Kilij

Why Worship God?

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Hello, Kilij here.

 

I'm a university student that was never born into a faith or raised into being religious. I never knew my father and mother never liked her experience with religious upbringing thus she didn't raise me into faith. I now have been very interested in religious studies and while a secular field, I am now pretty much open to the belief that God probably exists, so this thread won't require any proofs of God(though I may need some clarifications on what God's nature is like in Islamic theology), but I have perhaps a stranger question I mean to ask with the utmost respect and desire to learn. So forgive me in advance as this will sound blunt, but why do I need God? I really want to find faith, I do, given the choice between belief and unbelief, I see no reason to not at very least believe. However, I still feel there's no reason to adopt religion and become actively religious. I've had a traumatic early childhood at school, was driven to depression when I was failing academically before university(and was rejected by every university I wanted), and was betrayed by several friends. Yet each and every hardship I emerged from as a much stronger and wiser person, all before I was even open to the idea of a single omnipotent God, thus I feel I alone claim the credit for my ultimate success since I highly doubt God would've helped me back in those times. Many people seem to turn to faith at their weakest and turn away from faith at their highest points in life. Yet I have come so far without having turned to faith, other than just simply faith in myself. If I can strike down the obstacles and naysayers in my own life without God, why should I surrender myself to God? The religious life is certainly not easy, especially for one such as myself who lack the experience in worship, things like praying and memorizing passages. I feel as if adopting a religion would add difficulty life, not take it away, especially with Islam in today's political climate. Also since I still doubt God will actually communicate to me, even if I did pray regularly. I guess I kinda just think of God as being very detached from the world and uninterested in a mere individual person such as myself, though perhaps concerned with humanity as a whole and the struggle for an egalitarian, just, and sustainable world, though that might just be my political convictions talking now. Whereas I'm very much the opposite these days, very much of the world in my aspirations in the here and now, desiring the knowledge and power to make a difference both to my personal life and to help make the world a better place.

 

I wish for your wisdom in addressing my doubt and appreciate attempts to help

Thank you all kindly,

-Kilij

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Salam,

You ask why you should worship Allah then let me ask you: Why should you not worship Allah?

Ponder with your human brain as much as you can ponder and reflect as much as you can reflect with you human brain on what Allah actually is.

He is something that is beyond time, He is not defined by time, He is something that is not bound to the past nor the future nor the present. He is something that is beyond space, can you comprehend what it means to be beyond space? He was there before everything and will be there after everything.

Whatever you eyes can see and whatever your eyes cannot see, whatever your ears can hear and whatever your ears cannot hear it is all created by Him. The very structure of your body, every atom, your finger prints, all your muscles, it is created by Him and He has the power of maintaining it or destroying it with a single word. The atoms stay in place and structure by His command.

Imagine the most beautiful things you can imagine, the chubby hand of a toddler, the laughter of kids, an early spring morning, a peaceful lake at sunset in the midsummer, the first snow, a field of flowers, the taste of a nice soup when your cold, etc. It is all created by Him. All this beauty.

How can you not worship Allah?

If you had a friend that had done amazing things for mankind and for you, the kindest person you know, would you not appreciate him and show your appreciation?

If there was a being who had FULL control over everything you can imagine, everything that ever was and ever will be, who then showered you with mercy and beauty. Who was kind and just and always wants your best, full of mercy, who gives without limits, gives you that which you appreciate and that which you do not appreciate, gives without limits. Say thank you one time and you have said thank you one time to little.

How can you not worship Allah?

 

 

