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Vitamin D deficiency and Muslim women

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*NOTE: this article is written in the washington post, therefore it is AMERICAN, so supplementation of milk refers to AMERICA, not necessarily other countries*

Vitamin D Appears to Cut Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

Reuters

Thursday, September 14, 2006; A02

People who take the recommended daily amount of Vitamin D are about half as likely to get deadly pancreatic cancer as people who do not, researchers said yesterday. Now they are checking to see if getting the vitamin from food or sunlight also cuts the risk.

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in the United States. This year, an estimated 32,000 new cases will be diagnosed, and only 5 percent of its victims will survive more than five years.

Working with colleagues at Harvard University, a team led by Halcyon Skinner of Northwestern University examined data from two large, long-term health surveys involving 46,771 men 40 to 75 years old and 75,427 women 38 to 65.

They found that people who took the U.S. recommended daily allowance of Vitamin D, 400 international units (IU), had a 43 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer. Those who took less than 150 IU per day had a 22 percent reduced risk.

Writing in the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, the researchers said taking more than 400 IU a day did not reduce the risk further.

Vitamin D is produced by the body when sunlight hits the skin, but most Americans do not get enough sunlight to produce the needed amount. Milk, both dairy and soy, is fortified with the vitamin. Some foods, including fish, eggs and liver, also contain Vitamin D.

© 2006 The Washington Post Company

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...1302018_pf.html

Edited by Cary Grant

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ws

in most parts of australia, the dairy products are not supplemented with vitamin D. It is only in places like the US were most of the milk is supplemented with about 200-400 U of vit D per serving. Dairy food itself does not have high vit D levels normally.

If you want to up your vit D my advice is either to increase your sun exposure (ie the amount of your body exposed) before 10 am and after 2-3 pm for about 10-20 min. It wouldnt be a bad idea to get vit D tablets, such as osteovit-D, I have posted a pic of the product a few posts above.

I dont know. I would have to look it up. Best to ask your doc this question.

The doctor must have had some reason to check your vit D, it is not something routine that they do. Unless this particular doctor thought to throw it in with your routine blood tests since you wear hijab and are more likely to have vit D deficiency, since less of your body is exposed to the sun and our lifestyles since the industrial revolution have basically reduced our exposure to the sun.

right i just checked out your posts and realised that youre in melbourne. In melbourne, because they get less of the decent sunlight there, and vit D deficiency is more prevalent, they have milk that is vit D supplemented. Im sure you can find them in safeway. I also know that they sell Osteovit-D in Melbourne. You should be able to find it at most pharmacies.

Im surprised that although your vit D is below normal, your doc didnt suggest any remedy. Particularly since the test itself is not routine.

Unfortunately I have had to shop for a new GP. The GP I am now seeing is a Muslimah so I feel comfortable seeing her. Unfortunately I'm not feeling too confident in her doctoring abilities. Anyway...

I have found cheese in Melbourne that has added Vitamin D - and I will definately look out for the milk. I really don't want to take tablets. Perhaps I will see how I go in 6 months time, get my level re-checked, and then perhaps look at supliments. :cry:

Thank you so much for your response. May Allah reward you for your efforts.

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Don't see this as something to be upset about. Be happy that you have this opportunity to better understand it. An entire nation (America) has supplemented their milk because vitamin D deficiency is such a problem. And even with these sorts of measures, it still remains as a nation wide problem (see for example the article from the washington post).

Vitamin D deficiency does not just effect women who wear hijab, but generally people who spend the majority of their time indoors, the fact that muslim women cover most of their bodies just reduces the surface area that is exposed in the relatively little time they are outdoors. Vitamin D deficiency really became prevalent with the industrial revolution, where alot of the jobs created were now indoors in factories and offices and residences were more compact, with fewer yards or outside areas where people would just sit or work for long periods of time.

I dont quite understand why you want to see a muslimah as a doctor. I can understand that it helps having someone who understands the religious beliefs that you follow in your life, but youre seeing a doctor for their knowledge and abilities in the field of medicine, not so they can be your friend.

I say this with experience. I used to see a muslim female doctor myself, and stopped seeing her shortly after she responded to my request for a blood test for vit D with "well you wear alot of black, and black absorbs the sunlight, so you shouldnt have any trouble with vitamin D". Now I cannot tell you how flabbergasted I was. Not only was she not aware of the whole greater risk of vitamin D def due to lifestyle, but she had a notion that was so completely and utterly wrong.

