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In the Name of God بسم الله

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  1. Wa aleykum Salam You have a track record of being racist and rude. Praising hitler on this site is not accepted, whether you like it or not. Neither is promoting killing of jews or christians. Take that trash elsewhere. The member you are calling Zionist, i recon you mean David66, is actually one of the most polite members we have, something you should learn from as a shia. You might not agree with him or other members, and he might be a zionist, but he is not breaking forum rules and he is behaving, which is more than i can say about you, specially when you call yourself a Shia. Making a post like this will only make you look silly and pathetic in order to get a bandwagon going. How about spending your time learning how to post your opinion in a proper academic fashion, that way we can all learn from your supposed knowledge and others can engage with you without having you ranting. Once you are able to do that, you are welcome back. Wasalam
    6 points
  2. You'll find them in Sunni Fiqh and hadith literature. And this is no lie.
    5 points
  3. I think this is an important question in Christian/Shi'a Muslim relations Many Sunnis are invested in the memory of the Crusades and it is often thought that the Crusades were a kind of barbarian incursion against the civilized and pluralist Muslim world. But while the first Crusaders were known for their particularly savage character, the events that lead up to the first Crusade could also be seen as Muslim aggression. It's no secret the Seljuk Turks, newly converted to Islam, had pressed against the Eastern Roman Empire, reducing its territory more than half by the end of the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, some twenty years before Pope Urban II, in response to a plea for help against the Seljuks on the basis of Christian unity by Emperor Alexios Komnenos I, would then rally the knights and people of Christian Europe for a holy pilgrimage to reclaim Jerusalem. There is also the sacking of the church of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia in Northern Spain by al-Manzor in the year 997, a battle which ended in al-Manzor and his armies looting the cathedral of St.James the Apostle, one of Catholic Europe's most popular shrines, and taking its bells back to Cordoba. There was also the unstable situation in Jerusalem itself caused by the battles between the Fatimids and the Seljuks (the Seljuks probably caused as much frustration for the Ismaili Fatimids as they did for the Greeks). One reason for the call to reclaim Jerusalem for Christendom in the rhetoric of the Catholic Church was the abuse of pilgrims on route to Palestine, a problem that became exacerbated by the tug of war with the Seljuks and the weakening of the Fatimids' hold on the region. According to Ibn Al-Athir (d. 1233), some people blamed the Fatimid dynasty for the Crusader incursion, believing that the Fatimids, in their anger at the conquests of the Seljuks of their former territories as well as their incursion into Egypt itself, collaborated with the Franks in order to invade Syria. Of course we know that this stems mostly from sectarian hostility, the Fatimids did try to sue for peace with the Crusaders upon their sieges of Seljuk territory, an effort that proved to be in vain. But after the conquest (or should I say slaughter) of Jerusalem, some Islamic travelers after the first Crusade lamented the fact that many Muslims felt safer under Frankish rule than they did under the rivaling sultanates since the Franks had no stakes in the political squabbles of Muslims except where they could use them to their advantage. To get to my main point, while much has been discussed or written regarding the Crusades, Muslim views on the Crusades or Muslim-Christian interaction before, during and after the Crusades, very little has ever been mentioned regarding the situation specifically of Shi'a and their relationship to the greater conflicts of this time, except for perhaps the Nizari Assassins of Alamut (whose on again, off again relationship with the Templar Knights is the subject of much popular speculation and fiction). It appears to me that Shi'a, whether Ismaili, Zaydi or Ithna Ashari had little to do with the conflicts of this time period, being mostly assaulted either by both sides or attempting to align themselves with whatever side seemed most favorable at the time, regardless of religious affiliation, or even having no real involvement at all except as bystanders watching a conflict unfold between two groups who may have had no regard for them or may have seen them as a wild card. Perhaps then an exploration of Shi'a viewpoints and experiences of the Crusades could reveal a reality that goes beyond the usual rhetoric thrown back and forth between Middle Eastern and Western scholars.
    4 points
  4. notme

    Incense Making Me High :)

    Either is isn't just incense, or you are breathing too much of it and need air. Please, for your own health and safety, open a window.
    4 points
  5. Please read: http://litreactor.com/columns/10-words-you-literally-didnt-know-you-were-getting-wrong -_-
    4 points
  6. I feel for you. I'm Lebanese (born and raised in Australia) and my husband is Afghan (born there and raised here) and I had people literally try to talk me out of it and giving me "advice". We're both Shia, but the fact that he was Afghan drove them nuts. My grandfather said he'd rather me marry someone from a different sect than a different culture. Complete strangers that found out post marriage would look almost revolted and literally say "Why?". One man I spoke to on the bus seemed insulted lol. I just laughed it off all the time and said it's God's will and fear of God is what matters :P This quote became quite useful to me: (bismillah) People, We have created you all male and female and have made you nations and tribes so that you would recognize (know) each other. The most honorable among you in the sight of God is the most pious of you. God is All-knowing and All-aware. Surah al-Hujurat (49:13)
    4 points
  7. Salam brother, I don't know what you guys use in the UK, but here in Australia we simply use the term "talking". Example: "Are you engaged to him?" Reply would be "No, we're talking". A gift is a must in my opinion, it shows good manners and etiquette. Some fresh sweets from a nearby pastry shop, or a nice box of chocolates. Also, if you do decide to see her more than once, consider bringing a gift now and then, not just the first time. My husband continued buying sweets when he came, then he found out I liked gelato, so he actually started buying me that. Later on down the road that is. Also, if there is potential, be political and buy the mother flowers later down the track (a few weeks in). If the mother is happy with you, it makes the process so much easier -_- When I told my father that a guy wanted to speak with me in regards to compatibility, my husband actually said that he'll bring his parents and my father said that there was no need to. So he came alone for a while and when we decided on engagement (the actual 'Aqd) his parents came. However, depending on the culture and mentality of your potential in laws, this is a tricky part. They might ask your parents come the first time and then other times alone, or do what my dad did. Your best shot is actually asking the girl if you should or not. If they practice the same culture as you do, then ask your parents.
