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Iran's sex-change operations

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Iran's sex change operations

By Frances Harrison

The BBC's Tehran correspondent

Clerics can study transsexuality but not homosexuality which is illegal in Iran

In a country that has outlawed homosexuality, Frances Harrison meets one Iranian cleric who says the right to a sex change is a human right.

For 20 years Mahyar has been a woman trapped in a man's body.

As a small child Mahyar liked dressing up in women's clothes and experimenting with make-up but as she grew older it got more difficult. "I badly needed to do it but it had to be in secret," she says.

Now she wants to have a sex-change operation - if she can muster the £2,000 it will cost in Iran. If her family doesn't help financially, she says she might sell one of her kidneys to pay for it.

"People say you'll get other illnesses but I think I can live without one kidney. I cannot live between the sky and the earth," says Mahyar.

Locked-up

Surgeons have already removed Mahyar's testicles. After the operation, her older brother locked her up for a week and wouldn't let her use the telephone. Mahyar's brother says someone has put a spell on her.

When Mahyar wants to feel normal she goes to the clinic of Dr Mirjalali - Iran's leading sex-change surgeon. There are women who were men, men who were women and those like Mahyar waiting for the operation they believe will be a sort of rebirth.

Dr Mirjalali discusses the operation with Mayhar

Dr Mirjalali says in Europe a surgeon would do about 40 sex change operations in a decade. He's done 320 in the last 12 years in Iran.

"If you saw them out in the street you wouldn't realise that one day they were the opposite sex," he boasts.

The doctor will use parts of Mahyar's intestines to create female sex organs. He warns it involves five or six hours of difficult surgery and weeks of painful recuperation.

Mahyar loves to go to cosmetics shops - and try out new nail varnish for her long manicured nails and discuss with the amused female shop assistants the best sort of foundation cream to hide her stubbly chin.

I want to suggest that the right of transsexuals to change their gender is a human right

Hojatulislam Kariminia

Cleric

The sight of a man wearing make up does turn heads on the street. Islamic tradition does not allow cross dressing - a man should only dress in male clothes. But that is not to say Iran's religious scholars are antagonistic to transsexuals.

Hojatulislam Kariminia wrote his doctoral thesis on the implications of sex-change operations for Islamic law.

He is a leading expert on questions like does a husband or wife need the permission of their spouse before a sex change operation? Is their marriage automatically annulled afterwards and what happens to the wife's dowry money or inheritance if she becomes a man.

Ayatollah Khomeini

He shows me the book in Arabic in which, 41 years ago, Ayatollah Khomeini wrote about new medical issues like transsexuality.

"I believe he was the first Islamic scientist in the world of Islam who raised the issue of sex change," says Hojatulislam Kariminia.

The Ayatollah's ruling that sex-change operations were allowed has been reconfirmed by Iran's current spiritual leader.

That has meant that clerics like Hojatulislam Kariminia can study transsexuality - unlike homosexuality which is completely forbidden in Islam and illegal in Iran.

"I want to suggest that the right of transsexuals to change their gender is a human right," says the cleric, who is so fascinated by the subject that he says he dreams about the transsexuals he has studied at night.

"I am trying to introduce transsexuals to the people through my work and in fact remove the stigma or the insults that sometimes attach to these people," says Hojatulislam Kariminia.

Iranian society is not as accepting of transsexuals as the country's religious leaders

That's not easy. In every way Alan looks like a man but he was born Alim - with a woman's body. Three years ago he had a sex-change operation.

"I don't remember who Alim was - what she used to do, what kind of personality she had," says Alan. The past is something he'd prefer to forget.

Alan was about to get married when the parents of his bride found out he had been born a woman. They were horrified and refused to allow their daughter to marry what they considered another woman.

Iranian society has yet to catch up with its religious leaders - who say transsexuality is an illness like any other for which Islam has the solution and science the cure.

Alan shows me his new birth certificate and passport, which has been legally changed to say he is now a man. He's surprised to learn in Britain a transsexual who's had a sex change operation cannot change his or her gender on their birth certificate.

"I think in Iran it is better; in Iran they say you need to know your identity - either you have to be a boy or a girl," says Alan.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Frances Harrison's film will be screened on Thursday, 6 January, 2005.

Newsnight is broadcast on BBC Two at 1030pm every weeknight in the UK.

