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    • In islam we are also encouraged to get rid of the nafs because none of this worldly life belongs to us and when we die, it will be an easy transition as we dont see things as belonging to us, this heavely goes against the individualist beleifs as they tell you that this thing or even your body is YOURS and you can do whatever you want as long as you dont hurt others with it, for example, but we know full well that these things are all given by Allah(stw). In islam we also have Allah(stw) as you mentionned that tell the individual that they can change their destiny they have control of their actions, which also goes against some aspects of collectivsm.
    • @iCenozoic I think examples from The Islamic Republic of Iran would prove to be more formidable. Arabi is an atheist, activist and blogger. He's in an Iranian prison, in bad shape both emotionally and physically. His crime? Blasphemy: writing insulting Facebook posts about the prophet Muhammad, the Supreme Leader of Iran Ali Khamenei and other Iranian officials. Arabi was arrested in December 2013 and sentenced to death for blasphemy. In July 2015, upon appeal, his death sentence was reduced to seven and a half years in prison and two years of religious studies to cure him of his atheism. In addition to physical problems caused by various hunger strikes, Arabi has been tortured, resulting in blunt trauma to his testicles and a broken nose, amongst other injuries. Refusing to be silenced, he was later sentenced to an additional three years in prison, exile and a fine on charges of “propaganda against the state” and “insulting the sacred and the supreme leader” because of his open letters highlighting inhumane prison conditions of political prisoners in Iran. As if to rub the mullahs’ noses in it, he signs letters as Soheil Arabi, Atheist. Source: https://newhumanist.org.uk/articles/5606/thousands-were-released-in-iran-but-not-atheist-prisoner-soheil-arabi @Ashvazdanghe Brother what can you tell us about the case of Soheil Arabi, and do you think forcing him to undergo religious studies as well as torturing him, which I don't see how such two polars could really help in anything, other then establish greater disillusion. Was this all necessary do you support these measures and if so why? I tagged you because I know you are an avid supporter and defender of Ayatollah Khamenai and the Islamic Republic, which I respect and admire, but at times stand and question.
    • I use Saudi Arabia because almost everyone here, recognizes that the countries government is unjust with respect to how it treats other religions. I could point to other countries, but I'm just trying to find common ground that others here would agree with. https://www.hrw.org/news/2014/03/20/saudi-arabia-new-terrorism-regulations-assault-rights
    • "It all depends on what you consider important in life." This is true. But the difference is that one side of the coin, is willing to kill, literally to kill, the opposition. While the other side of the coin, is not. People wanted to kill, and perhaps still want to kill Salman Rushdie.  But if someone here on SC calls the apostle Paul a terrorist (which just recently happened), nobody wants to kill this person, despite it being blasphemy against Christianity. It's the same thing with the phrase "sticks and stones will break my bones, but words will never hurt me". Some things warrant combat, and death of enemies. But other things such as the example of the preaching atheist above, do not. No more should a Muslim preacher be murdered for preaching Islam, should an atheist preacher be murdered for preaching a secularist idea. Even though some Muslims might "feel" as though their beliefs are more "important in life", it's about equality. It's not about what neo Nazis "feel" nor is it about what Christians or Muslims "feel". It's about equality.  Some atheists probably would want to kill Muslims for preaching. Indeed in some instances, people have attacked and killed Muslims because they were proselytizing in favor of Islam. But these actions are wrong, just as it would be wrong to kill the preaching atheist.  
    • Could you explain what you see the merit being? Racism is a pretty commonly understood concept, and most people don’t understand it as having anything to do with power structures. For example, the sense in which you use racism below isn’t predicated on that. Personally, I don’t understand why it would be sensible to define racism as only being possible if done by an ‘oppressor’ group against an ‘oppressed’ group. If for no other reason than you would need to start by ranking all racial and ethnic groups in order of ‘oppression’ to decide who can and cannot be racist (can a Chinese person be racist towards a Pakistani?). It is also the case that power dynamics are very localised. Even if the majority population is white, you tend to have areas which are predominantly non-white, and where a white person could be at a disadvantage (think of a single white kid in an all-nonwhite school). Yet the upholders is this new orthodoxy would tell us that this single white kid is still not capable of experiencing racism. I don’t really see the issue with this. It seems like normal human behaviour to put more trust in people you have more in common with, and makes a lot of rational sense. And as you yourself say, it’s not necessarily anything to do with race. It’s not clear to me why that would be. After all, it could just as well be argued that the common experience of oppression would be a powerful binding factor. The very long history of antisemitism in Europe didn’t seem to do much to break the bonds of trust between Jews after all. Generally I find that too much weight is put on this idea of the effects of the long periods of slavery, without it ever being precisely explained how exactly these effects are supposed to be felt today.
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In the Name of God بسم الله

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