In fact black clothes absorb the UV light responsible for facilitating the production of vit D in the body into the fabric, and prevent it from reaching the skin.

I will say one thing in her favour though, she was humble enough to ask for the reading material I had and wanted to read up about it.

I don't know why you regard the tablets with such disdain. You have supplemented foods, you might as well just have the proper dosage to correct your low Vit D without trying to get it through foods (that you shouldnt be having too much of anyway) which have supplements in them.

the suggested daily dosage for someone with low vitamin D or at high risk of it (according to most of the literature I have read) is to take about 1000 international units (IU)** (see below) of vitamin D a day. That is how much one tablet or capsule of vitamin D has in the products available in Australia today. In Australia right now we have two supplements of vitamin D, both of which can be purchased over the counter. One is Ostelin which is vit D2 in a bovine gelatine capsule. And the other is osteovit-D, which is a tablet of vit D3.

I recommend the osteovit-D (about 11-15 dollars for 90 tablets), it is what got my vit D well into normal range. It is made from the more biologically active form of vit D, it doesnt come in a gelatine capsule, and I believe it is cheaper than Ostelin too.

I say, find a female doctor you are comfortable with but also confident of their skills and knowledge and discuss your concerns with them.

_____

**Ok i had to add this as an after note. You see its been a little over 2 years that I have done any reading in this field. Towards the end of my reading about 2 years ago, the prominent people in this field were saying that 1000 IU a day was not enough (for the vit D deficient), though some studies in the past had come to this conclusion. They were even trying to get the government to approve the more wider use of vit D injections, so that a large dosage could be given intramuscularly to correct the deficiency. From what I know, Prof. Diamond in Sydney was giving women injections of much higher dosages of vit D to correct their deficiencies.

After a few studies here in Australia (as well as other studies in other parts of the world), they now believe that you need far more than 1000 IU a day to correct vit D levels in people with low vit D. I strongly suggest you consult your doctor if you decide to take the tablets as a supplement, but just taking one 1000 IU tablet a day may not be enough for some people to correct their deficiency. They may need two a day, or more, for a short period of time, like a month.. (or more). Discuss this with your doctor.

also you might find this article an interesting read:

http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/182_06...ia10848_fm.html

it is an article concentrating more on australia and newzealand. it also talks about vit D toxicity. Reading it may alleviate some of your fears I hope.

Edited by Cary Grant

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ok i dont quite understand why you want to see a muslimah as a doctor. I can understand that it helps having someone who understands the religious beliefs that you follow in your life, but youre seeing a doctor for their knowledge and abilities in the field of medicine, not so they can be your friend.

I say this with experience. I used to see a muslim female doctor myself, and stopped seeing her shortly after she responded to my request for a blood test for vit D with "well you wear alot of black, and black absorbs the sunlight, so you shouldnt have any trouble with vitamin D". Now I cannot tell you how flabbergasted I was. Not only was she not aware of the whole greater risk of vitamin D def due to lifestyle, but she had a notion that was so completely and utterly wrong.

In fact black clothes absorb the UV light responsible for facilitating the production of vit D in the body into the fabric, and prevent it from reaching the skin.

I will say one thing in her favour though, she was humble enough to ask for the reading material I had and wanted to read up about it.

I don't know why you regard the tablets with such disdain. You have supplemented foods, you might as well just have the proper dosage to correct your low Vit D without trying to get it through foods (that you shouldnt be having too much of anyway) which have supplements in them.

the suggested daily dosage for someone with low vitamin D or at high risk of it (according to most of the literature I have read) is to take about 1000 internation units (IU) of vitamin D a day. That is how much one tablet or capsule of vitamin D has in the products available in Australia today. In Australia right now we have two supplements of vitamin D, both of which can be purchased over the counter. One is Ostelin which is vit D2 in a bovine gelatine capsule. And the other is osteovit-D, which is a tablet of vit D3.

I recommend the osteovit-D (about 11-15 dollars for 90 tablets), it is what got my vit D well into normal range. It is made from the more biologically active form of vit D, it doesnt come in a gelative capsule, and I believe it is cheaper than Ostelin too.

I say, find a female doctor you are comfortable with but also confident of their skills and knowledge and discuss your concerns with them.

