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Vitamin D deficiency and Muslim women

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1) Dont get fixated on the black issue. Just because you wear colors other than black does not make you immune from being Vitamin D deficient.

2) Blessed flower, inshallah I am sure you will deliver a wonderfully healthy child. Keep taking your vitamin supplements, eat healthy, remain moderately active, and keep close tabs on your health and follow the advice and recommendations of your Gynacologist who seems excellent to have gotten you successfully through a difficult first pregnancy

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No wonder islam frowns upon wearing black ''all the time, except in mohorram''. I dont have the source or reference but well first of all, anything allowed or forbidden in Islam has to do with Logic. Don't get me wrong here, most people associate the rules of Islam as something to be followed blindly, without really looking into them and at their reasons. Now I know why it is said that it's not right to wear ''all black'', and all black shoes.

Yes I agree with you here, but I asked for a reference because like you point out there are many who fail to take logic as sufficient evidence, unfortunately, and it's likely we'll encounter such mentalities in the future who dismiss opinions they don't like as mere conjecture even if it is demonstrated to be rational. So a reference would thus be handy, although, even Islamically speaking, aql/intellect is a form of guidance in and of itself.

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There are citations of research posted at the beginning of the post. If you are looking for literature showing that wearing black is more harmful than other colors I can dig up something when I get a chance

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There are citations of research posted at the beginning of the post. 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Actually my post was in reference to sis Starzzz post saying wearing black is in fact makrooh. So I was asking for an Islamic reference (hadith, etc) for that.

If you are looking for literature showing that wearing black is more harmful than other colors I can dig up something when I get a chance

That would be nice, actually, whenever you get the chance. Thanks.

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(bismillah)

(salam)

I just found out that I have very very low vitamin D levels, as well as low iron levels as well as being a carrier of Thalacimia (I think thats how you spell it)

I find it odd though because I live in a very hot and sunny climate, and I LOVE the sun and get out into the back yard nearly every day and just have a think in the sun for a while. And when I dont do that, Im always on the run doing something and so im outdoors a lot and when I drive I have the sun roof off most of the time. How could I have low vitamin D levels??

Fi Aman Allah

Edited by wattodo

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Sorry for the delay, did not see your post till today. Thalassemia patients are often osteoporotic. Its one of the newer finds in medicine. Recently a new drug has come out, Pamidronate, that stops bones from becoming weak by preventing bone breakdown in Thalassemia patients.

My advice is to take calcium supplements, and maybe discuss management of the hypoparathyroidism that is associated with Thalassemia that causes your low Vit. D levels

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(bismillah)

(salam)

Thank you for the reply Sir, it's greatly appreciated. The information you have given is quite suprising if not alarming. I will deffinetly be making another trip to the doctors inshaAllah.

Once again thank you for your input :)

Fi Aman Allah

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Well, keep in mind that what I said was a text book case, and that may, or may not be true in your case. Ask your doctor if your Thalassemia is a reason for you being osteoporotic and discuss management with him/her. Take care, good luck

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Vitamin D deficiency is said to be high in Asian women in general- the main reason that is given for this that I've heard at university is diet ie many are vegetarians eg Hindus. Are you sure that the reason that Muslim women have more Vitamin D deficiency is not due more to deficient diets rather then Hijab or staying in the house? Are you sure that the latter 2 reasons are not just guesswork?.

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salaam

sorry to bring this thread up againl, but i just read this in one of the first few posts:

" Therefore if we are sunlight deficient, and deficient in a diet of milk, butter and eggs, our body will compensate by producing PTH."

:o does that mean we need to eat butter? :sick: :squeez:

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Vitamin D deficiency is said to be high in Asian women in general- the main reason that is given for this that I've heard at university is diet ie many are vegetarians eg Hindus. Are you sure that the reason that Muslim women have more Vitamin D deficiency is not due more to deficient diets rather then Hijab or staying in the house? Are you sure that the latter 2 reasons are not just guesswork?.

Ten to fifteen minutes of sun exposure at least two times per week to the face, arms, hands, or back without sunscreen is usually sufficient to provide adequate vitamin D.

Wearing a hijab or staying in the house means that the amount of skin area exposed to the sun is already less than the minimum exposure that one needs. It's even worse if you have a lousy diet.

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Guest blessedflower

(bismillah)(salam)

Does vit. D difficiency affect joints and bones?

If you could please view my question here and suggest a suitable reply, I'd really appreciate it!

Edited by blessedflower

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(bismillah)

Assalam alaykum,

If you dont have adequate levels of Vit D, Calcium (from what I understand) will also be low in your body. The vitamin D helps the calcium be absorbed into our systems.

What you have mentioned goes to show that our Vitamin D levels are related more to lifestyle then whether or not we specifically wear Hijab.