    3 points
  8. World's Biggest Pilgrimage Now Underway, And Why You've Never Heard of it! | Sayed Mahdi al-Modarresi http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/sayed-mahdi-almodarresi/arbaeen-pilgrimage_b_6203756.html
    2 points
  9. Salam, I recently found this site with many of the Speeches of Imam Khomeni(ra), Imam Khameni(ha), Shaheed Muhammad Baqr Sadr(ra), and Sayyid Hassan Nasrallah with English subs. the site is http://islamicideology.net/
    2 points
  10. notme

    Marriage Because Of Sex

    1. It is part of our lower nature. 2. Media and non-Muslims put way too much emphasis on sexuality, so there is a backlash. You can have marriage without lust, but it is likely to be unsatisfying. There are other qualities that you just can't have a marriage without, such as trust, respect, compassion, integrity.
    2 points
  11. Brother, look at what they do in their culture. If you follow the advise of people who are not familiar with the culture, then you could get things very wrong in the eyes of the family. Some of the advise given above may be completely unsuitable in certain cultures.
    2 points
  12. (bismillah) سلام There are several issues here, my friend. I never claimed this or that method was stricter, and strictness shouldn't even be the goal. It smells of being overly technical with a sociological, man made science. Also, coming in with an outlook with "strictness" would reveal several things about the one approaching our literature. It means that one is approaching the books with suspicion rather than trust in the actual scholars of hadith themselves, such al-Kulayni, al-Saduq, and even those that preceded them like Ashab al-Ijma` رحمهم الله جميعا Also, there is also the issue that one is limiting one's self to thinking that the Qudama - and let's not forget the Aqdimeen - do not have opinions outside of what is written in the rijal books or that we need to have written text from them (riwayah) to know their relying upon a narrator, rather than looking at their actions in revealing their i`itmad (dirayah). This is also without understanding the mabani and biases these scholars had in making these rijali decisions. Also, I can think of two off the top of my head who are given "praise" by Qudama that I do not accept: يحيى بن سعيد القطان and محمد بن المثنى الحضرمي Edit: I would also like to add in that this is all assuming that we must, essentially, do pure taqlid to the Qudama in their decisions. This is also a point of discussion (محل كلام) I will not get into, rather I think we should all read more. No methodology accepts all narration, and if you think this is what the scholars who use qara'in do, I urge you to read more, ponder, and expand your horizons. One should expect many or most ahadeeth to be mu`tabar in the books that Qudama gave tasheeh. Also, hadith does not mean isnad, necessarily. في أمان الله
    2 points
  13. Dress to impress, but maintain your own style. For example, if you usually wear khakis and a buttoned shirt, keep the same style, but choose your nicest looking and be sure it is neatly ironed. If you usually dress like a slob, dress like a job interview instead of following my first advice.
    2 points
  14. Salams yep, Fatima's post was very good. That hits the nail on the head. The term if in fact called "talking" here in the UK too. It just implies that you getting to know someone for the purpose of marriage but no decision has been reached yet. Wasalam
    2 points
  15. classical shia sources spoke little on the 7th century conquests because Ahlul Bayt and their Shi'a had little involvement with those conflicts. But whether or not Jerusalem is part of dar al-Islam is not necessarily important as Jerusalem can still be controlled by non-Muslims and yet be dar al-Iman. That's why a uniquely Shi'a evaluation of the conflicts of the Crusades is useful, since it offers a different perspective. For the Shi'a of this time period, generally speaking, there was no special attachment to this idea of Muslim unity. If the Franks were willing to provide protection and haven to Shi'a from their Muslim enemies, the Shi'a, namely the Ithna Asharis wouldn't think twice about running to live under them. Like I said, the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, after the dust settled from the First Crusade, were quite tolerant of their Muslim subjects in most cases. I wouldn't be too surprised if some of those living in Jerusalem at this time had links to Shi'a groups who were otherwise eyed with suspicion or enmity in the neighboring Seljuk Sultanates. One thing that needs to be borne in mind by Shi'a who wish to study the Crusades is that the division of the world into either Dar al-Harb and Dar al-Islam is largely a Sunni juristic invention. Shi'a in contrast understood the world as "hostile to Shi'a" and "not hostile to Shi'a," and the latter didn't necessarily include Sunni kingdoms and could, theoretically based on Shi'a narrations from the Imams, include Christian, Jewish or pagan rulers who were willing to provide safe haven and religious liberty for Shi'a from their most immediate enemies. For Medieval Shi'a, particularly Ithna Asharites, there wasn't always this sense of Islamic unity we strive for today. For many of them, Sunni rulers were often just as undesirable as Christian ones and Sunni rulers saw Shi'a of any sect as either a political threat or as a nuisance they reluctantly had to tolerate, lest they cause instability. It would be an error to think that Sunnis or Shi'a during this time necessarily identified with each other or must have held lofty ideas of "we're both Muslims and should unite against the kafir." This I think is extremely important to remember. As far as we know, Saladin had no seriously bad reputation among the Ithna Asharites during his own lifetime. In fact, most of Saladin's harshest critics were in fact Sunni historians such as Ibn al-Athir and al-Maqrizi, while the Shi'a historian Ibn Abi Tayy, who lived in Aleppo and despised the Nizari Assassins, praised Saladin and he wasn't the only Shi'a of the time to do so while at the same time he expressed hatred for Saladin's master Nur ad-Din of the Zengid dynasty for his actions against the Shi'a population of Syria. In contrast, however, the Shi'a scholar Abu Turab of Baghdad cursed Saladin for ending Fatimid rule in Egypt, calling him "fasad al-din" (destruction/destroyer of the faith) For more on this, chapter 8 in the book Remembering the Crusades: Myth, Image, and Identity is devoted to different Sunni and Shi'a views