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In the Name of God بسم الله

Imamology

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Mecca or the Mechanical

Qa'im

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Why have we turned Mecca into the Mechanical?

Mecca is the central pinnacle of human assembly, yet its architecture has been modeled after the capitals of individualism: New York, London, Toronto, and Las Vegas.

Its Ottoman heritage is being destroyed, its mountains are being removed, its mosques are being leveled, and all of it is being replaced with gray skyscrapers, McDonalds, Starbucks, cranes, and boxy buildings.

Over the centuries, our civilization has developed an architectural style, beautiful calligraphy, symmetrical patterns, captivating minarets, and iconic domes. Our mosques were designed to remind us of the divine order of the creation and the beauty of our revelation. We built the marvels that are Istanbul and Isfahan. The Taj Mahal, the Alhambra in Spain, the Dome of the Rock, and the Suleymaniye Mosque are some of the most elegant structures in the world.

The Protestant work-ethic cities in the West were designed with only utility in mind. They designed their cities to maximize profits and productivity, and to minimize costs. Anglo-Saxon culture deviated from the traditional beauty of Catholic architectural style, and they continue to deviate in other areas of morality. After British and American imperialism, Muslims are now emulating their worldly masters in an effort to look “modern”. This has led to the monstrosity that is Dubai and Tehran; cities with no heart and soul, only pollution, traffic, and eyesores.

Ethics is but a branch of aesthetics. Winning back our civilization also means returning to our therapeutic artstyle. We have no need for a concrete jungle in our holiest city.

The Prophet Muhammad (saw) said, "When you see holes pierced through the mountains of Mecca, and when you see the buildings surpass the mountaintops in height, then know that the affair (the Hour) has cast its shadow." (Musannaf Ibn Abi Shayba)

قال حدثنا غندر عن شعبه عن يعلى بن عطاء عن أبيه عن عمرو بن العاص((إذا رأيت مكة قد بعجت كظائم ، ورأيت البناء يعلو رؤوس الجبال فاعلم أن الأمر قد أضلك ))



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On ‎2017‎-‎09‎-‎02 at 9:34 PM, Grillz said:

you know how he says the hour has cast a shadow what if that is the clock tower casting a shadow(just a theory)

Ive heard this interpretation from Shaykh Hamza Yusuf, very interesting indeed.

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Although we a narration in Al-Kafi which speaks against having buildings higher than the Ka'aba (if I remember correctly) - do we have any narrations, like the Sunni one above, which talks about these buildings in an end times context?

Also, is it true that the Imam (as) when he returns will destroy the Masjid Al-Haram and return it to the way it was before? Does that have something to do with the buildings we see today?

Edited by E.L King

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21 hours ago, E.L King said:

Although we a narration in Al-Kafi which speaks against having buildings higher than the Ka'aba (if I remember correctly) - do we have any narrations, like the Sunni one above, which talks about these buildings in an end times context?

Also, is it true that the Imam (as) when he returns will destroy the Masjid Al-Haram and return it to the way it was before? Does that have something to do with the buildings we see today?

I would understand why he would destroy them but wont it cause a big mess and where will the people performing hajj go to sleep. One of the reasons they built those big buildings is to accommodate people going on hajj  

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I totally agree. With the recent tragedies attributed to miscalculated crowd control (and else), your thoughts are the first thing that came to mind.

Saudis issue haj quotas to keep the turn-out in line to avoid over populating the pilgrimage site. Yet, no quota is set on the brick and mortar circus. I see a more sinister plan at play having boxed in the site and leaving little next to zero room for expansion. They can't even manage the current flow of visitors let alone the fast growing numbers expected in the years to come. Then again, it's hardly bad planning, at least the Saudis can enjoy a fillet-o-fish from McDees and maybe a pumpkin spice Latte from Starbucks....what more do they need for a free ticket to heaven.

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Brother, I'm actually confused. I don't wish to come across as overly critical, nor do I wish to go off topic, but you've presented a quote as the words of Rasoolallah (s), yet it's from the musannaf of Ibn Abi Shayba and it's narrated by amr ibn al-aas, an enemy of the ahlulbayt. Surely it's unwise to do this for two reasons, which are:

1) There's a big chance you're attributing words to Rasoolallah (s) which are not his, which has serious consequences.

2) You strengthen what may be a false narrative about the end times for unsuspecting Shi'a who look up to long-time posters such as yourself.

These two are negated if you can find a reliable hadith which reports the same thing in our own sources, but then why didn't you quote that in the first place?

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