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Sadaat

To all Indo-Pak Syeds

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(bismillah)

(salam)

being a syed implies as having the genes of our prophet

from both/either mothers/fathers side

was jesus born without a father?

i believe we all are syeds as that gene was created

by our ONE lord who is omnipotent

regards and blessing

in_dwelling

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Gene? What are you basing this on?

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(bismillah)

(salam)

based on the understanding of the words

gene/jinn  :!!!:

try researching works of medicine

:)

peace be

in_dwelling

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I know what a "gene" is, but I'm starting to doubt you know, too. I'm asking you HOW you can say that Syeds carry a gene of our Prophet (pbuh). I am asking you what you base this claim on. The Qu'ran? The Sunnah? What? :unsure:

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being a syed implies as having the genes of our prophet

from both/either mothers/fathers side

was jesus born without a father?

i believe we all are syeds as that gene was created

by our ONE lord who is omnipotent

regards and blessing

in_dwelling

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes, Jesus was born without a father

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Typical of Shiachat people to go totally off topic.

I request those people who claimed "everyone is Syed" to delete their posts or for moderator to now close this topic.

If you want to go continue your science/medicine theory create your own topic - it doesn't cost you any money to do so.

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(salam)

So basically you are referring to 99% of the Indian & Pakistani population. :D

Khoda Hafez

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think you're a bit of a loser.

Do your parents think so too?

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What I've learnt is: I know a supposed "Syed" who's from South Africa, originally India (sunni)...

But when you look at the lineage; he is actually the an ancestor of Uthmaan  :lol:

He says that he is from the prophet's family if you ask him... Because he says the word "Syed" comes from "syidinah" (Hence Sydinah Uthmaan)

Does that make sense :huh:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

(bismillah)

hahha actualy .. brother .. sunni's believe the prophet had 3 daughters. Rukeya, Um Kalthoum and sayidatna fatima. We believe the two other woman were Khadijat il kulbra's daughers from previous marriage. And luckily Uthman married both of them. So Many do claim lineage to the prophet through them. I've met a few ahhahaha .. always fun to hear.

Salam

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I think you're a bit of a loser.

Do your parents think so too?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Nahh, I do not think so. :)

Can anyone here say they have actually never wondered why so many Indians and Pakistani's call themselves syed, and whether or not it can be true that so many of them claim it?

In my short lifetime I have come across more Paki/Indian people that say they are syed than the Muslims from all other countries combined. Even on this website the most who claim it are the Pakistani's and Indians. I am not saying that any of them are not, what I am asking is if it makes sense, and if others have wondered about this too.

To me it seems a whole culture around being syed has developed in those two countries. Not only that, but I notice some radical opinions they have of themselves.

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Nahh, I do not think so. :)

Can anyone here say they have actually never wondered why so many Indians and Pakistani's call themselves syed, and whether or not it can be true that so many of them claim it?

In my short lifetime I have come across more Paki/Indian people that say they are syed than the Muslims from all other countries combined. Even on this website the most who claim it are the Pakistani's and Indians. I am not saying that any of them are not, what I am asking is if it makes sense, and if others have wondered about this too.

To me it seems a whole culture around being syed has developed in those two countries. Not only that, but I notice some radical opinions they have of themselves.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

If you used the grey matter between your ears, it might help you to understand why there are Syeds in India and Pakistan. A bit of history wouldn't go amiss either.

Edited by Youth Of Ali

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Aoa,

i am a syed..........i have a whole big shajra of my family till Imam Jaffer-e-sadiq.

well family name is shamsi sabzwari

our ancestors were in multan...... syed shah shamas sabzawar

who was from iran in sabzawar.....

well my dad has got the shajra

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[Nahh, I do not think so.

Can anyone here say they have actually never wondered why so many Indians and Pakistani's call themselves syed, and whether or not it can be true that so many of them claim it?

In my short lifetime I have come across more Paki/Indian people that say they are syed than the Muslims from all other countries combined. Even on this website the most who claim it are the Pakistani's and Indians. I am not saying that any of them are not, what I am asking is if it makes sense, and if others have wondered about this too.

To me it seems a whole culture around being syed has developed in those two countries. Not only that, but I notice some radical opinions they have of themselves.

]

well i guess u should know syeds are very strict to marry syeds only so you shouldnt doubt such a thing

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well i guess u should know syeds are very strict to marry syeds only so you shouldnt doubt such a thing

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Which is wrong, a syed can marry any Muslim. It is a false belief that a syed can only marry a syed.