of Saladin. The Fatimids actually didn't express any serious ill will towards Twelver Shi'a and Twelvers often served as viziers or advisers to the Fatimid court and even Ibn Abi Tayy acknowledged the grandeur of the great library in Cairo before Saladin turned it into a hospital and destroyed or sold most of its literature. For those Twelvers who felt that in spite of Fatimids Ismaili affiliation that they benefited from the Fatimids or that the Fatimids had created a better environment for their faith to propagate itself and grow, Saladin's seizing of power and his attempts to wipe out the Fatimid bloodline were seen as heinous and an unjustified military coup. While for others like Ibn Abi Tayy, the Fatimids were usurpers just as the Abbasids, and Saladin an admirable warrior who only removed from power false claimants to the Imamate. Even in this thread, we can see that with Marbles defense of the Fatimids and Jahanigrams calling them heretics. Just as there wasn't a strong widespread sense of pan-Islamic unity between Shi'a and Sunnis , there wasn't a widespread sense of pan-Shi'a unity between Ismailis, Zaydis and Ithna Asharis. Whether or not these groups felt any unity with one another largely depended on whether they saw regional or cultural kinship with one another or whether they saw collaboration as being in their best mutual interests. Twelvers might side with Zaydis over Ismailis or with Ismailis over Sunnis or Sunnis over Ismailis depending on the location and various other social and political factors, including the individual character of particular rulers regardless of confession. One reason for the hatred towards Saladin among Shi'a now I think has to do with the resurrection of Saladin in the 20th century as a kind of pan-Islamic hero against Western colonialism which was helped by the Western view of him as a "noble pagan." Dante in his Inferno even puts Saladin in limbo with Ibn Sina and Ibn Rushd as a virtuous unbeliever. But in the Islamic world, Saladin only really became a rallying point for Muslims in the 20th century with the rise of Pan-Arabism and Pan-Islamism. Saladin is now remembered by many Sunnis as a shining example of Islamic chivalry and power, a champion of Islamic unity and even a liberator of Egypt from Shi'a captivity. While Saladin was despised by both Sunni and Shi'a in his own time while at the same time praised by members of both parties, many Sunnis like to paint him as being not only a mujahideen against the Franks, but also part of a wider resistance of the Muslims against a Shi'a menace that was collaborating with the Crusaders (neglecting the fact that Sunnis weren't averse to working with Crusaders when it was to their own benefit during this time and that it was the Zengid ruler Nur ad-Din's attempts to take over the Fatimid empire after having helped the Fatimid vizier Shawar reclaim his position that prompted Shawar himself to strike an alliance with the Crusaders against the Zengids). For this reason, and perhaps in the interest of Shia unity against Sunni polemics designed to denigrate the Shi'a as kafirs or kafir enablers, some Shi'a get more defensive about Saladin because the Sunnis like to mystify his character. Meanwhile, other Shi'a, out of distaste for the Ismailis or out of a desire for greater Islamic unity, might absorb some of the modern cult of Saladin as a way to fit in. It's important to have a historical view of these matters and not allow our religious biases or modern conceptions of unity to color the facts. Exploring and discussing the Shi'ite experience of the Crusades, or I should say EXPERIENCES as each Shi'a sect and regional community within that sect probably experienced the Crusades differently, can help us to create a more nuanced and historical view of the Crusades that breaks down some of the Christian and Sunni myths as well as the classic "Clash of Civilizations" narrative that posits a united Christian world against and united Islamic front (both of which are false constructs)
    2 points
  16. This problem is a relatively new development in Islamic history. A lot of it has to do with culture. In countries that were colonized by the British, the missionaries did their best to instill this Satanic idea that sexuality is a bad thing, and the people bought it. For instance, my people authored the Karma Sutra, and we used to view sex as one of the highest forms of worship, but now...you'd be lucky not to be called a degenerate if you bring up the topic of sex. Arnold J. Toynbee said that when the elite become vulgarized, that civilization is on its way out. This implies that the elite have an immense effect on the social norms of a society. In the Indian subcontinent--India, Pakistan and Bangladesh--the British colonialists got to work by setting up their own schools, whose syllabus was far more advanced than those of the religious institutions. These missionary schools soon became the place where the local elite would send their children. Now what happens when you attend a school run by Catholic NUNS and Catholic Priests? Twelve years into such an education system, and you'd have created an entire generation of cold and hard--yet "proper"--individuals. They had come to believe that celibacy was far cleaner than a healthy conjugal life with their spouse. These individuals, the elite, would go on to shape the society's view on such topics. My own mother attended a missionary school, and she still frowns upon the topic of marriage being discussed. There are many among the elite who actually admire Prophet Jesus more than the Prophet Muhammad(phun&hf)! That's how much damage these missionary schools did to the Muslims. So of course, you're gonna have people who view the idea of marrying for sex as filthy. They've been subconsciously indoctrinated into believing this. The Indian subcontinent and the Arab world suffered the most on account of this. Sex is--and should be--one of the main reasons behind marriage. A healthy sexual life is important for two people to be able to live well together. In the Eastern Wisdom traditions, sexual intercourse is believed to release the essential energy to sustain the entire cosmos. By partaking in this act, we become more in-tune with our primordial self, i.e. closer to our origin--God. It is seen as one of the most powerful ways to become more human, not more animal-like. If only our parents would take the time to read quality literature on the subject. They've turned themselves into "classical Westerners in Eastern bodies." I hope this helped :) Salam.
