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Salam,

Background:

My dad is a smart guy in general as he has done PHD. He is quite knowledgeable in a sense, as he use to listen to a lot of majlisis when he was young. He never read a book, however he got his knowledge purely from lectures which he attended during Muharram etc.   He hardly prays salah (I'm just letting you know just incase it has anything to do with his doubts). He hasn't read the whole quran with tafsir.

So For quite some time I have generally been concerned about my Dad's view regarding religion. It is only recently where he expressed his views openly to me. I don't know why he has so much doubts at this age. It makes my head hurt to argue with him. My dad is also very critical of others who are practicing Muslims. He always judges others and is more on the liberal side.

1. He says that he will never accept the story of prophet Ibrahim (as). He also hints that this story might of just been added and had no basis. My dad can't accept Allah ordering Ibrahim(as) to slaughter Ismail (as).

2. He believes that maybe not all verses of the Quran were there. He says that why is it that the first verse of Quran is not actually the first verse in the book.

3. A lot of stories during Muharram are created and exaggerated. He says that many scholars are emotionally controlling people. 

4. Says that there should never be segregation during Majlisis.

There are many more points, but I can't list them all here.

I can't understand my dad. Is he being misguided by Allah for neglecting prayers?

There is something about my Dad which I'm worried about. His doubts are also affecting my other siblings who have very little knowledge about Islam.

Edited by ali_fatheroforphans

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2 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

Salam,

Background:

My dad is a smart guy in general as he has done PHD. He is quite knowledgeable in a sense, as he use to listen to a lot of majlisis when he was young. He never read a book, however he got his knowledge purely from lectures which he attended during Muharram etc.  

:ws:

Heh, many of those lecturers have barely read anything themselves.

My condolences, it must be difficult to see your father in this state. Guidance is from Allah, you can reason with your father and deconstruct what he says, but submission comes from the heart.

I think it's important not to let him freely plant seeds of doubt in your siblings. Challenge the problematic things he says. Make him justify every claim. Doesn't like the story, why? What troubles him about a difficult command from Allah to test submission? Thinks the Qur'an must be in chronological order, why? Thinks verses of the Qur'an are missing, why? Tell him to bring textual evidence and prove every claim beyond doubt. As for what he says about "scholars" (I think it's a liberal and unfitting use of the term for many popular speakers), he's not entirely wrong.

The picture you've painted of your father is one of him putting his own intellect above submission to Allah, and going down a path I've seen others go down, it rarely ends well. I hope I'm wrong, may Allah guide him.

Edited by IbnMariam

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3 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

Salam,

Background:

My dad is a smart guy in general as he has done PHD. He is quite knowledgeable in a sense, as he use to listen to a lot of majlisis when he was young. He never read a book, however he got his knowledge purely from lectures which he attended during Muharram etc.   He hardly prays salah (I'm just letting you know just incase it has anything to do with his doubts). He hasn't read the whole quran with tafsir.

So For quite some time I have generally been concerned about my Dad's view regarding religion. It is only recently where he expressed his views openly to me. I don't know why he has so much doubts at this age. It makes my head hurt to argue with him. My dad is also very critical of others who are practicing Muslims. He always judges others and is more on the liberal side.

1. He says that he will never accept the story of prophet Ibrahim (as). He also hints that this story might of just been added and had no basis. My dad can't accept Allah ordering Ibrahim(as) to slaughter Ismail (as).

2. He believes that maybe not all verses of the Quran were there. He says that why is it that the first verse of Quran is not actually the first verse in the book.

3. A lot of stories during Muharram are created and exaggerated. He says that many scholars are emotionally controlling people. 

4. Says that there should never be segregation during Majlisis.

There are many more points, but I can't list them all here.

I can't understand my dad. Is he being misguided by Allah for neglecting prayers?

There is something about my Dad which I'm worried about. His doubts are also affecting my other siblings who have very little knowledge about Islam.

What is subject in which your dad has done PhD and where. 

And the questions he raised or doubted he is correct. This is not only your dad's but of many and most do not express it.

The main cause of it is scholars do not correctly convey masses  the knowledge of Tawheed of Allah. 

Hopefully give him a book of good scholar about Tawheed of Allah. 

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4 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

3. A lot of stories during Muharram are created and exaggerated. He says that many scholars are emotionally controlling people. 

Sounds familiar.

Maybe if you can develop a relationship with your siblings you can at least help them. Your dad's a smart guy like you said, so I guess ots up to Allah to guide him, but I mean of you want why not discuss with him? Condolences on that though, I fully understand what you're going through.

Wasalaam

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10 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

1. He says that he will never accept the story of prophet Ibrahim (as). He also hints that this story might of just been added and had no basis. My dad can't accept Allah ordering Ibrahim(as) to slaughter Ismail (as).

What's wrong here? Is LGBT better? or Lut [as] making incest with his daughters in the Bible?

10 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

2. He believes that maybe not all verses of the Quran were there. He says that why is it that the first verse of Quran is not actually the first verse in the book.

Thats due to Uthmans' copy of Quran, he made it not according to the order of revelations. But if you take a glance at the last of the Quran it is listed every surah with number and date of revelation.

 

10 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

3. A lot of stories during Muharram are created and exaggerated. He says that many scholars are emotionally controlling people

True, but I never saw scholars emotionally, except maybe at majalis, but I don't see he looks like he was reading sunnis and they're way of speaking, they curse our scholars, maybe he thought they are right?

11 hours ago, ali_fatheroforphans said:

4. Says that there should never be segregation during Majlisis.

Never, when did segregation appear unless it was done by Anti-Muslim unity people?

 

Wassalam, may Allah guide us all and put us on the right path, may your father gain more knowledge brother. 

:ws:

 

 

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On 9/28/2017 at 7:02 PM, ali_fatheroforphans said:

He hardly prays salah (I'm just letting you know just incase it has anything to do with his doubts). He hasn't read the whole quran with tafsir.

We should take into consideration that missing Salat is the 10th greatest sin. Marja ruled that Salat shouldn't be missed under any circumstances. A sin thats small in mass can have a big impact on your imaan. So just imagine committing a Major sin and repeating that sin and not doing Taubah. Allah is hardening his heart so in result unfortunately he is going to care less and less and life will be harder for him if he continues this path.

1. Imam Ibrahaim (as) has been mentioned numerous times in the Quran and there is a whole Surah dedicated to him. 

2. Bismillah Ar-Rahman Ar-Raheem is the first verse in Surah Fatihah. It is the first verse but this verse is used for many other surahs as well. You also have to consider the fact that this verse is one of the powerful verses regarding Allah سُبْحَانَهُ وَ تَعَالَى.

3. Rasoolalah (SAWA) poured tears for Husayn (as) and told Fatima bt. Muhammad (as) that the true believers would mourn over Husayn (as). This is in Ahadith.

4. Men have powerful desires. Men can grow to have strong sexual desires. One may look at a woman in a sexual way and wouldn't be able to focus during rememberance of Ahlulbayt (as).

Your father's heart is hardened from his sin. He makes these claims and at the same time he considers himself Muslim. Be a role model for your siblings. Read a lot. Gain more knowledge about Islam so that your faith can be strengthened and so you can easily counter their arguments when they try to prove you wrong. 

Amir al-Mumineen (as) said: 'Doubt is the product of ignorance.'

Also Ahlulbayt have said numerous times that seeking knowledge is obligatory. 

Try to teach them Islam too. 

Edited by Hameedeh
Long quote was shortened in length. No need to quote every word.

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