You can also watch the show from Newsnight's website, either live or on demand for 24 hours after originally broadcast, by clicking on the Watch Newsnight button

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Salaam alaikum,

We have had discussions on this topic before. Do a search on transexual and you will find several fatwas from different marjas.

WaSalaam, Hajar

PS: We have two topics today with this subject. I am merging them.

Edited by Hajar

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what about hamaphrodites...they sometimes have to

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Now in the case of a hamaphrodie then I can understand 100% but for people doing it so they can indulge in homosexual acts then I think that is disguisting and deceitful. Just my opinion and I am nobody so *shrugs*

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Iran's sex-change operations

By Frances Harrison

The BBC's Tehran correspondent

Clerics can study transsexuality but not homosexuality which is illegal in Iran

In a country that has outlawed homosexuality, Frances Harrison meets one Iranian cleric who says the right to a sex change is a human right.

For 20 years Mahyar has been a woman trapped in a man's body.

As a small child Mahyar liked dressing up in women's clothes and experimenting with make-up but as she grew older it got more difficult. "I badly needed to do it but it had to be in secret," she says.

Now she wants to have a sex-change operation - if she can muster the £2,000 it will cost in Iran. If her family doesn't help financially, she says she might sell one of her kidneys to pay for it.

"People say you'll get other illnesses but I think I can live without one kidney. I cannot live between the sky and the earth," says Mahyar.

Locked-up

Surgeons have already removed Mahyar's testicles. After the operation, her older brother locked her up for a week and wouldn't let her use the telephone. Mahyar's brother says someone has put a spell on her.

When Mahyar wants to feel normal she goes to the clinic of Dr Mirjalali - Iran's leading sex-change surgeon. There are women who were men, men who were women and those like Mahyar waiting for the operation they believe will be a sort of rebirth.

Dr Mirjalali discusses the operation with Mayhar

Dr Mirjalali says in Europe a surgeon would do about 40 sex change operations in a decade. He's done 320 in the last 12 years in Iran.

"If you saw them out in the street you wouldn't realise that one day they were the opposite sex," he boasts.

The doctor will use parts of Mahyar's intestines to create female sex organs. He warns it involves five or six hours of difficult surgery and weeks of painful recuperation.

Mahyar loves to go to cosmetics shops - and try out new nail varnish for her long manicured nails and discuss with the amused female shop assistants the best sort of foundation cream to hide her stubbly chin.

I want to suggest that the right of transsexuals to change their gender is a human right

Hojatulislam Kariminia

Cleric

The sight of a man wearing make-up does turn heads on the street. Islamic tradition does not allow cross dressing - a man should only dress in male clothes. But that is not to say Iran's religious scholars are antagonistic to transsexuals.

Hojatulislam Kariminia wrote his doctoral thesis on the implications of sex-change operations for Islamic law.

He is a leading expert on questions like does a husband or wife need the permission of their spouse before a sex change operation? Is their marriage automatically annulled afterwards and what happens to the wife's dowry money or inheritance if she becomes a man.

Ayatollah Khomeini

He shows me the book in Arabic in which, 41 years ago, Ayatollah Khomeini wrote about new medical issues like transsexuality.

"I believe he was the first Islamic scientist in the world of Islam who raised the issue of sex change," says Hojatulislam Kariminia.

The Ayatollah's ruling that sex-change operations were allowed has been reconfirmed by Iran's current spiritual leader.

That has meant that clerics like Hojatulislam Kariminia can study transsexuality - unlike homosexuality which is completely forbidden in Islam and illegal in Iran.

"I want to suggest that the right of transsexuals to change their gender is a human right," says the cleric, who is so fascinated by the subject that he says he dreams about the transsexuals he has studied at night.

"I am trying to introduce transsexuals to the people through my work and in fact remove the stigma or the insults that sometimes attach to these people," says Hojatulislam Kariminia.

Iranian society is not as accepting of transsexuals as the country's religious leaders

That's not easy. In every way Alan looks like a man but he was born Alim - with a woman's body. Three years ago he had a sex-change operation.

"I don't remember who Alim was - what she used to do, what kind of personality she had," says Alan. The past is something he'd prefer to forget.

Alan was about to get married when the parents of his bride found out he had been born a woman. They were horrified and refused to allow their daughter to marry what they considered another woman.