    2 points
  17. Yes, I know that the Prophet did eventually fight and kill non-Muslims but that because they physically attacked first. I really doubt that David is going to end up outside one of our houses with a chainsaw in his hand. The Prophet never killed anyone simply because they espoused a view he didn't agree with.
    2 points
  18. I want to address the emboldened part, if I may. The Ismailis who ruled the Fatimid dynasty till the last were early forms of what eventually came to be known as Must`ali Ismailis, whose present-day group consists majorly of Dawoodi Bohras. True, they believed in a different line of Imams than us but that does not automatically make them heretics. What you're doing is projecting what later came to be known as Nizari Ismaili belief system to include all Ismailis before and after Nizarism, and on that basis, declaring all of them to be heretics. This is fallacious. Nizari Ismaili Imams abrogated shariah (circa mid-12th century) and proclaimed outrageous innovations which have continued to this day. But before that Ismailis, despite their different Imams and esoteric knowledge system, were considered Muslims because they upheld the basics of Islam. The Ismailis who took a break from the mainstream and were later condemned as heretics were hold up in Persia in their headquarters at Alamut (there were some Nizaris in some Syrian fortress towns too). It is true Salauddin fought against Nizari bands of assassins too, but his military campaigns were mainly directed at dethroning his previous masters in Cairo, against the Fatimids who were not Nizaris, and did not hold beliefs that might make them heretics. That said, it makes no difference to Sunni view of Shi'ism if those Shias were Ismailis. That's the point. And let's face it, the mainstream Shi'ism of that time was Ismailis whether we today like it or not. And this is what Sunni scholars and rulers were up against, including Al-Ghazali. No one bothered about Ithna Asharis who were a secretive group spread about hither and tither and posed no threat to the Sunni establishment due to apolitical worldview then common amongst Ithna Asharis. The moral of the story is that one should be able to differentiate between various Ismaili groups, especially at that time in history, and not blindly pass fatwas of takfir on each and every Ismaili. This I say because even today the most common Must`ali Ismaili group is Dawoodi Bohras and I have yet to see an Ithna Ashari scholar pass takfir on them. If you have some ruling on this regard that proves their kufr, please do share with us.
    2 points
  19. (bismillah) (salam) It is really sad when you have Shia imitating the munafiqeen by supporting kuffar and outside invaders against other Muslims. هو الذي أرسل رسوله بالهدى ودين الحق ليظهره على الدين كله ولو كره المشركون [9:33] ShakirHe it is Who sent His Apostle with guidance and the religion of truth, that He might cause it to prevail over all religions, though the polytheists may be averse. قاتلوا الذين لا يؤمنون باللـه ولا باليوم الآخر ولا يحرمون ما حرم اللـه ورسوله ولا يدينون دين الحق من الذين أوتوا الكتاب حتى يعطوا الجزية عن يد وهم صاغرون[9:29] ShakirFight those who do not believe in Allah, nor in the latter day, nor do they prohibit what Allah and His Apostle have prohibited, nor follow the religion of truth, out of those who have been given the Book, until they pay the tax in acknowledgment of superiority and they are in a state of subjection. لا تجد قوما يؤمنون باللـه واليوم الآخر يوادون من حاد اللـه ورسوله ولو كانوا آباءهم أو أبناءهم أو إخوانهم أو عشيرتهم ۚ أولئك كتب في قلوبهم الإيمان وأيدهم بروح منه ۖ ويدخلهم جنات تجري من تحتها الأنهار خالدين فيها ۚ رضي اللـه عنهم ورضوا عنه ۚ أولئك حزب اللـه ۚ ألا إن حزب اللـه هم المفلحون[58:22] ShakirYou shall not find a people who believe in Allah and the latter day befriending those who act in opposition to Allah and His Apostle, even though they were their (own) fathers, or their sons, or their brothers, or their kinsfolk; these are they into whose hearts He has impressed faith, and whom He has strengthened with an inspiration from Him: and He will cause them to enter gardens beneath which rivers flow, abiding therein; Allah is well-pleased with them and they are well-pleased with Him these are Allah's party: now surely the party of Allah are the successful ones. And of course:لا ينهاكم اللـه عن الذين لم يقاتلوكم في الدين ولم يخرجوكم من دياركم أن تبروهم وتقسطوا إليهم ۚ إن اللـه يحب المقسطين[60:8] ShakirAllah does not forbid you respecting those who have not made war against you on account of (your) religion, and have not driven you forth from your homes, that you show them kindness and deal with them justly; surely Allah loves the doers of justice. However, the Crusaders fought against the Muslims so we continue onto the next ayah:إنما ينهاكم اللـه عن الذين قاتلوكم في الدين وأخرجوكم من دياركم وظاهروا على إخراجكم أن تولوهم ۚ ومن يتولهم فأولئك هم الظالمون[60:9] ShakirAllah only forbids you respecting those who made war upon you on account of (your) religion, and drove you forth from your homes and backed up (others) in your expulsion, that you make friends with them, and whoever makes friends with them, these are the unjust. I don't really agree with the translation of "friends" but you get the main point. wallahu a'lam
    2 points
  20. The Fatimids tried to form a truce with the Crusaders before they reached Jerusalem, but were unable to. Saladin became a vizier to the last Fatimid caliph, but took over after the caliph died and aligned his reign with the caliph of Baghdad. Once Saladin took power, he set about deconstructing Shi'ite power and learning in the region. I have read that he was very anti-Shi'a and even killed many Shi'a Muslims, but I don't know the sources for this. I do know that he was responsible for the death of Suhrawardi though. The last Fatimid caliph, al-Adid, had almost no power, it was mostly the viziers who held power in the last days. If anything, he was a hostage of the intrigues of his viziers, forced to go along with whichever strongman asserted himself in the region until finally Saladin became vizier and at the behest of the Zangids, recognized the caliphate of Baghdad and then upon al-Adid's death, declared himself ruler of Egypt. But Saladin really only became vizier because the Fatimid caliph had no choice. His uncle was aligned with the Zengids and seized Cairo from the previous vizier, who was also a previous Zengid agent before a dispute led said vizier to ally himself with the Crusaders against Saladin's uncle.