I had a preference for a Muslimah doctor - and have only seen this one twice, but it's not something I am set on sticking with. Don't worry, I will be continuing my quest for a good GP.

Thank you for the info - I think it is best that I find a more competent doctor and then discuss this further with her. You are right, it is odd that the doctor I am seeing now didn't want to do anything about it.

Thanks again for your help.

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lol i made quite a few changes to that post after you replied to it. u may want to have another look at it. that is if you can be btohered to read through it all. i have added an article that you might like to read at the end.

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Asalmaolikum..

what the fuss is all about down here upon vit d deficiency...can anyone tell me in one sentence...i am here after a long absence ...how is everyone..if anyone remebers me still do reply...heheheeh..

Allah hafiz...

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Vitamin D deficiency alert

One in four Australians risk long-term health problems

By Gabrielle Babbington

At least one in four Australians is at risk of long-term health problems due to suboptimal vitamin D levels, experts warn

Professor Mark Wahlqvist, director of the Asia Pacific Health and Nutrition Centre at Melbourne’s Monash University, said vitamin D deficiency was not limited to known at-risk groups.

“I think we’re looking at a quarter of the population having suboptimal vitamin D levels, and maybe a whole lot more,” he said.

Evidence cited by the NHMRC in 2005 suggested about 30% of Australian adults were mildly deficient, with serum vitamin D levels below 50 nmol/L.

But Professor Wahlqvist said the long-term effects of even suboptimal vitamin D levels – below 70 nmol/L – were concerning.

“This is quite a major health problem in Australia – we will get a recurrence of rickets if we do not address it, but the bigger problem is increased disability in later life due to [increased risk of] cancer, multiple sclerosis and bone [disorders],” he said.

The role of vitamin D in mediating cell differentiation made it an important risk factor in cancer, Professor Wahlqvist said.

Vitamin D deficiency could also account for the increased prevalence of multiple sclerosis in areas with less sunlight, he said.

Professor John Eisman, staff endocrinologist at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney and director of the Bone and Mineral Research Program at the Garvan Institute, said it was very clear that suboptimal vitamin D levels affected large numbers in the community.

“With the wonderful work of the ‘Slip Slop Slap’ we have probably swung a little too far towards avoiding all sun exposure,” he said.***

“If our vitamin D levels get low enough the first thing we notice is proximal muscle weakness around the limb girdle – this may have effects on injurious falls.”

Professor Wahlqvist, who is also a consultant physician in general internal medicine, said he treated patients with vitamin D deficiency every week. They were referred with lethargy weakness, musculoskeletal and malabsorption disorders, as well as cardiovascular and endocrine conditions.

Some young male patients who worked in the IT industry and who were “wedded to their computers” had undetectable vitamin D levels, he said.

“We’ve reached the point where as part of history-taking for general health problems one ought to ask about sun exposure and dietary vitamin D intake, and if there is any suspicion on any of those fronts we should check the 25-hydroxy vitamin D and parathyroid hormone,” he said.

Experts agreed vitamin D fortification in foods could be a next-best approach to encouraging sun exposure, but its safety and viability were still unfolding. Professor Wahlqvist advised patients to take cod liver oil tablets and to regularly include in their diets milk fortified with vitamin D, fish, eggs and liver.

Australian Doctor December 1 2006, pg 1-2.

***It must be noted however, that sun exposure can also cause skin cancer, so it is wisest to get sun exposure during "safer" times such as before 10 am and after 3 pm.

Edited by Cary Grant

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http://www.abcnews.go.com/Health/CancerPre...6349&page=1

Vitamin D May Cut Cancer Risk

Researchers Say "Sunlight" Nutrient Cuts Risk Significantly; Skeptics Remain

By KAMAL MENGHRAJANI

ABC News Medical Unit

June 8, 2007—

Like many American women, Ivalynn Oudin has been taking supplements of calcium and vitamin D for years.

"My doctor said it would increase my bone density and help prevent hip fractures," said the 57-year-old mother of two.

But new research published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that vitamin D supplements may have another benefit: a 60 percent to 77 percent lower risk of cancer.

"Our study shows that with adequate vitamin D, cancer can be prevented -- or a high incidence of it can," said Joan Lappe, a professor of nursing and medicine at Creighton University and the lead author of the study.

"This is the first study that shows, in a clinical trial, that adequate levels of vitamin D can reduce the risk of cancer."