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I wanted to start off by congratulating you for searching for more, not everyone does that. It's fascinating to see people with different upbringings look into different faiths, it just shows strength, intelligence and rationality. The most important reason for me to believe in God is because my life is just more fulfilling with God in it. People can be happy with financial wealth, health, love and a good life but belief in God just fulfills something else in you. God just fills in a gap that you didn't even know needed to be filled in. For example, a child might have a toy they love to play with and are completely content but later they might get an electronic toy and realize how much better it is. They were perfectly content with the initial toy until they realized they can be more entertained with an electronic toy. Sometimes you think you have all you want in life but that's because you haven't really experienced anything else. It's great that you believed in yourself in times of difficulty and you should be proud of that but sometimes there are scenarios in life where you have no control over. For example, a loved one is ill. Belief in yourself will not help you cure the person but rather belief in a higher authority, even if the person does not get cured, will give you hope. Many studies show belief in God and praying does have healing power. Also, studies show belief in God is good for you, it makes your happier, healthier and live longer. Having hope is probably the most important thing in life and I find belief in God the ultimate source of hope for me. You may think God will not help you in difficult situations but you'll be shocked how much he can. You mentioned belief in yourself helped you overcome your difficulties, now imagine belief in something greater than yourself. That will give you more strength to overcome anything. Also, I personally have had countless examples in my personal life that I honestly don't have any idea how it worked out other than through God's help. In addition, belief in God helps you live more peacefully and accept obstacles and conflicts because you know it's God's will. I think religion and God give you more purpose to life and a reason to live. Without religion for me personally I wouldn't know the overall purpose of life and live very meaninglessly. Your idea of God is deistic model which portrays God more detached from the universe, I think this often leads to people to not seeing the role of God in their personal life. From a philosophical perspective maybe look at the five models of God by McFague (deistic, dialogic, monarchial, agential and organic). I hope that answers some of the basics of your questions. Let me know if you want me to expand on any points, I would write more but don't want you to feel like you're reading a novel. Feel free to PM if you have any more questions.

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1 hour ago, Kilij said:

If I can strike down the obstacles and naysayers in my own life without God, why should I surrender myself to God? The religious life is certainly not easy, especially for one such as myself who lack the experience in worship, things like praying and memorizing passages. I feel as if adopting a religion would add difficulty life, not take it away, especially with Islam in today's political climate. Also since I still doubt God will actually communicate to me, even if I did pray regularly. I guess I kinda just think of God as being very detached from the world and uninterested in a mere individual person such as myself, though perhaps concerned with humanity as a whole and the struggle for an egalitarian, just, and sustainable world, though that might just be my political convictions talking now. Whereas I'm very much the opposite these days, very much of the world in my aspirations in the here and now, desiring the knowledge and power to make a difference both to my personal life and to help make the world a better place.

I wish for your wisdom in addressing my doubt and appreciate attempts to help

Thank you all kindly,

-Kilij

It's good to know that you have the will to fight your own battles. But I doubt that we can face all of the obstacles in life without there being a need of someone, human or a deity. Religious life is certainly not easy because it demands discipline and commitment. So does the life of any person with a goal. Successful people with a vision almost always face a life of hardship and extraordinary efforts. Therefore staying away from a deity for this very reason sounds unreasonable. Furthermore, it may sound as though God is not communicating in response to many of our prayers. But this sense of detachment can be relative. For example how many times in life do we find ourselves being concerned about those of His creatures who are helpless?

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Assalam aleikum,

There's a beautiful quote from Imam Ali (as) who said 'I do not worship Allah (swt) because I fear Hell, for that would be the worship of a slave. And I do not worship Allah to gain Paradise because that would be the worship of a business man. No I worship Allah (swt) because He is worthy of worship.'

If you sit down and think for a moment of the things that you've had in your life. You've had a house to live in and a bed to sleep in, all those things are from Allah (swt). You've always had good food and drink, they are from Allah. You've always had clothes, luxuries and access to education. All these things are from Allah (swt). He gave you these things, things that some people only dream of, and these are just a number of things. Despite how hard life can get, we can always find blessings from Allah (swt) because He loves us. And when you understand that love, you cannot help but love him back and want to worship Him.

There are no sad endings for those who have Allah (swt). :) 

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because there is no-one else to worship. lol 

in order to worship something it has to be higher than you. 

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:salam:

I’m glad you’ve come to this forum specifically – it belongs to a particular sect within Islam and we Shia make up the minority of the Muslim population today. We holds beliefs that, when understood correctly, you will definitely find appealing. :sign_welcome:

‘It is religious faith alone which, above all, respects truth, honours justice, encourages kindness and mutual confidence, inculcates the spirit of piety, acknowledges moral values, emboldens the individuals to resist tyranny and unites them into a homogeneous body’.

-          -Shaheed Murtadha Mutaheri (ra)

You may feel that no divine hand had a play in your success, but this is not true. The fact that your even here and are open to the existence of a greater Reality than yourself is your fitrah (primordial instinct) guiding you towards Him. The human soul naturally yearns for its Creator.

You seem content with overcoming life’s obstacles, but tell me, can you honestly say you feel a distinct inner peace within you? Are you truly happy? The feeling you can sometimes get after constant ibadah (worship), be it in the form of salah (prayer) or dua (supplication), is overwhelming – once you experience this for the first time you’d feel like every human in the world would bow their heads in prostration if they felt it. You need God for two things: Inner peace and individual (spiritual) perfection.