    2 points
  21. Good article. In particular the word 'literally' has become a sort of misnomer that's more and more accepted due to widespread (mis)use. It won't be surprising if in a few years time it comes to mean 'figuratively' too, in spite of its actual meaning. We have a precedent for this. Take decimate. It historically meant to kill one person in a group of ten as a warning to the rest. Later it came to mean to cut something in ten parts. Eg, when you cut a piece of meat in ten parts, you decimate it. But further on it changed to mean complete or great destruction. To decimate an army; a town decimated by plague etc. There are other minor mistakes people make all the time but don't think much of it. Take everyone and every one. They can't be used interchangeably. "Every one of us graduated in the year 2014," . 'Every one' means 'each person.' "Everyone knows Khalid is a liar." every one in a group, present or not. Likewise, everyday and every day, everything and every thing, anyone and any one etc. The article mentions 'alot' which is wrong, and so is 'alright'. There's no word such as this. It is all right.
    2 points
  22. That's almost the same logic the IDF uses to justify its strikes on the Palestinians in Gaza. Who are you to pass judgement on these individuals? Are they Israeli military intelligence? Did they personally have any hand in the killing of any Palestinians? As far as we know, they didn't. It doesn't matter if they even support the Israeli government. That isn't cause for killing them in some random, violent attack, and such isn't the example of Ahlul Bayt in any respect. There's no doubt that Palestinians suffer worse under the Israelis, but these sort of attacks don't do anything positive for their cause. They aren't strategic assassinations or anything, they're just unbridled rage. And when you consider that the Israelis are a much more powerful military entity that the only thing that probably keeps them from wiping out Gaza completely is the concern for having good PR, all these kinds of attacks do is play into the hands of those elements of the Israeli government who want to incite war and hostility. Even if it were against some Zionist youth training camp, I'd say it doesn't do the Palestinians much of any real good. It's not a matter of blaming the victim here, it's a matter of asking the Palestinians to have some common sense and to not let the tyranny and violence of the Israeli government cause them to deviate from Islamic principles. What the Palestinians need is good leadership and a greater sense of organization based on true Islamic values of chivalrous resistance, mercy and forgiveness even towards ones enemies, they don't need random gangsters killing Israelis or other Palestinians who don't support their political party. Certainly, one can't blame the Palestinians for being angry, they have every right to be angry at those who stole their land and continue either wittingly or unwittingly to do so, but while Israel is responsible for creating the environment and conditions, the Palestinians are still in the end responsible for how they react to these things. One can resist in ways that aren't violent yet still noble and one can resist in ways that are violent but still chivalrous and honorable and there are plenty of examples in the lives of Ahlul Bayt and their most devoted followers of both and that's what the Palestinians need, not more blood feuds with ordinary Israeli citizens, more of whom are beginning to grow tired of these conflicts with their neighbors, and for whom these sort of events only serve to paint a picture of Palestinians living in their midst as violent squatters with whom they can't reason with. And not only does it cause more suffering for Palestinians, it also causes suffering or embarrassment for other Arabs who otherwise would want to help them.
    2 points
  23. I don't get why people project their fantasy and vision of a good relationship into others' lives. As if their whole world is shattered when others from different cultures/races/sects/etc can coming together. As if they are different species. As if the very law of nature itself is being violated. As if they are personally being violated. So vicarious. People should do what they want.
    2 points
  24. Where do you live? Come and share islamic art and architecture around the world! Imam square, Isfahan, Iran: Isfahan, Iran: Isfahan, Iran: Sheikh_Safi Tomb, Ardabil, Iran:
    2 points
  25. The problem with 'mistake' is that it is ambiguous. These could all be classed as mistakes but they aren't all equal: 1. Sinning 2. Performing a Makruh action 3. Omitting to perform a Mustahab action 4. Choosing a less mustahab action over a more mustahab action 5. Performing an action that causes more hardship for the one who does it, but the action is morally equal to the alternative easier options Prophet's do not perform 1. I'm not sure whether they perform 2. But they can perform 3-5.