The research may already be impacting public health policy in at least one country. According to a release posted on its Web site, the Canadian Cancer Society is planning an announcement Friday that all adults should start taking vitamin D supplements. It's the first-ever move by a major public health organization to endorse daily use of the vitamin as a cancer-prevention therapy for an entire population.

However, critics of the study say this drastic drop in cancer risk is not borne out by previous research, and the effect may be much more subtle.

Dr. Jacques Rossouw of the National Institutes of Health is one of these critics. His group conducted a study that followed 36,282 postmenopausal women for seven years to test the effects of vitamin D on colorectal cancer, pegged by the NIH as the third leading cancer killer of women in the United States.

"In our study we found absolutely no indication of an effect of calcium or vitamin D [on cancer] -- zero," he said. "And that's over a seven-year period. It was a much larger study and much a longer study."

Dr. John Milner, chief of the Nutrition Science Research Group at the National Cancer Institute, agrees that some skepticism is necessary.

"We need to put this in the context of the entire diet and lifestyle and understand why we're getting some effect," Milner said. "I don't want to minimize it, but let's see a little bit more before we start jumping into public health policies."

The research was conducted with 1,179 postmenopausal Caucasian women older than the age of 55 who were randomly assigned to receive a placebo containing no medication, a dose of calcium equivalent to about five glasses of milk per day, or both calcium and a high dose of vitamin D.

Women who were on both calcium and vitamin D had 60 percent to 77 percent fewer incidences of cancer in four years than those taking the placebo, according to the study.

Salmon and Sunshine

Vitamins are substances that the body needs but cannot make entirely on its own. Although vitamin D can be found in oily fish, such as salmon, it is most commonly obtained by the body through exposure to sunlight; as the sun's rays hit the skin, the body converts a compound similar to cholesterol into vitamin D.

The body uses this vitamin D to maintain a healthy level of calcium in the blood and for proper bone health throughout life, according to Dr. Michael Holick, a vitamin D expert at Boston University Medical Center.

In the past 20 years, research has also suggested that vitamin D may play other roles within the body.

"We now recognize that every tissue and cell in the body [can use] vitamin D," Holick said. "Vitamin D tells cells to keep their growth in check and helps keep them from becoming [cancerous]."

Want More D? Head Outside

For those looking to get more vitamin D, Lappe suggests that they spend 10-15 minutes in the sun with their arms and legs exposed, after covering sensitive areas such as the face with sunscreen.

For Oudin, this is an easy recommendation to take.

"Great! My doctor told me I needed to walk, so I go outside and I walk without sunscreen on my arms or legs," she said. "I'm all for double duty."

Copyright © 2007 ABC News Internet Ventures

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200706/s1953678.htm

Last Update: Sunday, June 17, 2007. 10:45pm (AEST)

Aussies issued vitamin D guidelines

The Cancer Council has issued new guidelines to tell Australians how much sunlight they need to avoid vitamin D deficiency without increasing their risk of skin cancer.

New data shows many Australians are deliberately seeking sun exposure without protection because they are worried about vitamin D.

The Cancer Council says fair-skinned people can maintain adequate vitamin D levels in summer from a few minutes of exposure to sunlight on their hands, arms and face on either side of the peak UV index periods.

In winter, when UV radiation levels are less intense, people need about two or three hours of sunlight to the hands, arms or face over a week.

Those most at risk of a vitamin D deficiency are naturally dark-skinned people, who need more UV exposure.

People who cover their skin for cultural reasons and those who are housebound or in institutional care also face a high risk of deficiency.

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Al Salam

This is certainly weird ,

i was diagnosed with a chronic vitamin D deficiency along with high parathyroid hormone levels and decreased calcium levels. I was under research at CHEO for 2 years and was later transferred to long term care at an endrocronoglist which is where I get my monthly shot of vitamin D. I was diagnosed with pseudohypoparathyroidsm , and have been under treatment for about 4 -5 years now.

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Well Vitamin D supplementation in food has been challenged recently (see ref and abstract below), and this guy has a bit of a following as far as i could tell in the non-medical community. The funny thing is that no one seems to have responded to him in the scientific/medical literature.

Would have liked to look into this further, but alas, just havent been bothered.

Bioessays. 2008 Feb;30(2):173-82.

Vitamin D discovery outpaces FDA decision making.

Marshall TG.