Iranian society has yet to catch up with its religious leaders - who say transsexuality is an illness like any other for which Islam has the solution and science the cure.

Alan shows me his new birth certificate and passport, which has been legally changed to say he is now a man. He's surprised to learn in Britain a transsexual who's had a sex change operation cannot change his or her gender on their birth certificate.

"I think in Iran it is better; in Iran they say you need to know your identity - either you have to be a boy or a girl," says Alan.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Gender Recognition Act 2004 comes into force in the UK in from April 2005. Under the provisions of the Act a transsexual person can apply to be legally recognised in their acquired gender.

Click here to visit the Dept for Constitutional Affairs website for more information about the Gender Recognition Act

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Frances Harrison's film will be screened on Thursday, 6 January, 2005.

Newsnight is broadcast on BBC Two at 1030pm every weeknight in the UK.

You can also watch the show from Newsnight's website, either live or on demand for 24 hours after originally broadcast, by clicking on the Watch Newsnight button

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I don't think you should be so quick to judge it. I don't agree with it but I don't know that much about it anyway, I just assumed it wouldn't be allowed in Islam anyway. We should at least listen to what Ayatollah Khomeini exactly said. I think someone posted it... although I still don't agree with it. If we can all start changing such a fundamental thing about ourselves it can't be good for society, especially since the men who want to change into women seem to be basing their desire for a sex-change on the fact that they liked playing with make-up and dresses when they were kids, so it's all because of social stereotypes which needn't even be in force anyway.

Another point. Like men don't control everything in the world, abusing and oppressing women for centuries (and don't bother saying Allah controls everything, I know that, and you know what I mean so don't be pedantic), they still aren't happy with that, they have to be able to BE women! It makes me so angry! :mad:

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(salam)

(bismillah)

That's gross... even if it is allowed by our maraja'.  :sick:

Khoda Hafez va Eltemas-e Dua!

Ali  @)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

(salam)

Bro, I used to think like that until I did some psychology units at uni. Thing is gender is not as simple as man and woman. 1 in 100 births, there is some confusion in gender, because of hormone imbalances and stuff. There are even cases of children having the appearance of girls, but were really boys and at puberty the drive in hormones causes the appearance of male organs. So some people may just be born that way....they literally feel the opposite gender. Its psychological and many times has its basis in science so I literally applaud the scholars for having the insight even from 40 years back to understand this issue.

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I literally applaud the scholars for having the insight even from 40 years back to understand this issue.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah, whether I agree with the rulings or not, I think it's commendable that they addressed the issue.

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what about hamaphrodites...they sometimes have to

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

From what I can recall (from threads posted here):

Sayyid Khoei (qas) considered it lawful for hermaphrodites to undergo a sex-change operation, but it isn't allowed for gays/lesbians.

Sayyid Khamenei' considers it lawful even for normal males/females (this is just what I could recall, so need to verify it.)

Edited by Peer

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There's another thread on this so I'll just post what i posted here too:

I used to think like that until I did some psychology units at uni. Thing is gender is not as simple as man and woman. 1 in 100 births, there is some confusion in gender, because of hormone imbalances and stuff. There are even cases of children having the appearance of girls, but were really boys and at puberty the drive in hormones causes the appearance of male organs. So some people may just be born that way....they literally feel the opposite gender. Its psychological and many times has its basis in science so I literally applaud the scholars for having the insight even from 40 years back to understand this issue.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

My wife has a masters in psychology. Those things you have spoken about are all THEORIES and not facts at all. Theories that not all psychologies agree with I might add. Psychology like every other western science is extremely flawd.

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Sayyid Khamenei' considers it lawful even for normal males/females (this is just what I could recall, so need to verify it.)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Salaam alaikum,

No he doesn't allow it for normal people. It's for people who are male or female on the outside, but the other gender in reality. By that I mean they are not physically the gender they should be.

WaSalaam, Hajar

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Guest abaleada   
Guest abaleada

(bismillah)

(salam)

The ways in which we Muslims react to issues that emotionally impact us will almost always reflect on Islam to non-Muslims, and even to Muslims. I have learned this. The hard way.

Please read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atypical_gender_identities and http://www.gender.org.uk/about/04embryo/42_gnerr.htm. Gender is not as simple a matter as many of us asume, especially in today's world of chemical, noise, and light pollution.

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Its not only men changing to be women, its women also changing to be men.

