this difference in the religious texts - in the Qur'an or Hadith? Isn't the end goal of both fiqhi and akhlaqi propositions the same? Do we not have narrations saying, if one doesn't possess a certain ethical trait, or manifests a certain immoral trait, they will be destroyed or be punished in the hereafter. How is this different than the reports that talk about being punished if one does a haram act? Why can't this division - that is so ingrained in the minds of Muslim - be questioned and looked into? Some research has shown that this division was a natural consequence of the development of Sunni jurisprudence during the Umayyad and 'Abbasid dynasty - where ethical propositions and jurisprudential propositions became distanced for one reason or another. Given how much of our structure for Usuli and Fiqhi discussions was adopted from the Ahl al-Sunnah, it appears this division was one of those things we naturally adopted and continued to stick with it for hundreds of years. Today many scholars (many of them are also from that first camp I defined above) are realizing that this division was a big blunder. Once again, the discussion on this is extremely detailed and complicated - I am simply citing it here so that brothers and sisters are not so quick to attack scholars from different camps, and realize the strength of some of the arguments made by scholars who they may not agree with. Strength does not mean the argument is without flaw, but rather it possess enough merit for one to seriously consider it and look into it further. As for your actual inquiry, regarding how to follow different opinions held by credible scholars - this is something some of the Western students in the seminary do often discuss a lot. What do we present to the people back home? People are at different levels of understanding, and it is difficult to give a unified response to all of them. For example, someone like @silasun who is actually pondering over this matter (because many may not even be bothered by this question), they need to look more into religious epistemology and the philosophy and epistemic value of taqlid in human life. There are books written on this subject, but unfortunately nothing in English that I know of. Becoming acquainted with something like this puts a lot of things and a lot of beliefs a person has into perspectives. Most importantly, it helps become less dogmatic. A friend of mine is shortly starting a blog that will be very related to the inquiry @silasun has - InshAllah I will share the link here once he posts up some entries. Wasalam
  50. 1 point
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