    2 points
  26. In my experience, for caking icing, glazes, toppings and the like, there really is no substitute for sugar. I once tried to use Splenda (sucralose) in the place of icing sugar to prepare buttercream icing for a cake and the result was a disaster. The icing would not "fluff" up (it remained rather runny), had a grainy texture, and had an awful "chemical" aftertaste. Never again. I ended up discarding it and making cream cheese icing instead, which requires little sugar. I further decreased the sugar by half and added about 60ml of double cream to give it volume and a more creamy consistency. Something I've seen that does work with some types of confectionery is agave nectar. I've seen it used to make nougat, toffees, and soft caramels. A couple of weeks back, I came across a recipe for salted caramels on Pinterest which used agave nectar in the place of sugar and gave it a try. The caramels turned out nicely as it didn't change the texture or taste at all.
    2 points
  27. My father hired the imam of a local mosque to come to our house every day in the evening for an hour long session to teach us to read Quran. Shias do not bother with the teacher's sectarian affiliations because they are tasked to teach us to read the Quran only; instruction in Islamic teachings is not part of their job. So often Sunni/Wahhabi teachers teach Shia kids and vice versa. But it was Zia-ul-Haq's country where sectarian feelings were growing. So one day as the teacher was instructing me something came up about Muharram and Shias and he said to our servant, who used to hang around, that it is forbidden to drink water from a Shia's hand, as it gets polluted, because Shias are kafirs. Our servant, who himself was a Shia, told him, with a laugh, that we were Shias! The mullah didn't believe him, as if Shias were a tiny community only found in newspaper reports. But he soon realised it was no joke; he jumped up, set aside the glass of water which he had asked and was drinking from, and hurried out of the main gates and ran to his pigeonhole of a mosque. Apart from one, all my Quran teachers have been Sunnis, and almost all of them knew we were a Shia family but it never was a problem. Apart from that, during all my social transactions in Pakistan as a Shia, I do not recall any thing negative enough to remember, apart from general negative remarks which I sometimes hear from people who don't know I'm Shia. This is also because my full name and family name is not considered Shia (indeed, most of my father's extended family are Sunnis). So once it happened that the vegetable vendor from whom I buy on my way home remarked on a mutual acquaintance who had died not so long ago. He said 'Mr. xyz Rizvi was a wonderful person; very generous and pious; the only problem is that he was a Shia." I laughed and told him he should not be so narrow-minded. I also told him that I was a Shia too. Oh he was suitably red-faced and apologised profusely. I don't make a show of my sectarian affiliations and refrain from controversial talk; ordinary Sunnis with a life are cool and don't interfere or make negative remarks about Shia beliefs; but of course I come across plenty of Sunnis or Wahhabis who don't like Shias. I don't bother what they think or say behind my back, as long as they maintain decorum and follow the golden formula of live and let live.
    2 points
  28. (bismillah) (salam) , InshAllah you are well! I wanted to open up a thread in which we can share ideas about how we can encourage the youth to WANT to become practicing Muslims in a place where Islamic teachings are either scarce or nonexistent. There are so many theories about how to go about this roaming around the internet and speech but very little 'practical' ideas that have been implemented in community centers and/or mosques in the West. Having said that, what kind of fun activities have you done ( or think could be done) to teach shia Islam whilst making it engaging for youth/young adults who really feel 'forced' to be there? Here are a few ideas that I've come across by either consulting or practicing: -Organizing a theatrical plays/movies about an Islamic teaching or history -Islamic Book reading club -Creating a question and answer competitions like jeopardy between two groups -painting projects regarding islamic events -molding clay into historical islamic events -photo/video/art contests -teaching kids about charity by helping them make their personalized piggy banks -keeping a 'kind acts' and 'sins' (the sins should be personal not for sharing) diary / or jar to be more creative---personalizing the jar or notebook could be another activity -making 'ya hossain' headbands -Islamic sleepover retreats -islamic movie nights -making a piñata with written 'sin's on it, so when you hit it, you are 'symbolically' hitting away the sins - having a sisters panel to discuss hejab and the youth insecurities about it - skyping/google hangout speakers from around the nation or globe -making 12 groups to research facts about the 12 imams, then to present their findings on small posters. collectively binding that into a book about the Ahlul bait as. -Giving water/hot chocolate out during ashura -Repeating quranic verses for students to memorize& quran competitions -teaching about eating halal/haram by having a game where they have to add the feather on the turkeys tail while being blindfolded--the activity's introduction could be a mini speech about halal meat? -making a massive paper tree and having the youth to write things that they are thankful for on separate leaves -s c r a p booking -having mini lectures given by members of the community & provide snacks -have sporting events as a means to bond -drawing/crafting/baking/cooking etc. workshops as a means to bond -making a family tree of the Ahlul Bait as whilst telling stories -having a friday or sunday school AND inviting parents for a mini parent-teacher conferences once a semester -creating a youth/young adult committee -creating a point system where youth can receive prizes for rewards -writing poetry given certain key words -taking the youth/young adult to the zoo/ice skating etc to bring compassion -Canned good drive to the homeless -volunteering at Elderly homes -writing letters to self about self improvements to be handed back to the individuals a year later -making an islamic activities diary to pass along the next generation -translating islamic text as a group ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ updating the list based on thread responses: -bake sale -Essay competition- [Give the youth a topic and ask them to compose an essay of a certain number of words. Have three judges from adults who will choose the three best essays. Have the three winners read their essay aloud to everyone. Award them with small prizes. Give a small gift to everyone who participated. Talk about having the same event in the future and hoping to make it an annual event.] A movie night [would be really good for teenagers if you could find an engaging way to criticize and look at a movie Islamically. If content is an issue, there are places where you can purchase edited versions of movies that have been edited for broadcast television.] If you are a parent, teacher or anyone with a creative mind, I would love to have your input to implement such activities at our youth/young adult Islamic centers someday inshAllah. Please keep adding to the list. It could be a good parenting guide for all of us. jazakAllah khairan & thanks so much in advance! Mysterious secrets
    1 point
  29. Bright

    What Comes Before Proposal?