It is regarded as an illness, now whether it is a mental illness or otherwise, and whether the best cure is a psycological one or a physical one. I think in the absence of a psycological cure, the next best thing is having a physical operation to cure the illness. It is better to cure it then let it turn into something that could have been avoided.

"Iranian society has yet to catch up with its religious leaders - who say transsexuality is an illness like any other for which Islam has the solution and science the cure."

I prefer these people are treated.

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This is a link to the tv programme,

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsa/n5ctrl/tvseq/ne...t/newsnight.ram

it can be seen at 34mins..

Is it true this was Ayatollah Khomeini's view.

http://www.the-sisterhood.net/transsexuala...ordan/id12.html

The Transexual Alliance of the Kingdom of Jordan.. i cannot below what i am reading...

Cairo (AFP) from the Jordan Times, November 12, 1995.

Seven years after throwing out a medical student who changed from a man to a woman, Al Azhar, the highest Sunni Islam authority in Egypt, has permitted transsexuality under some conditions.

"A man can undergo an operation to become a woman and a woman can do the reverse if a doctor deems the intervention necessary to bring out signs of femininity or masculinity which are present but hidden" a new fatwa or religious decision said.

"Since 1988 around 20 sex change cases have been registered in Egypt. Most of them involve men who become women," the head of the civil status bureau, Ibrahim Beseila, told AFP.

Sex change operations are authorized by Egypt's doctors' union "but are done quietly due to the sarcasm they raise fro the public" a union source said.

Sayed Abdullah, the first known case in Egypt, ran into more than just sneers. Al Azhar University threw him out of its medical school in 1988 after he underwent the operation and emerged Sali Abdullah.

At the time the university condemned the transsexual as a "disgusting imitation of a woman forbidden by Islam".

An administrative court later overturned the university's ruling and ordered Sali placed in Al Azhar's medical school for women.

But Sali had no problem in avoiding military service, required only for men in Egypt. She also succeeded in changing her identity card after a surprised ministry of interior committee assigned with reviewing changes in the document called in doctors to testify to the first-ever change in the 'sex' category of the card.

Sali also married after working as a belly dancer in a Cairo cabaret where she attracted numerous clients, not to mention the interest of the press in which her photo was everywhere.

But Sali turned down an interview with AFP, saying, 'My husband is jealous and has forbidden me to speak to the press. I obey him to preserve our happiness.'

The instant press interest the revealed transsexual raises has apparently given ideas to men looking to get out of their military service and women wanting more than their half-share of inheritances.

'Once a farmer arrived in a niqab (a veil that completely covers the face) and speaking in a feminine voice. He didn't expect to be examined by doctors who confirmed that he was male,' Biseilla said.

.c The Associated Press

CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - Under Islamic law, a male heir inherits twice the amount that a female does. So what happens if one of the heirs has had a sex-change operation?

The son of a deceased millionaire recently asked the Alexandria personal statute court to limit his brother to a half share of his father's estate on grounds the brother had undergone an operation to become a woman, Al-Akhbar newspaper reported Sunday.

The court ruled that the brother was entitled to a full share since he didn't have the operation until after his father's death.

Edited by MustafaAlSadr

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Guest newshia   
Guest newshia
I don't think you should be so quick to judge it. I don't agree with it but I don't know that much about it anyway, I just assumed it wouldn't be allowed in Islam anyway. We should at least listen to what Ayatollah Khomeini exactly said. I think someone posted it... although I still don't agree with it. If we can all start changing such a fundamental thing about ourselves it can't be good for society, especially since the men who want to change into women seem to be basing their desire for a sex-change on the fact that they liked playing with make-up and dresses when they were kids, so it's all because of social stereotypes which needn't even be in force anyway.

