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What kind of tea do you like?

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I love tea and infinitely prefer it over coffee. I can't understand world's addiction to coffee beans and I believe people need to smell the tea leaves really...

So on to teas.

Nothing beats a warm cup of Earl Grey medium brewed with just the right amount of milk (depends on milk type), preferably from Ceylon's or Darjeeling's tea farms or it's not worth it. 

I also adore the maroon-velvet coloured Iranian/Turkish teas that come with cubes of sugar. They have an entirely different culture (and taste) of chai that I'm used to over here, but I partake of it whenever I'm visiting. However, the Arab version of the same is such a shame.

I have had a type of Chinese tea -  I forget the name - which a friend brought from China. I can't find it over here so I ask him to bring me a cupboard full whenever he's in Beijing. That chai is wonderful. In Pakistan it would be called green tea but it's really something greater in character than our regular green tea (which most Pakis don't or can't prepare properly).

At roadside eateries when I ask for a "good chai" they bring me doodh patti. I for the life of me can't figure out who told them that that milky concoction makes for a good chai? I just can't stand that formula even though I was brought up drinking that thing in the village but rebelled as soon as I figured out my tea preferences. That said, let it be known that putting two spoonfuls of tea leaves in a cup of milk and burning brewing it does not make a cup of tea. (no offence to those who like it)

Kashmiri chai (the proper name is sabz chai) is also one of my favourite teas. To do it right you need to prepare the final product from the liquid extract rather than directly from tea leaves. The quality of the liquid underwrites the quality of the final product. It's a specialty and, so far as I know, unfound in any other part of the world.

I generally don't like flavoured teas except a slight hint of cardamom and finely cut dried fruits in Kashmiri chai. Other flavoured chais such as those fruit teas are for people who like to be called tea drinkers without drinking proper tea. It's like smoking menthol cigarettes and drinking cherry flavoured cola. Serious tea drinkers don't waste their taste buds on fruity concoctions. 

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10 hours ago, Sindbad05 said:

No, I drink tea because my brain thinks day has not started till tea convinces her, good morning Mr. Brain. 

Strong "horse" coffee is faster.

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11 hours ago, Meesum_Mtl said:

 

Moroccan Gunpowder Tea   ---Because they are always "shooting their mouths off" ?

Kashmiri Tea   ---lsn't it too cold to grow tea there?

:sorry: <---"Sorry, but l just couldn't resist. The Shaytan made me do it*"

 

* a gag from a 1970s TV program

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11 hours ago, monad said:

i bet none of you know why you actually drink tea.

yes, your world just shattered into a million pieces.

When I drank it several times, I think I have already loved it.

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3 hours ago, Marbles said:

I love tea and infinitely prefer it over coffee. I can't understand world's addiction to coffee beans and I believe people need to smell the tea leaves really...

So on to teas.

Nothing beats a warm cup of Earl Grey medium brewed with just the right amount of milk (depends on milk type), preferably from Ceylon's or Darjeeling's tea farms or it's not worth it. 

I also adore the maroon-velvet coloured Iranian/Turkish teas that come with cubes of sugar. They have an entirely different culture (and taste) of chai that I'm used to over here, but I partake of it whenever I'm visiting. However, the Arab version of the same is such a shame.

I have had a type of Chinese tea -  I forget the name - which a friend brought from China. I can't find it over here so I ask him to bring me a cupboard full whenever he's in Beijing. That chai is wonderful. In Pakistan it would be called green tea but it's really something greater in character than our regular green tea (which most Pakis don't or can't prepare properly).

At roadside eateries when I ask for a "good chai" they bring me doodh patti. I for the life of me can't figure out who told them that that milky concoction makes for a good chai? I just can't stand that formula even though I was brought up drinking that thing in the village but rebelled as soon as I figured out my tea preferences. That said, let it be known that putting two spoonfuls of tea leaves in a cup of milk and burning brewing it does not make a cup of tea. (no offence to those who like it)

Kashmiri chai (the proper name is sabz chai) is also one of my favourite teas. To do it right you need to prepare the final product from the liquid extract rather than directly from tea leaves. The quality of the liquid underwrites the quality of the final product. It's a specialty and, so far as I know, unfound in any other part of the world.

