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What do think about demonstrations in Iran

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2 minutes ago, andres said:

News from  bbc and Presstv are both propaganda. Bbc run by buisness and Presstv by the Iranian Priests. Lets see what happens. 

BBC is sponsored by the english government.

PressTV is sponsored by the Iranian government.

Of course they are going to share the news that are in their favor, this is nothing new.

The difference is that the british government has a long history of meddling in Iranian internal politics/affairs and manipulating it thru various malicious ways (see operation Ajax as one of numerous examples). So their agenda is clear. The british government is the cause of much chaos all around the world, see what role it had in the upbringing of house of saud(la), the chaos created after the division of Africa, etc.

If you want to take it further, you could ask yourself who influenced the british government to act this way? Why do they care whats going on Iran this much?

 

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There is a small minority that is unhappy with the financial situation in Iran, I have heard this before. That they dislike Hezbullah because, that money is "theirs".
I am sure some have a right to be angry.
This is a classic enemy tactic.To use money against us. They use this excuse in Lebanon against hizbullah. They say "Lebanon has a bad economy because of hizbullah, if you get rid of them the economy will improve.",  "Saudi will not invest in Lebanon as long as hizbullah is in power". These are the same tactics they used in Kufa. And they worked. 

Instead sheep should turn to the real people keeping them poor, USA and Co. Iran is the most sanctioned/cut off country on earth besides Nkorea. It has been this way for alomst 40 years now. How do you expect an economy to survive for so long let alone strive?

 

Edited by kirtc

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26 minutes ago, kirtc said:

Instead sheep should turn to the real people keeping them poor, USA and Co. Iran is the most sanctioned/cut off country on earth besides Nkorea. It has been this way for alomst 40 years now. How do you expect an economy to survive for so long let alone strive?

 

False. Sanctions against Iraq in the 90s are the worst in modern history, ever. Nothing that has been done to Iran even comes close to that.

It is said a million Iraqis died due to UN sanctions.

In fact, Iraq just had a few sanctions removed just a few weeks ago, related to the 90s.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanctions_against_Iraq

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53 minutes ago, andres said:

Presstv says the huge demonstrations today are in memory of a pro-Islamic demonstratio december 9th 2009. Do Iranians have a tradition to conmemorate every 8th year?

lt is Dey 9 epic, not Dec 9.

Also, lsIam does not have "priests" anymore than Jews have them. Priests -like a haruspex- are a Western and pagan thing. lslam has imam who lead prayer and scholars that fatwa an opinion.

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37 minutes ago, IbnSina said:

BBC is sponsored by the english government.

PressTV is sponsored by the Iranian government.

Of course they are going to share the news that are in their favor, this is nothing new.

The difference is that the british government has a long history of meddling in Iranian internal politics/affairs and manipulating it thru various malicious ways (see operation Ajax as one of numerous examples). So their agenda is clear. The british government is ...

 

 

The man interviewed by BBC Amerika that was identified as from BBC-Persian was almost overjoyed that some demonstration against the gov't was happening.

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1 hour ago, Sumerian said:

False. Sanctions against Iraq in the 90s are the worst in modern history, ever. Nothing that has been done to Iran even comes close to that.

It is said a million Iraqis died due to UN sanctions.

In fact, Iraq just had a few sanctions removed just a few weeks ago, related to the 90s.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanctions_against_Iraq

ok... so what? lol

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So there was a small protest against temporary poultry price rises? Whats the big deal? These small protests take place frequently all over the world. 

Thanks to the US/Trump for interfering anyways; makes it easier for the govt to blame outsiders and for people to realise it is in the enemys interest to create instability.

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3 hours ago, IbnSina said:

@andres

Please see bellow:

The reason I said these protests are guided by US is because of some disrespectful mottos. Asking government for jobs and good economy is a good practice in Islam, but it must be respectful.

Some people protested because of economy problems, but some of them were not. They had other intentions. These people who hide themselves among other people shouted death to rohani and other irrational slogans.

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3 hours ago, Abu Hadi said:

I agree with above points and this is probably overblown by anti-IRI groups. At the same time, I think it should be the #1 job of any government to try to make life better for the people of the country thru economic improvements, trying to keep inflation low, and diversifying the economy, which creates security. 