Another point. Like men don't control everything in the world, abusing and oppressing women for centuries (and don't bother saying Allah controls everything, I know that, and you know what I mean so don't be pedantic), they still aren't happy with that, they have to be able to BE women! It makes me so angry!  :mad:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What are you raving about? These people have lived their lives literally feeling like the other gender; it is more than just some sick fantasy, it is their reality. Some of them even have both genitalia (or most even). It is surely more than just games; it is a serious issue. They are unfortunate people who receive some relief through these good doctors.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

This has already been clarified in some other post. I hope someone can clarify it again because I don't have much time.

wassalam

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Salam,

I know very little about this issue, but I’d like to share my opinion. I think we should abandon our stereotypes and let science decide whether this condition is from nature or otherwise. If such people are living in the wrong body, as freaks of nature, then this is a human rights issue. Islam is an optimistic and forward-looking religion that does not wish hardship for it follows. So if our scientists and scholars have understood this to be a medical condition then tran-sexuality may indeed be compatible with Islam and it would be good to see that Iran is treating such people as medical patients rather than social outcasts. Slightely relevant - did you know that some species of frog change sex? Back to humans, there is apparently a human medical condition called Hermaphroditism (a term referring to being of both sexes or intersexual) which I found from google, if anyone is interested:

http://www.shands.org/health/information/article/001669.htm

I also found a relevant article, (though New York Times – FYI):

From humangay at nethere.com Mon Aug 2 13:15:03 2004

From: humangay at nethere.com (Ed B.)

Date: Fri Aug 27 12:50:32 2004

Subject: [bGILT-News] As Repression Lifts, More Iranians Change Their Sex

Message-ID: <410E758D.3010202@nethere.com>

From The New York Times:

As Repression Lifts, More Iranians Change Their Sex

By NAZILA FATHI

Published: August 2, 2004

EHRAN, Aug. 1 - Everything about Amir appears masculine: his broad

chest, muscled arms, the dark full beard and deep voice. But, in fact,

Amir was a woman until four years ago, when, at the age of 25, he

underwent the first of a series of operations that would change his life.

Since then he has had 20 surgical procedures and expects another 4. And

Amir, who as a woman was married twice to men - his second husband

helped with the transition and remains a good friend - is now engaged to

marry a woman.

"I love my life and I'm happy, as long as no one knows about my past

identity," said Amir, who asked that his full name not be published. "No

one has been more helpful than the judge, who was a cleric and issued

the permit for my operation."

After decades of repression, the Islamic government is recognizing that

some people want to change their sex, and allowing them to have

operations and obtain new birth certificates.

Before the Islamic Revolution in 1979, there was no particular policy

regarding transsexuals. Iranians with the inclination, means and

connections could obtain the necessary medical treatment and new

identity documents. The new religious government, however, classed

transsexuals and transvestites with gays and lesbians, who were

condemned by Islam and faced the punishment of lashing under Iran's

penal code.

But these days, Iran's Muslim clerics, who dominate the judiciary, are

considerably better informed about transsexuality. Some clerics now even

recommend sex-change operations to those who are troubled about their

gender. The issue was discussed at a conference in Tehran in June that

drew officials from other Persian Gulf countries.

One cleric, Muhammad Mehdi Kariminia, is writing his thesis on

transsexuality at the religious seminary of Qum.

"All the clerics and researchers at the seminary encouraged me to work

on the subject," he said in an interview. "They said that my research

can help change the social stigma attached to these people and clarify

religious decrees on the matter."

One early campaigner for transsexual rights is Maryam Hatoon Molkara,

who was formerly a man known as Fereydoon. Before the revolution, under

the shah, he had longed to become a woman but could not afford surgery.

Furthermore, he wanted religious guidance. In 1978, he wrote to

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who was to become the leader of the

revolution but was still in exile, explaining his situation.

The ayatollah replied that his case was different from that of a

homosexual and therefore he had his blessing.

However, the revolution intervened and men like himself or those who had

already changed their sex were harassed, even jailed and tortured. "They

made me stop wearing women's clothes, which I had worn for many years

and was used to," Ms. Molkara recalled. "It was like torture for me.

They even made me take hormones to look like a man.''

It took him eight years after the revolution, in 1986, to get government

permission to proceed with surgery. But he could not afford the surgery

and did not have it until 1997, when he underwent a sex-change operation

in Bangkok. The Iranian government covered the expenses. Four years ago,

Ms. Molkara established an organization to help those with

gender-identity problems. Co-founders include Ali Razini, head of the

Special Court of Clergy, a branch of the judiciary that only deals with

clerics, and Zahra Shojai, Iran's vice president for women's affairs. An

Islamic philanthropic group known as the Imam Khomeini Charity

Foundation has agreed to provide loans equivalent to about $1,200 to

help pay for sex-change surgery.

To obtain legal permission for sex-change operations and new birth

certificates, applicants must provide medical proof of gender-identity

disorder. The process can take years.