School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University, Western Australia. trevor.m@autoimmunityresearch.org

The US FDA currently encourages the addition of vitamin D to milk and cereals, with the aim of reducing rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults. However, vitamin D not only regulates the expression of genes associated with calcium homeostasis, but also genes associated with cancers, autoimmune disease, and infection. It does this by controlling the activation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a type 1 nuclear receptor and DNA transcription factor. Molecular biology is rapidly coming to an understanding of the multiplicity of roles played by the VDR, but clinical medicine is having difficulty keeping up with the pace of change. For example, the FDA recently proposed a rule change that will encourage high levels of vitamin D to be added to even more foods, so that the manufacturers can claim those foods "reduce the risk of osteoporosis". The FDA docket does not review one single paper detailing the transcriptional activity of vitamin D, even though, on average, one new paper a day is being published on that topic. Nor do they review whether widespread supplementation with vitamin D, an immunomodulatory secosteroid, might predispose the population to immune dysfunction. This BioEssay explores how lifelong supplementation of the food chain with vitamin D might well be contributing to the current epidemics of obesity and chronic disease. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

So the moral of the story bimbos, mimbos and worms: dont self medicate, consult your doctor. Hopefully, they will know what theyre doing. you could print out the article and harrass the doc with it. :D

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(salam)

I was asked by a sister to post something in here on Vitamin D deficiency and women so I shall oblige. Recent studies, and experience have shows a prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in muslim women, and children born to muslim women. There is a study done in 2001 at the University of Chicago that looked at religious causes of Vitamin D deficiency in infants, and concluded as such. Additionally, a retort to this study was published by pediatricians at Wake Forest University, but with similar conclusions. For the Australians in the audience, a 2002 study conducted at the University of New South Wales also looked at muslim women with vitamin D deficiency with rather startling results, and lastly a 1996 study at the University of Malmo, Sweden, specifically highlighted Muslim women as a definite risk group for vitamin D deficiency.

Now before I go on, a little disclaimer. I should let you know that in medicine, sadly, race plays a big role in disease. An African American man with join ache, sickle cell disease, a Jewish smoker with blanched fingers, Buerger's disease, certain diseases are simply attributed to certain religioun groups and certain ethnic groups, thats just the way it is.

The reason quite simply for Vitamin D deficiency in Muslim women is lifestyle in more cases than not. Vitamin D as a fat soluble vitamin that is produced by the reaction of sunlight on skin. The sunlight converts 7-DHC to Vitamin D once it is exposed to certain receptors on the skin. However, there are a few misnomers about sunlight and specifically UV absorption. Contrary to popular beleif, black does not allow UV lights to pass thru. How does this fit in, well, black hijabs, or black chadors, or even black clothing does not allow UV light to pass thru and act on the skin and produce Vitamin D.

The role of Vitamin D in the body is to increase calcium absorption in the body, both in the abdominal region, and by the kidney. This absorbed calcium is then used to enhance bone in the body. Therefore it is easy to see why Vitamin D deficiency in children causes Ricketts, and in adults leads to Osteomalacia, both disorders of bone growth and structure. However, if all it did were to cause bone disorders we could take calcium tablets and be done with it. Sadly, the human body is not as simple. The problem with vitamin D is while it is also produced by UV reaction courtesy of the sun, Vitamin D is also activated in the kidney by the action of Parathyroid Hormone, (PTH) produced by the parathyroid.

Hormone regulation in the body works by a series of checks and balances, an increase in one, leads to a decrease in another and vice versa. Vitamin D produced by the kidney is not enough really for bone health. Therefore if we are sunlight deficient, and deficient in a diet of milk, butter and eggs, our body will compensate by producing PTH. Unfortunately as mentioned before, PTH cannot compensate enough, yet the body will continue churning it out, leading eventually to a state of hyperparathyroidism, and the slim chance of a parathyroid adenoma, aka a tumor, possible cancerous (worst case).

So the lesson is this. Please do get out more into the sunlight, please dont wear exclusively black (a little tricky in Muharram, but we can work around that), and do drink your daily requisite supply of milk, etc etc. I hope this is a good enough summary for the aforementioned sister, if not, please let me know and I shall ammend it and include any potential erratum that may exist. Thank you, stay healthy, ws

it is much easier to buy vitamin D pill you know they give you approximately 500 to 1000 IU. It is quite effeicient than other vitamins. They promise to keeps your organs save while vitamin D protects you from any disease what so ever.