Many governments in the area, not just Iran, have heavily relied on revenue from petroleum  / natural gas in order to pay for government expenditures. Now that the era of reliance on this income is coming to an end (because of alternative energy sources and the glut of oil on the market), they should try to think how they can diversify and increase trade so that the economy can stabilize. Maybe they are already doing this, I don't know. 

 

Also I have looked at some of the clips of the anti government protests on BBC. It looks like a few hundred people. These are protests, but doesn't seem to be 'massive' or 'widespread' as most Western news outlets are reporting. 

http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/iran/publication/lifting-economic-sanctions-on-iran

Quote

This paper uses a global general equilibrium simulation model to quantify the effects of lifting economic sanctions on Iran and the effect of strategic responses to this trade regime change. The analysis highlights individually the countries and groups of countries that play an important role or could affect the outcome of the nuclear negotiations and the major oil exporting countries or country groups. It represents the lifting of Iran’s economic sanctions in a stylized fashion, emphasizing three components that are likely to have effects in the near to medium term: (i) the lifting of the EU oil embargo, (ii) the reduction in Iran’s trade costs, and (iii) the liberalization of cross-border imports of financial and transport services.  

The lifting of Iran’s economic sanctions is most beneficial to Iran’s economy. Its per capita welfare is expected to rise by 3.7 % mainly because of the lifting of the oil embargo imposed by the EU and the liberalization of cross-border trade in financial and transport services. Net oil importers gain while net oil exporters lose as the world price of oil declines by about 13 % due to the additional amount of oil sold on the global market in response to the recovery of Iranian oil exports to the EU. In per capita terms, Israel is the second largest beneficiary of the lifting of Iran’s economic sanctions, gaining almost 0.5 % in per capita welfare, while the EU and the US gain 0.5 % and 0.3 %, respectively. The losses are steepest for OPEC members, especially the GCC countries which as a group are expected to lose 3.9 % in per capita welfare. Per capita welfare for other OPEC members and Russia declines by 2.8 % and 1.6 %, respectively.   Overall, the world benefits most from the lifting of the EU oil embargo and less so from other aspects of the sanction removal as Iran accounts for a negligible share of the world’s non-oil trade.

Net oil exporting countries lose mainly due to the deterioration in their terms of trade. As many of them subsidize oil, the lower oil price will have a compensating efficiency gain, but not enough to reverse the welfare loss. Net oil importing countries gain mostly because of improvements in their terms of trade, but also because cheaper oil enables expansion of their petrochemical production and because in most of these countries oil use is taxed, so the interaction of existing distortions and structural change leads to efficiency gains.

 If major OPEC members limit the quantity of oil produced and exported to support the world oil price, they will enhance Iran’s gains, limit oil exporters’ losses, and reduce the gains to oil importers. The world would be worse off as the reduction in oil exporters’ losses would be insufficient to compensate the reduction in oil importers’ gains. 

Quote

http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/iran/publication/economic-outlook-april-2017

The Iranian economy experienced a strong recovery in 2016 as a result of sanctions relief, following a 1.8% contraction in 2015. However, growth prospects in the medium term are expected to be modest due to near capacity oil production and weak non-oil sector activity. The latter will not pick up unless FDI recovers, the economy reconnects with the international banking system, and more progress is made in implementing domestic reforms. Unemployment has ratcheted up and inflationary pressures have started to increase.

In the medium term, with some recovery in investment growth, Iran’s economy is expected to experience moderate growth rates, at slightly over 4%. The contribution of exports will diminish, as spare capacity in the oil sector is utilized and the increase in oil production decelerates. On the production side, the revival of non-oil industrial production is expected to be the main contributor to overall growth; agriculture and service sectors are projected to grow by around 4 and 3 percent, respectively. The gradual change in the composition of growth could also help increase employment due to higher job elasticity in these sectors.

 

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4 hours ago, Sumerian said:

False. Sanctions against Iraq in the 90s are the worst in modern history, ever. Nothing that has been done to Iran even comes close to that.

It is said a million Iraqis died due to UN sanctions.