    I think khakis are good, but I would avoid ones that have pockets ("cargo pants"). A polo shirt might be good enough, but I think a long-sleeve dress shirt would be better. I'm guessing you could find probably find one for 10 Pounds or less... Maybe there are stores or web sites with nice shirts on clearance? I don't know about shoes... do people in the UK wear shoes inside the house? But the shoes you wear to the house/doorstep should go along with the rest of the outfit. In my view, if a guy is hard-working and intelligent (regarding this issue, leaving aside other compatibility factors), then that's good enough because a lot of good things flow out of those 2 qualities. But I'm just saying as a factual statement, I think a lot of parents want a clear path to a middle-class (or upper-class) lifestyle for their daughter. I think that's why you see in other threads, people mention issues due to parents looking for a groom who is a doctor or engineer (or on that track), or some other high-salary job. To some extent though, I think parents who have lived in a Western country for a long time won't care as much about that... they more so would want someone who will treat their daughter well. But my guess is that it will be an issue in at least some cases, so it would be better to think ahead of time about how to address any of those concerns.
    1 point
  30. notme

    What Comes Before Proposal?

    You can't go wrong with something between "professional" and "business casual". You want to be comfortable, but look smart. Jeans and a nice shirt might be ok, but it wouldn't hurt to take it up a notch.
    1 point
  31. ^ Hello, Did you vote for Ayatollah Khamenei in the last election? All the Best, David
    1 point
  32. Ali Musaaa :)

    Focus In Prayers

    (salam) Try making wudhu before the prayer time sets in. Then, about 5 minutes before salah time commences, go to wherever it is you pray and sit down on your prayer mat with tasbeeh beads. Spend a few minutes just relaxing, making dhikr of Allah [swt] and some du'a before the prayer. Then when prayer starts you may feel more focused. Also, trying reciting (the actually Qira'at) slower than you normally would. I find this helps me. Hope that helps iA :)
    1 point
  33. Im Syed Mohammed Hassan 16 year old in my.last year at schoop Living in Chennai ,India Im one of rarest Indian who loves football(Indian+European)
    1 point
  34. Don't worry Mo'mineen are brothers and sisters to each other, no matter their race or nationality. And I am very glad you did not listen to those racists. I just meant the Racist Arabs.
    1 point
  35. Me too. Coffee is fine in the morning. Wine in the evening. Opposite is not advisable working days.
    1 point
  36. Speaking of materialism, I'd love to have a room just like this one. Except I want a sliding ladder directly on the book shelf, like they have in movies.
    1 point
  37. Not sure about unbiased reporting but if you want pro-ISIS reportage do take the trouble of visiting websites and Facebook pages and Twitter account run by their clandestine media relations people sitting in Doha, Dubai and Riyadh, Tel Aviv etc.
    1 point
  38. Yet far more people watch far more movies than read far more books. So don't bother pinning the thread, for this means whereas the book thread might be, and has been, relegated to the back pages, the movie/video thread will ensure itself to remain on top.
    1 point
  39. There is no such thing.
    1 point
  40. Suppose a group of Pastafarians (of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster) invade and occupy part of a Muslim country. They expel the local population, build a colony, and start to live there with their families, while their army protects the community from reprisals. The Muslim army attacks the colony to win it back. Obviously the settlers in that part of the Muslim country know that they are settlers and invaders and living in a country that does not belong to them but since they have conquered it by force, they consider it their right to be there. So now when the Muslim army launches the counter-attack, would the very fact of the enemy being invaders and settlers negate the Islamic laws of jihad warfare which forbid the killing of unarmed people, and of women, children and the old; forbid destroying property and setting crops on fire, and poisoning the water supply? The answer is no; the laws regulating warfare cannot be relativised, whether Muslim army is fighting on home turf or abroad, if those laws can't be adhered to, they are as good as null and void in any case, for all times. The reason I used a hypothetical scenario and did not mention Israel or Zionists is because it's easy to see the point this way, because as soon as you mention Israel and Palestine, passions heat up to red zone, people get too excited, begin hyperventilating, steaming at the ears and frothing at the mouth, and ready to equivocate the laws, willing to do anything that might harm the other side. Some of these tactics may be good political tactics (such as poisoning water supply of the enemy settlement, so they are killed en masse without the fight) but this would also kill the Islamic laws regulating jihad warfare. The same is the case with the attack on unarmed people praying at a place of worship. If we argue the other way, and start offering interpretations and explanations of the classic fiqh laws, then what we have done is thrown shariah out of the window. If that's how some people want to fight the Zionist settlers, so be it, but they shouldn't call their acts as acts of jihad or use Islamic slogans to justify their tactics. Since we are quick to condemn the Salafi-Wahhabi hordes for relativising and reinterpreting jihad laws (which are as clear in Sunni books as in Shia ones) to fit their own agenda of murder and mayhem, we shall have to do be consistent about this on other fronts too.
    1 point
  41. Interesteller wasnt too bad actually.
    1 point
  42. A good place to start would be to read the verses immediately before and after the ones quoted, so you can see how out of context those verses are taken by enemies of Islam. A great example of that would be 9:5.
