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SoRoUsH

Breaking prayers to attend a crying baby

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1168. It is haraam, as an obligatory precaution, to break obligatory prayers purposely. But if one has to break in order to protect property, or to escape from financial or physical harm, there is no objection. In fact, he can break it for any worldly or religious purpose which is crucially important for him.

1169. If it is not possible for a person to protect, without breaking the prayers, his own life, or the life of a person whose protection is obligatory upon him, or to protect a property the protection of which is obligatory on him, he should break the prayers.

1170. If a creditor demands payment from a person who is praying, and if there is ample time for namaz, he should pay him while praying, if that is possible. But if it is not possible to pay him without breaking the namaz, then he should break the namaz, pay the creditor and then pray.

1171. If a person learns during his prayers that the mosque is najis, and if time is short, he should complete the prayers. And if there is sufficient time, and making the mosque Pak does not change the form of prayers, he should make it Pak while praying, and then continue with the remaining part of the prayers. And if making the mosque Pak in that state changes the form of the prayers, breaking of prayers is permissible if making it Pak is possible after prayers; but if it is not possible, he should break the prayers, make the mosque Pak, and then offer prayers.

1172. In a situation where one must break namaz, if he goes on and completes it, his namaz is in order, though he will have committed a sin. However, the recommended precaution is that he should offer the namaz again.

1173. If a person offering prayers remembers before Qir'at, or before going to Ruku, that he has forgotten to say Adhan and Iqamah, and if he has sufficient time at his disposal, it is Mustahab that he should break the prayers and recite Adhan and Iqamah. In fact, if he remembers having missed them out before ending the namaz, if is Mustahab to break the namaz and pronounce them.

https://www.sistani.org/english/book/48/2235/

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13 minutes ago, SoRoUsH said:

Salam, 

Is it permissible to break one's obligatory prayers to attend a crying baby/infant/toddler? 

Thank you.

There are some occasions that you can break your pray:

1. If someone is in danger and he/she needs immediate help from other people but you're the only one. Or if other people are not aware of danger, but you know that.

2. If you owe money to someone and that person came to you in the middle of your pray (I'm not sure if it's permissible to break your pray when you owe something other than money)

I kinda forgot religious rules about breaking prays, but I think these are the only occasions that you can break. Baby crying is not the reason to break your Salaat. I'm sure about this.

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20 minutes ago, SoRoUsH said:

Is it permissible to break one's obligatory prayers to attend a crying baby/infant/toddler? 

 

13 minutes ago, Hassan- said:

1168. It is haraam, as an obligatory precaution, to break obligatory prayers purposely. But if one has to break in order to protect property, or to escape from financial or physical harm, there is no objection. In fact, he can break it for any worldly or religious purpose which is crucially important for him.

Definitely a crying baby/infant/toddler is crucially important. :muslima:

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Focus while praying is important. There's no way a parent or other caretaker will be able to focus on the prayer while the child is crying. I don't know any specific ruling, but it seems it would be traumatic for the infant and the parent to try to ignore the baby's needs and recite the prayer. 

Parents should take the needs of their young children into account: make sure the child is clean, fed, and comfortable, allow ample time, don't wait until time is almost up; and then the parent can relax and enjoy their prayers. 

Certainly tending to the needs of a helpless child is more urgent than making payments! 

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You are responsible for that child, attending him/her is religiously, ethically and legally your obligation. And I can't say more because I can't come across more ruling systems.

On a side note, seriously, can the person asking for money be more inconvenient than to come to you precisely when you are praying?

Edited by Bakir

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