It also involves considerable expense. In Tehran, the initial

male-to-female surgery runs about $4,000. So far, Amir has spent $12,000

on medical procedures.

The people who pursue this route come from many different backgrounds.

Dr. Bahram Mir-djalali, one of Tehran's few sex-reassignment surgeons,

said one of his patients had been a member of the Revolutionary Guards

who served five years in the war with Iraq. His operation was paid for

by a Muslim cleric he had worked for as a secretary. After the surgery,

the man-turned-woman divorced, and then married the cleric.

"When she came to see me years later, she was wearing a chador," the

doctor recalled, referring to the black head-to-toe garb worn by

religious women. "She took off the chador, and there was no sign of the

bearded man I had operated on."

But many who cannot deal with the legal and financial obstacles to a

surgical solution have to deal with humiliation in their daily lives.

One 27-year-old man said he ran away from home at the age of 14 because

he did not dare tell his family of his urge to become a woman. He wants

to be known as Susan and wears women's clothes at home but only emerges

dressed that way at night. He says the constant need for secrecy has

left him severely depressed, and he has attempted suicide several times.

"I have suffered all my life,'' he said, constantly adjusting his long

curly hair to cover his sideburns. "People treat me as though I have

come from Mars. Women pull my hair and laugh at me on the street. Most

men I am attracted to reject me."

In a society where men enjoy a higher status than women, the stigma

against any man who wants to be a woman is especially strong.

"They compliment a girl who behaves and dresses like a man as a strong

person, but they look down at us and despise us," said Assal, who was

disowned by her father for having surgery to become a woman.

Dr. Mir-djalali said he had to fight on many fronts to help more than

200 patients who had consulted him in the 12 years he had performed

sex-change operations. Even if Iran's Muslim clerics are more

understanding now of transsexuals' needs, others lag behind.

"We have a problem even deciding at which hospital to do the surgery

because society considers these people deviant," he said. "Hospital

officials have reacted negatively because they say other patients do not

like the looks of my patients."

He said one patient's father pulled a knife on him in his office, and

threatened to kill him if he touched his son. "What we really need to

help these people,'' Dr. Mir-djalali said, "is a serious cultural campaign."

http://lists.uua.org/pipermail/bgilt-news/2004-August.txt

Edited by MajiC

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What are you raving about? These people have lived their lives literally feeling like the other gender; it is more than just some sick fantasy, it is their reality. Some of them even have both genitalia (or most even). It is surely more than just games; it is a serious issue. They are unfortunate people who receive some relief through these good doctors

This is wrong. Is this a view of all Usulis or just the ones who do Taqleed on Seyed Khomeini and Seyed Khamein'i? Are there Usuli Marjias who have Fatwas against this?

Allah has made men and women. Allah made Men with the proper organs and the proper Islamic Lifestyle. Allah made women with the proper organs and the proper Islamic Lifestyle. To try and change this is to try and change what Allah has given you. Its wrong.

This is the problem with Usulis. Their Marjias are changing Islamic Law as they see fit. Shariah can not be changed. The right to decide on these issues is the right of only The 14 Mansoom(pbut).

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  Allah has made men and women. Allah made Men with the proper organs and the proper Islamic Lifestyle. Allah made women with the proper organs and the proper Islamic Lifestyle. To try and change this is to try and change what Allah has given you. Its wrong.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Salam,

The issue here is not whether intersexuality complies with the natural order of things - of course it is not natural in that sense. The point is whether intersexuality is a persons fantasy/desire or a genuine medical condition beyond merely a personal preference. If the latter is the case then the issue is more complicated.

Your argument also entails that since Allah (swt) ordained a specific order then anything unique would therefore constitute deviation and sin. I think this is the case only with free-will. In fact there are many biologial defections or medical conditions which by definition do not conform to the natural order of things, but is this deviation on the part of the subject if beyond his or her power? No, especially if there currently is no cure for it.

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Salam Alaikoum...

That is disturbing, sad and unimaginable!

I still don't understand how these people develop their sexual orientation. I refuse to believe that God would create people with this illness from birth - or perhaps He may have. I just feel bad for them, yet at the same time it makes me angry (incase where it is or was in their hands to control it) that they would choose to change their gender.