I generally don't like flavoured teas except a slight hint of cardamom and finely cut dried fruits in Kashmiri chai. Other flavoured chais such as those fruit teas are for people who like to be called tea drinkers without drinking proper tea. It's like smoking menthol cigarettes and drinking cherry flavoured cola. Serious tea drinkers don't waste their taste buds on fruity concoctions. 

Nice to meet you

Tea is one of the three major beverages in the world, some tea is bitter, some slightly sweet, but all with a memorable tea fragrance. Drinking tea with the elimination of fatigue, refreshing eyesight, digestion and diuretic efficacy, long-term drinking tea to the human body is more health-care role.

Tea originated in China (also some people think originated in India), developed in the world. There are many tea-drinking countries in the world that have countless ties with tea culture. For example, the Chinese tea ceremony, the British afternoon tea, the Russian people like to drink black tea, Indians like to drink tea and so on. Many countries have a long history of tea drinking, the tea culture of various countries have infiltrated the local folk customs of the dribs and drabs. The exchange of globalization, the tea culture spread in the world, and People's lifestyles, customs and other integration, showing the colorful world of tea drinking habits.

I like tea, especially black tea, green tea and Oolong tea. They all have different flavors.There are kinds of tea in China, and there are a lot of people like it.

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14 minutes ago, hasanhh said:

I had Brenner Tea last night. lt is a Green Tea with lemon peel and ginger already added. Got it on sale.

I like strong hot tea with nothing.

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14 hours ago, Sindbad05 said:

No, I drink tea because my brain thinks day has not started till tea convinces her, good morning Mr. Brain. 

@monad you were confused by "her" lolz bra, Nowadays, I have been reading regular posts by females on this forum and listening to their problems and thoughts, so, it is due to this confusion that instead of "him" I wrongly wrote "her'. But I am a male, I would not conceal myself as there is no any need of that. Just fault of my sleeping brain. 

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Black tea with just a little bit of honey, of course.

There are few scents nicer than tea. I wish I could find tea scented bath products and perfumes. It would please me to go about my day smelling like a soothing and refreshing cup of tea. 

I'm caffeine sensitive, so I also drink herbal tea in the evening. Of those, my favorite is peppermint, but I also like anise and lemon ginger these days, and I enjoy trying new flavors. 

I don't like the taste of green tea. 

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5 hours ago, hasanhh said:

l agree. Have you ever been in a tea field?

No, but I'm interested! Do they grow in the United States, or should I renew my passport? 

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2 minutes ago, hasanhh said:

Wiki says: Alabama and South Carolina.

A quick Google search informs me that I can grow my own! But before I try, I'll need to get the rest of my plants under some semblance of control. Now that I know, it's going to the top of my plantings wish list. 

http://www.offthegridnews.com/food/how-to-grow-your-own-tea/

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6 minutes ago, notme said:

A quick Google search informs me that I can grow my own! But before I try, I'll need to get the rest of my plants under some semblance of control.  Now that I know, it's going to the top of my plantings wish list. 

http://www.offthegridnews.com/food/how-to-grow-your-own-tea/

Uhhhhhh...what kind of "plants" ?  :D

:clap: Trick Question.

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34 minutes ago, hasanhh said:

Uhhhhhh...what kind of "plants" ?  :D

:clap: Trick Question.

I had typed a long catalog of plants in my property, but then I remembered that the topic is tea. I've heard that you can make a tea from banana leaves, but the internet isn't telling me how. Hydrangea tea is apparently a thing but some species are toxic. We've got at least four unkempt rosebushes, and rose tea is lovely. So many plants! Must find a purpose for them all! 

 

Edited by notme

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14 hours ago, notme said:

I had typed a long catalog of plants in my property, but then I remembered that the topic is tea. I've heard that you can make a tea from banana leaves, but the internet isn't telling me how. Hydrangea tea is apparently a thing but some species are toxic. We've got at least four unkempt rosebushes, and rose tea is lovely. So many plants! Must find a purpose for them all! 

 

A "tea" is made from any dried plant material mixed with boiling water. Whether it is healthy or not depends on the material.

Did you ever try sassafras tea ?

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7 hours ago, hasanhh said:

Did you ever try sassafras tea ?

I had forgotten about sassafras tea! It's one of my favorites! We used to collect the roots in the woods and bring them home to make tea. Sometimes you can find a concentrated liquid in stores. I'll have to introduce my children to it. They all like sweet iced tea and iced sassafras tea is quite nice.

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