    1 point
  43. Once you got all the voluntary people to wear one. This will generate a pressure group for o there's to wear it to prove you are chaste. Probably have midnight chaste walks wearing them over your clothes to demonstrate how chaste you are. parents would pressure their kids , daughter in laws to wear them. Yes a nice business could be formed both for the selling of chastity belts and the holding of keys. Leading straight on from there would be the underground courses on how to pick locks. Have you considered a career as a chief of chastity in the new Islamic State
    1 point
  44. Salam sister, You needed a male perspective so here I am:) I was married a year ago to a wonderful woman. Ours was an arranged marriage so you can imagine the feelings on our weeding night. Unable to consummate our marriage was a great blow to my self esteem. In the beginning I thought it was my fault that I couldn't get it over with meanwhile causing great pain to my beloved without any result. We tried every night for the next few nights before I finally gave up. I read a lot about ED before deciding that all the symptoms were not appropriate to my situation.. Ergo.. Has to be something the matter with the light of my life. I visited a specialist OB with my wife and explained the problem we were facing. In 20 minutes she was back after her examination and explained to us everything about vaginimus. Counseled us to keep trying but through different ways which I don't feel comfortable writing about here and sent us on our way. We tried.. And tried.. And tried.. And failed.. We visited The OB.. God bless her soul who set us on the path to recovery.. explained to us that there is no cure for the problem.. That the problem existed solely in her head.. She told my wife right in front of me that if she couldn't get over the fear and resulting bodily conditions during our intimacy.. That this marriage was doomed and that she had seen lots of marriages go down the drain as a result of this problem. I could have argued.. Could have professed my will and commitment.. Some instinct told me to shut up... The will to make a go of something.. The fear of losing someone.. Is a great motivator.. This time it wasn't me coaxing my better half into bed for another go.. From that visit to the OB.. Something changed.. I for one should say that by this time I had all but given up.. Completely frustrated and the way things had turned out the last 9 months we had been together.. This time it was the future mother of my children that attacked me in bed and promised me that this time it would be better.. We tried.. Again and again for the next few weeks.. Her will undaunted.. Untill we succeeded.. We are expecting our first born in a couple of months and are ecstatic.. Sure you can wait for the counselling.. I'm guessing you are saving up.. But what I'm trying to say is.. You need not.. After that first time.. About 11 months into our marriage we still had problems starting but are going great now.. I have tried to present our experience in a light manner although this situation you are in is nothing but.. I wish you all the luck and hope for your speedy recovery.. I would in the end say that it was my wife that got us through this.. It was her that dragged me to the finish line.. Or to the start ;) All the best.. Was salam
    1 point
  45. Wasalam, Im not surprised you are so upset. I know you love your husband and dont want to think bad of him, but there is no real excuse for going astray 1.5 years into a marriage when the only issue you have is penetrative sex due to a medical condition. There are other ways to get sexual relief with your partner that doesnt involve vaginal sex (im not advocating anything makrooh here, but there are other sexual acts that men like very much). I imagine that the pain you feel over his straying is exacerbating the issue you have between each other. In terms of the medical condition, it could be that you need lots of foreplay, basically anything that increases your pleasure and relaxation (you might consider a 'toy' to use between you). A hot bath, massage, gentleness and a slow build up will help. Also, i think it would be better if the position you try with one another is where you are in control, where you husband pretty much just lays there and you are controlling what is happening. Talking therapy should help as well as visualisations with regard to relaxation, which can have quite a profound affect on the body. Make a deal with your husband that your aim when you make love will not be to have penetrative sex, that way, if it doesnt happen you wont feel bad and you wont be thinking that in a moment you have to try. Just have fun with each other and get lots of that oxytocin flowing to bond you both and make you feel comforted and connected. It would be great for you and the quality and longevity of your relationship if you could make a pact with each other that you will focus your attention on the relationship between the 2 of you to give it the best chance, rather that instigating situations that will only make that harder.
    1 point
  46. Hello everyone. I have seen inception recently, and it was good and very interesting movie.. I think one should really look for it...
    1 point
  47. Ali Musaaa :)

    Banned Members

    Invoker banned for insulting another member (once again). After reciving 9 warnings (many for the same offence) his conduct has not improved.
    1 point
  48. Salam 'Alaykum. Thank you everyone! Brother, I thought we were allowed to ask for Madad from the Imams...correct me if I'm wrong please :) Thank you, this was great. It was very informative. I thank for your Duas ^^ I'm actually trying to instill the love of Ahlul Bayt(as) in my seven year old brother, so please pray that I'm successful. I'm also desperately trying to get my mother to convert to Shi'ism, but I dont know how that will turn out. But sabr pays off, so i'll be at it. Those links will be very useful to me :D Actually, Hassanain Rajabali was the reason I started reasearching Shi'ism in the first place. I remember watching his debate with Dan Barker and later heard he was Shia. Curious, I began learning about Shi'ism and felt myself being swept away by the flood of truth I came across. I owe Hassanain Rajabali a spiritual debt, I suppose.
    1 point
  49. Bismillah When i was looking into the subject a year or two ago, and when referring to the ahadith in al-Kaafi only confused me further, i was fortunate enough to find a scholar who guided me to a few articles on the subject. I will attach one here, and inshallah mention the names of the others. Bada.doc The other is 'Bada' by M Ayoub. Shaykh Misbah Yazdi (hz) has also attempted to discuss it in his book 'Theological Instructions', but i remember that wasn't to clear for me - but still i would recommend you check it out. The discussions on Bada a little more complicated then stated by the posts here (although the posts are good in their own respect), and there is actually a really good explanation behind how God can be worshiped through the concept of bada' (making it an `ibadah excelling over some others). If i find it, inshallah i will post it here (i don't want to explain it in my own words because i feel i have forgotten parts, so that may affect the quality of the explanation).
    1 point
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