May Allah help and guide all the needy.

wa/salam

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    • @Fakeha Not sure what your problem is. Can you please explain more?
    • Quran says: "it is no wrong for a Momin to keep the wish to marry a woman but do not keep secret friendship". 1st point allows to wish for marriage and wish comes when you want some person to be with you and that's love. 2nd point forbids from girl friend / boy friend relationship.  @Waseem162 and @Islandsandmirrors Make peace 
    • Allow me to go through the thought process with you,   So there is a universe with a huge complexity in it, it seems you want to know where and how it came into existence. We know it came, and there was nothing before it so if God created the Universe then how did he come/exist prior to something that wasn't there? Scientifically, space and time are bound, if you live in space you are bound by time, but time isn't absolute so it would be very much possible that if you were of no matter at all and 'existed' outside the realm of space then time isn't something that applies for you. The best way I imagine it is as imagine a train travelling across the earth, the universe is that train, it is moving and the movement is time, everything outside the train, the earth itself is 'God' he can see the train move but doesn't matter where it moves it is still within his grasp, it makes no difference it's position to his existence, he is just there. So due to space-time link, it is very much possible for God to exist given his nature which is thoroughly explained in the Quran. Now how can I be so sure God created the Universe? Think about the laws of the Universe. They are absolute and doesn't matter where you are, you cannot change them, e.g. you cannot destroy or create matter for example. And before your atheist friends attack you with this, you can change some things like the boiling point of water for example, but that isn't one of the natural laws that's just a property. So for the Universe to exist something had to happen, a reaction, matter + anti-matter, blast of energy whatever you want you can choose. However, whatever it was it would have to still follow a set of rules, like for matter and anti-matter to react, there are laws of nature that dictate they will react. So where did the foundation rules of the Universe come from? If there was nothing prior how could they have existed? All you need to do it look into the complexity of nature and you will know something is up. Now here's an 'offence' question for you, if God doesn't exist wouldn't it be all about survival then? Why don't we look up to thieves, rapists, murderers etc. who live only for themselves? they are going to disappear into a void at the end of life, so no matter what you do it has no impact and you will never feel anybody else's pain because you can't switch bodies, no accountability so why don't we go mad? even better, why don't we all just commit suicide? If your life is a struggle and you're not rich enjoying all the pleasures of the world, it would make perfect sense to just kill all ourselves. But what about life and experiencing it? Well, it makes no difference whether you lived 1 year or 100 years if it is all going to perish. Imagine I told you to build a castle as glorious as you can, once you're done I will destroy it all, would you bother? If you knew it will perish immediately is there a point? Would you buy a house if you knew it would be knocked down? Nope, so why invest time and pain into a life that will soon terminate and you don't even know when! Plus nobody can argue with you about morality because it would have no foundation, seize to exist if there is no 'purpose' for anything. This is the reality of the atheist position it, to me seems a lot worse than one with hope in something greater.  So as a challenge, can you prove to me it is bad to kill someone I don't like if I knew I would never be caught, punished or held accountable? Although there are many more points, I will leave it there. for the time being.
    • When the ground is slippery,the chances of slipping increase exponentially. Although Ahle kitab i.e Christians,Jews etc are pak according to Ayatollah Sistani.(But you cannot eat meat cooked by them unless you are sure that it is halal) http://www.sistani.org/english/qa/01120/ If you can find another place to live then it is better for you else you can check the above link and act accordingly.If you feel that you will fall in to sinning that you MUST look for other accomodations.  
    • That's the point. That there wasn't anything for his enemies to say that you were weak before how could you now say that you are a Prophet while it can be your obsession right now. But those people took those things seriously. They took it serious and you yourself admitted that none can be like him in this present age and now you believe that he wasn't ordinary but extraordinary. You seem to reject your views bro and that's a good sign. You think that God is not wise to let loopholes in prophethood that anyone may come and claim in such way?  You should learn the story of Hazrat Ibrahim a.s who said that weak is not God while implying towards setting sun, moon and heavenly bodies. No one could pass the seive of Prophet and Imamate except those who are Prophets and Imams. Anyone who does so will be humiliated and die a miserable life.  The weaknesses which sunni aqeedah has let Ghulam Ahmed to claim Prophethood and Imamate. While he failed in the infallibility test of shia faith. If anyone who turns back from shia belief to claim imamate, he would seek help from sunni aqeedah because shia aqeedah cannot be tempered or violated.   
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