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salam.

Vit D is such an issue, its my headache, been my headache for a long time. last yr i was highly defficient in Vit D, i was meant to be taking 2 tablets a day but was taking about 1 tablet a day which is 1000 IU coz im lazy andd forget when i have to take medicine. then i got pregnaant (still am) and i dun a test and im still defficient. The most important time to take Vit D is when your pregnant. I see a specialist that is really serious about my levels being normal becuase of many incidents of womens bones rupturing during child birth, and the rupturing of babies bones at birth due to the brittleness of the bones. i was stoked to hear that this happens due to lack of Vit d.

My specialist makes me take 3 1000 IU tablets eveyr morning. thats 3000 IU a day of Vit D, just so that i get enuf Vit D for me and my baby.

Take care of your selves sisters, nuthing is mmore important then good health.

Fee aman Allah

salam

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thank you hajje-fatme for sharing that. yes your situation is one of the reasons why i became relatively obsessed with this issue a while back.

Its important that the girls/women take careful note, because their lifestyle and outside dress may make them more likely to suffer from vitamin D deficiency and it MUST be something that is seen to under the guidance and supervision of a doctor/endocrinologist. not only will your health suffer, if you ignore low vit D levels, but the health of your child will be effected too.

anywho i wanted to add the full text of the article that challenged the supplementation of foods with vit D- for those who are interested and with some health/med/biochem background - but was unable to add it to my previous post. so here it is (see pdf file Marshall2008). I have also included the full text of the only reply to his article (Boucher2008), but it is only in response to him saying that looking at 25-OH(D) is not a good way to monitor vit D levels. I'm kinda disappointed I wanted some people to either bash him or agree with him.

Marshall2008.pdf

Boucher2008.pdf

Edited by Cary Grant

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Guest Peace

YES INDEED I have nothing of use to say except I AGREE with the learned, respected and sincerely devoted sister above !!!!!

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SALAM ALAIKUM SISTERS

I AM A NURSE

AND A REVERT TO ISLAM WITHIN THE PAST YEAR

I TAN PRIVATELY IN A SALON, AND I THINK THIS IS ONE WAY A MUSLIMAH CAN COMBAT THIS VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY PROBLEM

JUST A ONE MINUTE SESSION MAYBE TWICE A WEEK

IF YOU DONT WANT TO ADD COLOR

HOPE THIS IS NOT HARAM

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My skin absorbs tons of Vitamin D. Northern and Western Europeans are less likely to have Vitamin D deficiency because their skin naturally absorbs more sunlight anyways because there's less sun in those areas. Not something I worry about...

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My skin absorbs tons of Vitamin D. Northern and Western Europeans are less likely to have Vitamin D deficiency because their skin naturally absorbs more sunlight anyways because there's less sun in those areas. Not something I worry about...

Ha lucky us!!

I gave birth in Syria and they gave us vit D drops for the baby as a matter of course. It seems Muslim countries are aware of this issue and are actively combating it.

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So the lesson is this. Please do get out more into the sunlight, please dont wear exclusively black (a little tricky in Muharram, but we can work around that), and do drink your daily requisite supply of milk, etc etc. I hope this is a good enough summary for the aforementioned sister, if not, please let me know and I shall ammend it and include any potential erratum that may exist. Thank you, stay healthy, ws

Just a quick note on milk - a lot of milk contains higher levels of phosphorus than calcium. Phosphorus and calcium need to be balanced in the body and calcium will bind with phosphorus in order to neutralise it before being excreted from the body. Calcium is also used in the body to balance blood pH. Since milk is an acidifying food, much of the calcium in it is actually wasted on balancing the pH and potassium levels, rather than being used to support bones, teeth and provide its other benefits.

Some better sources of calcium include vegetables and plant derivatives (green leaves and seeds are particularly good) which are usually non-acidifying.

Great topic overall though. I just felt it was important to mention that milk isn't as great a source of calcium as it is made out to be.

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Barak Allahu feeki for this post i get this Question allot from sisters, as women we should be conserned about our Vit-D intake aswell InshaAllah try to have 3 servings /day of low fat dairy products this will lower your risk for deficiencys, try to get as much sun as you can they actualy have light bulbs that act like sunlight many hospitals use them for babies who have colic. I have not got around to seeing all the comments but MasahAllah its very important.

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