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ws :wub:

You are very right sister in islam iman :wub: , the calcium in your body (more exactly bones) will be low if you have had low vitamin D levels for a while. This is why people who lead lives where their skin sees little direct sunlight, are at risk of osteoporosis and osteomalacia (as well as more prone to heart disease, type 1 diabetes and some cancers).

However, if my memory serves me correctly, many people with low vitamin D have normal levels of calcium in their blood. This is because, when vit D is low, the parathyroid hormone is increased and causes the leeching of calcium from the bones and into the blood stream in an attempt to normalise blood calcium levels. So if you take a blood test and your calcium levels are not low, your vitamin D levels may still be low (and if so, chances are your parathyroid levels are high).

For all you honeys in Australia, there is a great new form of Vitamin D on the market. Its called OsteVit-D. Its cheaper than ostelin, is the more active form of vit D (D3), and doesn't come in a gelatin capsule.

OstevitD-90s.jpg

ausmadeandowned.gif

and no i dont work for key pharmaceuticals :dry: , nor am romantically involved with or related to anyone working there or selling this product.

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Salaam.

At the GPs surgery I read a easy peasy way to help prevent calcium & vit D defficiency using something we Asians eat daily - bread or naan or chapati or whatever. By make the flour dough with hot water not cold and leave it under a towel to keep warm for 15 mins to 1 hr. This will increase the release of the calcium and vit D in the wheat. Make sure the water is previously boiled and cooled off abit and do not use boiling hot water as it will distroy the nutrients in the flour also you wil get burnt! The water should be just hot enough to handle. After this you can make the bread there and then which is better or fridge it whichever. So the point is do not use cold water for making daily bread.

Also, a good way to avoid difficiency with babies and children is to encourage more bread, pasta and oat foods and avoid the rice ones. Infact with babies its even easier - you can boil and mash almost any veg, because their taste buds are not so developed they find ordinary veggies sweet and tasteful; try carrot, turnip, potato, cauliflower, brocolli, sweet potato (pls avoid salt, chilli or other nonsense for babies). Also mash soft fruit eg, banana is the usual so try sharon fruit that has over-riped, mango, peaches, soft pear.

All this will also help the lower-works aswell - kill 2 birds with one stone or buy one get two.

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if you cant remember the reference of where you read this, please get it next time youre at the GP's. It doesnt sound right at all. chapati is infact something which has increased the risk of calcium/vit D def in people and wheat is not high in calcium or vit D.

1: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1981;60(2):131-4.

Severe contracted pelvis appearing after normal deliveries.Chaim W, Alroi A, Leiberman JR, Cohen A.

Three cases of contracted pelvis in Bedouin women, appearing after two and three previous normal vaginal deliveries, are presented. In these three cases cesarean section had to be performed to deliver the babies. A roentgenray screening revealed osteomalacic pelves in all cases with typical psuedo-fractures (Milkman) and Looser zones. Pelvic deformities of the osteomalacic type are considered rare medical curiosities, and elective cesarean section is usually indicated. It has been found that Bedouins consume large quantities of "raghif", an unleavened bread with high content of phytic acid, very similar to Indian "chapati". Phytic acid impairs the absorption of calcium from the intestine by the precipitation of an amorphous calcium phytate and causes probably some interference with the action of vitamin D. Withdrawal of this alimentation improves the illness. There is emphasis on the fact that vaginal delivery is not granted from a pelvic point of view for multiparous women who have delivered normally in the past. Bedouin women constitute a rather important fraction of the obstetric population admitted to our hospital, the only one in the Negev area. Almost 15 per cent of the deliveries in our Obstetrics Department belong to Bedouin women. The sudden appearance of three consecutive cases of contracted pelvis in which we had to perform ceasarean section on women who had previously delivered vaginally at least twice, produced this investigation, whose interesting results we describe herewith.

Edited by Cary Grant

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More on chapati and how to increase the nutritional absorbable content of food:

(sorry i havent provided a better overview/summary im strapped for time right now)

note: "Phytate or phytic acid is found in grains, nuts and seeds and can bind with calcium making it less absorbable".

Plant-food-based diets are rich in bioactive compounds, which

are believed to be beneficial for the prevention of noncommunicable

chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus,

etc. However, on the other hand, plant-food-based diets are also

rich in phytate. Phytate can decrease the bioavailability of critical

nutrients such as zinc, iron, calcium (2, 3), and magnesium (4)

because of its high binding affinities to minerals; on the other

hand, phytate may act as an antioxidant and anticarcinogen (5).

Phytate exerts its inhibitory effect on the absorption of

minerals by forming insoluble and undigestable complexes (6).