In fact, Iraq just had a few sanctions removed just a few weeks ago, related to the 90s.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanctions_against_Iraq

yemen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famine_in_Yemen_(2016-Present)

 

somalia

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/michel-gabaudan/somalia-a-manmade-famine_b_910809.html

 

no intention to downplay the suffering of Iraqis

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1 minute ago, Chaotic Muslem said:

Neither of which are international sanctions which is what we were talking about.

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17 hours ago, Lion of Shia said:

really, americans and westerners think shia islam is true?

yes, in the sense that many believe it is the most comprehensive, and fullest expression of Islam, free from superstition and radicalism. 

I had an interesting discussion with some pretty right-wing people at a holiday party in the states a couple weeks ago. We were discussing the Muslim immigration issue, politics of the ME, and Islam in general. While these people were upset over the refugee/economic migrant situation in Europe, everyone agreed that it had little to do with Islam, and much more to do with economics, demographics, and ethnic conflict.

They also agreed that there is nothing conceptually wrong with Islam, and felt that many Islamic countries, especially Iran, have much greater social and religious cohesion than western countries, despite the problems. Some even went so far as to say that Shia Islam is in many ways better than Christianity! 

These views can be found among some in the west--others who are less educated and worldly have a knee-jerk hostility towards Muslims and Islam, because of the incidents of the last 40 years or so. I typically point out to these people that I live in an area that is mostly Middle-Eastern and Indian (about 30%+ Muslim at least, including Shia), and it has one of the lowest crime rates in the country. I never have to worry about getting attacked in the street or blown up. The people here are upper-middle-class (or upper), highly educated, moderate and tolerant, etc. 

I think what gets lost in all this is issues surrounding class, education, ethnic background, etc. Most will welcome a college educated Iranian in the neighborhood, but not everyone will welcome a Somalian with little or no education and skills, and a sketchy criminal background. I think we need to be honest about this, since it shouldn't be taboo to discuss. 

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30Dec17  Xinhuanet is saying these were protests over the lRl gov't raising the prices of fuel and bread (which are already 'dirt cheap'). NOTE:  Protests like this happened years ago for the same reason with rock throwing by teenagers back then, also.

Tass.com and RT.com have no reports on this.

Xinhua also has a 28Dec report on the increase in ASEAN trade in lran. So it is not some "economic crisis" Western media is lying about.

l was watching dw.com this morning. They had video of the Dey9 rallies and the caption underneath said "anti-gov't demonstrations". l was so disgusted l could not even laugh.

QUESTION: What are the large blue flags, some medium-sized red flags and smaller green flags all about (represent)?

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6 hours ago, AmirAlmuminin Lover said:

The reason I said these protests are guided by US is because of some disrespectful mottos. Asking government for jobs and good economy is a good practice in Islam, but it must be respectful.

Some people protested because of economy problems, but some of them were not. They had other intentions. These people who hide themselves among other people shouted death to rohani and other irrational slogans.

Like everywhere else, Iranians differ on politics. Being in oposition can be dangerous in a totalitarian state, so them trying to hide is understandable. 

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43 minutes ago, andres said:

Like everywhere else, Iranians differ on politics. Being in oposition can be dangerous in a totalitarian state, so them trying to hide is understandable. 

You need to study the history of Iranian politics a bit I think, as I said there have always been foreign powers meddling, have you for example research operation ajax? It is not as straight forward as you think with a bad evil dictator ruling over the poor people, there are other players involved.

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5 minutes ago, IbnSina said:

You need to study the history of Iranian politics a bit I think, as I said there have always been foreign powers meddling, have you for example research operation ajax? It is not as straight forward as you think with a bad evil dictator ruling over the poor people, there are other players involved.

I did not speak about a bad evil dictator, but in a totalitarian system like Iran, where people are relatively well educated, you will always have a variety of opinions and ideas. These cannot in the long run be opressed. Sooner or later Iran will becone an open democrasy.

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25 minutes ago, andres said:

I did not speak about a bad evil dictator, but in a totalitarian system like Iran, where people are relatively well educated, you will always have a variety of opinions and ideas. These cannot in the long run be opressed. Sooner or later Iran will becone an open democrasy.

Yes... hopefully we can also be lucky enough to have our own trump one day, the fruit of modern democracy.

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