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Ali-F

Moses didn't speak arabic but does in the Quran?

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This made me think.

We have many ayats' in the Quran' where Allah mentions stories of Prophets. I chose Moses (a) as an example.

Moses lived in Egypt, and in the Quran he speaks with Pharoah. Allah mentions the story in Arabic meaning their communication. But surely they didn't speak arabic. Does Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى "translate" their communication in arabic, or how should this be understood? 

Jzk. khayr. 

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Allah send revelation in the language of the Prophet who conveys so that his people may understand. For example: Moses (a.s) spoke Hebrew and the Torah was in Hebrew, Isa (a.s) spoke Aramaic and his Injil was in Aramaic, the people around them spoke this languages. By the way, Arabic evolved from Aramaic and Aramaic evolved from Hebrew.

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2 hours ago, Ali-F said:

This made me think.

We have many ayats' in the Quran' where Allah mentions stories of Prophets. I chose Moses (a) as an example.

Moses lived in Egypt, and in the Quran he speaks with Pharoah. Allah mentions the story in Arabic meaning their communication. But surely they didn't speak arabic. Does Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى "translate" their communication in arabic, or how should this be understood? 

Jzk. khayr. 

Well, arabic is language of this region. And even if this wouldn't be then Allah knows language of whole universe and He is creator of all things. Prophet Jesus a.s spoke "Aarasi" and Prophet Ibrahim a.s "Ibrani". So, Allah AWJ told us what they meant in their languages

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On 10/14/2017 at 3:30 PM, SunniBrother said:

Arabic evolved from Aramaic and Aramaic evolved from Hebrew

All of these languages are Central Semitic Languages, though Hebrew and Aramaic are more closely related than either are with Arabic, and all three descend from the same proto-language, that is Central Semitic which then broke apart into the North-West Semitic languages and Proto-Arabic, then the North-West Semitic languages broke off into proto-Aramaic and the Canaanite languages (among which is proto-Hebrew), but they did not descend from one another. 

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4 hours ago, Ibn Al-Ja'abi said:

All of these languages are Central Semitic Languages, though Hebrew and Aramaic are more closely related than either are with Arabic, and all three descend from the same proto-language, that is Central Semitic which then broke apart into the North-West Semitic languages and Proto-Arabic, then the North-West Semitic languages broke off into proto-Aramaic and the Canaanite languages (among which is proto-Hebrew), but they did not descend from one another. 

Thanks for the insight sidi

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7 hours ago, Ali-F said:

This made me think.

We have many ayats' in the Quran' where Allah mentions stories of Prophets. I chose Moses (a) as an example.

Moses lived in Egypt, and in the Quran he speaks with Pharoah. Allah mentions the story in Arabic meaning their communication. But surely they didn't speak arabic. Does Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى "translate" their communication in arabic, or how should this be understood? 

Jzk. khayr. 

yeah. most probably a translation of their conversation into arabic. one cant specially make this a daleel that since the quran mentions their convo in arabic, they must have spoken arabic. because the quran wouldnt have mentioned their convo in any other language.

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