Anyhow, It still does not explain why there seem to be more pakistani/indians syeds than arab or iranian.

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Which is wrong, a syed can marry any Muslim. It is a false belief that a syed can only marry a syed.

Anyhow, It still does not explain why there seem to be more pakistani/indians syeds than arab or iranian.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

arab/iranian families arent so strict...they get their daughters married off 2 any1

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If you used the grey matter between your ears, it might help you to understand why there are Syeds in India and Pakistan. A bit of history wouldn't go amiss either.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

:lol:

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arab/iranian families arent so strict...they get their daughters married off 2 any1

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Can one only be considered syed if both the parents are so too?

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if the father is syed..

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

So how exactly does that affect the growth in any way? Lets do a little test:

Condition one:

Syed Husband

Non-syed Wife

Result: Children are syed

Condition two:

Syed Husband

Syed Wife

Result: Children are syed

Condition three:

Non-syed Husband

Syed mother

Result: Children are not syed

From the above we can conclude that it does not matter who the syed woman marries because their children's being syed depends on the father anyway. So the woman can be s[Edited Out]ped. But no matter who the syed husband marries, their children will be syed.

So how does it make sense to say there are more Pakistani & Indian syeds than the rest because they are more strict? The result will be the same no matter who they marry.

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So how exactly does that affect the growth in any way? Lets do a little test:

Condition one:

Syed Husband

Non-syed Wife

Result: Children are syed

Condition two:

Syed Husband

Syed Wife

Result: Children are syed

Condition three:

Non-syed Husband

Syed mother

Result: Children are not syed

From the above we can conclude that it does not matter who the syed woman marries because their children's being syed depends on the father anyway. So the woman can be s[Edited Out]ped. But no matter who the syed husband marries, their children will be syed.

So how does it make sense to say there are more Pakistani & Indian syeds than the rest because they are more strict? The result will be the same no matter who they marry.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

because u see ur condition 3...it doesnt happen as much in pak/india

how will the results be the same? i dont c wer u comin from...i mean if their syed daughters marry non syed men that means the kids arent gona b syed.

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because u see ur condition 3...it doesnt happen as much in pak/india

how will the results be the same? i dont c wer u comin from...i mean if their syed daughters marry non syed men that means the kids arent gona b syed.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

But bro, you just said it depends on the father. Not the mother if the children are syed or not. In that case, option 3 would not matter at all.

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But bro, you just said it depends on the father. Not the mother if the children are syed or not. In that case, option 3 would not matter at all.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i still dont understand u. yes it matters on the father...but if the women arent marrying syed men then the kids wont be syed and if a lot arabs are doing this then u see how they lack syeds?

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i still dont understand u. yes it matters on the father...but if the women arent marrying syed men then the kids wont be syed and if a lot arabs are doing this then u see how they lack syeds?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It is a simple mathematical matter bro. :)

Simple:

If it depends on the father if the child will be syed or not, then who cares what the woman does? Because either way, the children of the man will be seyed, but the children of the woman will not.

Do you understand?

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It is a simple mathematical matter bro. :)

Simple:

If it depends on the father if the child will be syed or not, then who cares what the woman does? Because either way, the children of the man will be seyed, but the children of the woman will not.

Do you understand?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

naa

i think this is jus gona go in circles.

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Seems as though you people have a hard time with logic.

It doesn't matter if a Syeda (Syed woman) marries a Syed or a non-Syed - it has no influence on the number of Syeds in the world.

Syed man can marry anyone and the children will be Syed - this does have an influence of the Syed population.

Keep reading the above statements until you understand what I mean

--

People do have a problem with a Syeda marrying a non-Syed because they believe it is haraam - the topic has been discussed several times and using the Search feature would be more beneficial than discussing it here.

Edited by Sadaat

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It's an old thread. I am rejuvenating it, because I was doing a search on "peharsar" and this thread popped up.

Many of the Ja'fari syyeds (coming orignally from india or pakistani muhajirs) come from a village called Peharsar. This town was settled/conquered/liberated by our ancestor known affectionately as "dada-ji jalaal", or more properly Jalaluddin. As far as I know, this was in the time of Sultan Altumish, but if that's wrong anyone may correct me here.