The effect of phytate on the bioavailability of minerals depends

upon not only the amount of phytate and minerals in the diets

but also the ratio of phytate/minerals. The relative bioavailability

of minerals can be predicted from the molar ratio of phytate/

minerals in the food and diet (7-13).

...

To study the effect of different cooking methods on the

phytate content, Panjin pearl rice was cooked with 4 different

methods, i.e., steamed after boiling and discarding the excessive

water and steamed, boiled, and cooked with a pressure pot

without discarding the cooking water. Significant differences

in phytate contents were found between uncooked and cooked

rice for each cooking method (p < 0.001). Rice steamed after

boiling and discarding the excessive water had a greater degree

of phytate reduction (78.6%) than cooked with a pressure pot

(48.7%), boiled (43.7%), and steamed (40.3%) without discarding

the cooking water. No significant differences in the phytate

content were found between steamed, boiled, and cooked with

a pressure pot. The result from the present study was similar to

that of Almana (22), who reported that discarding excessive

water in cooking rice may result in phytate degradation of 37-

65%, while retaining the water only results in degradation of

12%. The influence on the minerals content was also found with

different cooking methods. Both the iron and zinc content of

rice with four methods decreased compared with the raw

material, while the calcium content increased, which might be

caused by the high content of calcium in the cooking water

(23).

Because phytate is heat-stable, significant reduction during

cooking or any conventional heat-processing method is not

expected unless the cooking water is discarded, because some

nutrients will be solved in the cooking water (24). Discarding

cooking water will also result in a certain loss of nutrients at

the same time. This method may not be effective in improving

the bioavailability of minerals.

Studies in humans indicate that the absorption of zinc and

iron from a meal corresponds directly to its phytate content (25,

26). The phytate/minerals molar ratios are used to predict its

inhibitory effect on the bioavaiability of minerals. The phytate/

calcium molar ratio >0.24 will impair calcium bioavailability

(8). The phytate/iron molar ratio >1 is regarded as indicative

of poor iron bioavailability (27). Zinc absorption is greatly

reduced and results in a negative zinc balance when the phytate/

zinc molar ratio is 15 (10). When diets are high in both phytate

and calcium, phytate x calcium/zinc is a more useful assessment

of zinc bioavailability than the phytate/zinc molar ratio (13).

- J. Agric. Food Chem. 2005, 53, 10285-10290.

Matern Child Nutr. 2005 Oct;1(4):263-73.

Household dietary strategies to enhance the content and bioavailability of iron, zinc and calcium of selected rice- and maize-based Philippine complementary foods.

Perlas LA, Gibson RS.

Food and Nutrition Research Institute, Department of Science and Technology, Bicutan, Taguig, Metro Manila, Philippines. lap@fnri.dost.gov.ph

Philippine complementary foods are predominantly plant-based, with a low content of readily available iron, zinc, and calcium, and a relatively high amount of phytate, a potent inhibitor of mineral absorption. Some of the phytate is water soluble, and hence can be removed by soaking. In this study we have compared the iron, zinc, and calcium content, and estimated iron and zinc bioavailability of rice- and maize-based Filipino complementary foods prepared with and without soaking and/or enrichment with chicken liver, egg yolk, small soft-boned fish, and mung bean grits. Analysis of iron, zinc, and calcium were performed by atomic absorption spectrometry, and phytate (based on hexa-(IP6) and penta-inositol phosphate (IP5) by HPLC; corresponding [Phy]/[Fe] and [Phy]/[Zn] molar ratios were calculated as predictors of iron and zinc bioavailability. Addition of chicken liver, followed by egg yolk, resulted in the greatest increases in iron and zinc content for both the rice- and maize-based complementary foods, whereas addition of small dried fish with bones had the greatest effect on calcium. The IP5 + IP6 content and [Phy]/[Zn] molar ratios were higher in the maize- than rice-based complementary foods, and were reduced by soaking, although only the maize plus mung bean grits, with and without soaking, had [Phy]/[Zn] molar ratios above 15. Enrichment with animal protein or soaking has the potential to enhance the content of absorbable iron, zinc, and probably calcium to varying degrees in rice- and maize-based Philippine complementary foods.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;53(4):268-72.

Dietary and lifestyle factors affecting plasma vitamin D levels in Asian children living in England.

Lawson M, Thomas M, Hardiman A.

Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Child Health, London.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the vitamin D status of a sample of young Asian children living in England by measurement of plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels; to relate biochemical measurements with parameters of diet, lifestyle and iron status in this population. DESIGN: The 'Infant Feeding in Asian Families' survey covered infants born to mothers of Bangladeshi, Indian or Pakistani origin, plus a sample of children born to White mothers in 41 local authority areas. The current study describes vitamin D values in a sub sample of Asian children from that survey. SETTING: Forty-one local authority areas which covered 95% of the Asian population at the time of the 1991 Census and include areas with the highest and lowest density of Asians. SUBJECTS: Seventy-one percent (2382) of mothers who were originally eligible were interviewed on four occasions up to the time their infant was 15 months. One thousand, seven hundred and thirty-eight of these children were followed up for this current study. Of these 618 had a blood sample analysed for vitamin D. OUTCOME MEASURES: Previous day's food intake, normal dietary intake, indicators of iron status and plasma vitamin D levels. RESULTS: Plasma vitamin D values are lower in the three groups of Asian children than values reported for children of a similar age in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Between one third and a half of children with a low haemoglobin also had low plasma vitamin D values; there was a significant association between failure to take a vitamin supplement, chapati consumption and low vitamin D values. CONCLUSIONS: It is particularly important that pre-school Asian children receive a vitamin D supplement. Children with low haemoglobin values should be screened for vitamin D deficiency.

J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2006;20(1):49-57. Epub 2006 Mar 2.

Absorption of zinc and retention of calcium: dose-dependent inhibition by phytate.

Fredlund K, Isaksson M, Rossander-Hulthen L, Almgren A, Sandberg AS.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE 412 96, Goteborg, Sweden.

The dose-dependent inhibitory effect of sodium phytate (myo-inositol-hexaphosphate) on absorption of zinc and retention of calcium was studied in man. No systematic study of this dose-response effect has been reported to this time. Forty subjects were served meals containing white wheat rolls without/with additions of phytate. Ten subjects were given test meals containing one or two of the studied levels of phytate and in addition all subjects were served meals to which no phytate was added. The zinc content was 3.1 mg (47 micromol) and the calcium content 266 mg (6.6 mmol). The rolls were labelled extrinsically with radioisotopes, 65Zn and 47Ca, and whole-body retention of both minerals was measured. Totally 105 meals were served, 36 meals in which no phytate was added and 9-10 meals on each level of phytate. The zinc absorption in meals to which either 0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 140, 175 or 250 mg of phytate-P (0, 134, 269, 403, 538, 753, 941 or 1344 micromol phytate) had been added was 22%, 16%, 14%, 11%, 7%, 7%, 7% and 6%, respectively (mean values). The addition of 50 mg phytate-P or more significantly decreased zinc absorption (p=0.01) as compared to absorption from the test meals with no added phytate. The calcium retention at day 7 in the same meals was 31%, 28%, 27%, 26%, 22%, 19%, 14% and 11% (mean values). The addition of 100 mg phytate-P or more significantly decreased calcium retention (p=0.03) compared to the test meals with no added phytate. It was concluded that the inhibitory effect of phytate on the absorption of zinc and the retention of calcium was dose dependent.

Edited by Cary Grant

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I'm very grateful to have found this thread and it has answered a few questions, but has raised a couple for me...

I've got a Vitamin D level of 20 (with the normal range being 23-113). I drink plenty of milk and have yogurt every day, and cheese a couple of times a week. I try to eat fish at least once a week. I'm Australian born and raised and by no means lock myself up in the house. I get out in the sun (and have a hijab tan line -very attractive :blush: ).

Could a reproductive hormone imbalance effect levels of Vitamin D? I wonder if my reproductive system being all out of wack could be causing me yet more problems....

Thanks in advance!

Salams

hijabikel

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ws

in most parts of australia, the dairy products are not supplemented with vitamin D. It is only in places like the US were most of the milk is supplemented with about 200-400 U of vit D per serving. Dairy food itself does not have high vit D levels normally.

If you want to up your vit D my advice is either to increase your sun exposure (ie the amount of your body exposed) before 10 am and after 2-3 pm for about 10-20 min. It wouldnt be a bad idea to get vit D tablets, such as osteovit-D, I have posted a pic of the product a few posts above.

Could a reproductive hormone imbalance effect levels of Vitamin D? I wonder if my reproductive system being all out of wack could be causing me yet more problems....

I dont know. I would have to look it up. Best to ask your doc this question.

The doctor must have had some reason to check your vit D, it is not something routine that they do. Unless this particular doctor thought to throw it in with your routine blood tests since you wear hijab and are more likely to have vit D deficiency, since less of your body is exposed to the sun and our lifestyles since the industrial revolution have basically reduced our exposure to the sun.

right i just checked out your posts and realised that youre in melbourne. In melbourne, because they get less of the decent sunlight there, and vit D deficiency is more prevalent, they have milk that is vit D supplemented. Im sure you can find them in safeway. I also know that they sell Osteovit-D in Melbourne. You should be able to find it at most pharmacies.

Im surprised that although your vit D is below normal, your doc didnt suggest any remedy. Particularly since the test itself is not routine.

Edited by Cary Grant

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