It's true that almost all Jafaris from present-day India came from the state of Bharatpur in Eastern Rajasthan (places such as Peharsar, Bayana). A booklet was once published by Peharsiris in Karachi, describing the history of that area. It also mentioned the ancestors of Peharsiri Jafris. I doubt if his name was Jalaluddin. But I do know the name of his brother, Abdullah, who because of his religious knowledge, was called Abdullah Qalander.

I'm not sure when Jalaluddin (no idea if he is also "shah jalal") settled there, but I'm guessing he probably came with the conquering army of sultan mahmud. Any other Jafris care to elabrorate here?

You are right here. Those two brothers, Abdullah and ... other (Jalal?) did come in Mahmud Ghaznavi's army. I read their history it in the book I mentioned above. Here is what I recount:

The time is around 1000 AD. The place is somewhere in East Rajesthan. There is a Hindu rajah (loosely, rajah=king), who, like all other rajahs, is fond of sex, and can order any girl to his palace.

The Muslim immigration to India has already begun. We have this Iranian man, named Hasan, who supplies oil to the rajah. He is referred to in that book as 'Hasan raughan-gar' or 'Hasan tayli'. Once oil was required in rajah's palace, so one of his men came to Hasan's home to get oil. Hasan was not home. So Hasan's daughter gave him oil. Even though she did not come in front of rajah's man, but this man did see her reflection on pot or something, while she was pouring oil. He was amazed by her beauty. He went back and told rajah of her. Rajah asked Hasan to bring his daughter to his court. Hasan refused. Of course, Hasan knew why rajah wanted him to bring his daughter. When rajah saw that Hasan won't budge then one day he ordered his men to forcefully barge in Hasan's house and bring the girl to him.

Hasan was devastated at his outrage. He demanded rajah to let his daughter go, or otherwise he threatened to ask Mahmud to invade rajah. At that time Mahmud's attacks on India had already started. Rajah thought of Hasan's threat as mere bluff.

Hasan left the place, and went straight to Mecca for Hajj. After performing Hajj he went to Ghazni. He saw Mahmud but couldn't get close to him because of the crowd around him. I don't know how many days did he try. The story says that Mahmud had a dream in which someone told him that there is a man looking for his help. I don't know how true is this story about dream, but in anycase, Hasan finally succeeded in getting Mahmud's attention. He told all his story to Mahmud, and asked his help.

Now our ancestors Abdullah Qalander Jafri and his brother (Jalal?) used to be in Mahmud's court. They were well-reputed religious personalities originally from Shiraz, but had moved to Ghazni because Mahmud Ghaznavi liked to invite scholars from everywhere.

After hearing Hasan's tale, Mahmud sent an army to teach that SoB rajah a lesson. The army went under the command of AbuBakr Qandahari (ironic, hehe), and the two brothers, our heroes in this story, were with him. When rajah heard of Mahmud's army coming to invade his place, he realized it must have been because of Hasan.

Anyway. They fought, and we won ... after a hard battle. Then they moved to conquer other places in that area. One of those places was Pehersar. They named it Peharsar because they conquered this place only in a couple of hours ("sar"=conquered).

The land of Peharsar was given to the two Jafri brothers in recognition of their services in this expedition. The brothers then invited their relatives from Shiraz to come and live in this place.

It is said that about 200-300 families moved from Shiraz to Pehersar.

Unfortunately, it is not known whethere Hasan's daughter was freed or not.

In 1947, everyone in Peharsar moved to Pakistan, as they were under constant threat from Hindu mobs. Peharsar was being threatened by the people with whom they lived for about a thousand year. Peharsar was being threatened by the rajah of Bharatpur, rajah of the same state which the saadaat of Peharsar helped establish in the first place, and which they always supported. Today, there are hardly any traces of those people remain now.

Edited by Excalibur

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I found this little about Peharsar on the net:

http://www.travels.ndtv.com/xtopspot.asp?topspot=Peharsar

Welcome to Chandra Mahal Haveli. Chandra Mahal Haveli is a 19th century heritage property, in a little village called Peharsar, about 150 kilometres from Jaipur.

‘Pehar’sar

There is an interesting story about how the village got its name. Two generals of Sultan Mahmud (The Jafri brothers in the story I just told) conquered the village in the space of three hours or what is a ‘pehar’ and hence the name Peharsar. The Chandra Mahal Haveli was originally built in the 1860s by the Shia nobility, which came to live here (that's us, ahem). Peharsar eventually became part of Bharatpur. It is said that for generations, the elite of Peharsar held prominent positions in the society and administration of the area from being Vazirs to the Maharaja, to holding high offices under the British.

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