As for the trauma in your early life, perhaps you can find relief in the fact that our religious history is filled with great people who suffered the imaginable, and yet their faith never shook even for an instant. Try searching the tragedy of Karbala.

Advice (for now):

  •           Try reading the Qur’an and see how you find it

  •           Read The Heart of Islam by Seyyed Hossein Nasr – it contains chapters on Islamic theology, contemporary Islamic politics, Divine law/justice, compassion/love, Human rights and responsibilities – a good overall introduction

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:salam:

Personally, I find it easier to live life with instructions rather than making things up as I go. What is considered right and wrong changes with time and shifts with societal culture. I trust the judgement of the Most Wise more than I do my own. So I turn to his book(s) for guidance. My knowledge and capcity are limited, His isn't. And although what is asked of me only benefits me (God doesn't need anything from us), I am then rewarded for helping myself. Indeed, God is most loving. 

Besides these "instructions", religion also helps explain what is beyond our understanding, simplyfing things as much as possible. Do you not wish to understand the world beyond its material existence? I sure do. Then again, we all hold different interests ^_^ 

Regarding your point, that faith is strongest in the weak- that isn't true. This may be/have been your experience, but not everyone will agree. It depends on the individual. 

As for your point regarding making it through struggles without the need of God- faith doesn't guarantee you an easy life. All faith does is help you through it. God won't give you more than you can handle. Perhaps because of your lacked faith, God gave you struggles you could handle without the need for faith? Many would be gratful to hold the hardships you do instead of their own. I don't mean to undermine your struggles, but try to fill the shoes of someone in a war-torn zone and look at your life again. What do you see? Plus without hardships ir challanges , we won't be able to improve/develop. 

It's silly to expect everyone who picked up a Quran automatically rid himself/herself from hardships. In fact in most cases, the pious struggle most. Like imam hussein for instance. The more struggles you overcome the greater your deeds the higher your place in heaven. 

:ws: 

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Thanks everyone for the wisdom you have given me, It sure seems my path is very well not mere happenstance, yet it is much harder for me to realize God in my heart than in my mind. I fear I lack a true heart to even begin practicing religion, though it is probably natural for it to start as an uphill battle, especially for an adoptee. I have hope however, and that you have given some of your time to aid me is too an inspiration. I will now address individual posts.

 

@IbnSina

Thanks for the insight and the beautiful video, I think one of my worst problems is that I don't see the beauty in life anymore, I see only injustice, exploitation, the deterioration of the planet, and worst of all a majority of people who do not care or even bat an eye to it all. I was once content to enjoy my tea in the countryside and read or even just lie down and forget the worldly struggles. Now I find it hard to sit down even a moment without the world's evil disturbing my peace and tempting me to draw the sword of which to strike it all down. As a traveler, I have spent much time trying to find beauty and true happiness in the world, but to little avail, all that searching and I have gotten nowhere, nay I've become even more the lost wanderer. You post makes me think though, think that it is likely God I seek, but whether I should try and look to God as my guide or destination however, I know not.

 

@Inner Peace

Thank you very much for the wisdom, and I too am often impressed by the diversity in people I have met. One of my good friends is a Kurd who calls himself an "Abrahamic", since he believes all the faiths are true and lead to God, the deep discussions we had were what really helped open me up to the power of faith, he really made me think and also it was inspiring that he overcame narcotic use(still drinks though I think), he also told me about his Moroccan fishing buddy who went on the hajj with his uncle by foot, horse, and camel all the way from Morocco, just the thought of that puts me in awe. I'm certain your right about the power of faith, I too have also heard and accept that there are mental and physical health benefits from belief. I also can testify that life without belief is like TV without colour, I may be used to it, but I do not see the world in the same quality as the faithful. Your post is much appreciated, I'll also take a look at that philosophical suggestion.

 

@Abbas.

You make a really good point, even if I have the willpower to bear the entire world's burdens, how can I not find the will in me to make covenant to God? Why would I walk the path alone when it is easily to be discouraged in that way? I should kill the roots of my troubles, rather than being content to just keep trimming them time and time again.

 

@zainabamy

Your words and those of Imam Ali both ring true and hit home to me. Though I have been bestowed with privileged life and the power to lead it as I will, it pains me to think that God would will that many must suffer their whole lives even if one such as myself has a decent life, I would rather all are equal. Though the question of theodicy is one I constantly ponder, I think God would also ultimately want the same egalitarian world I dream of, which is one of the strongest reasons I would seek God if that is indeed the case.

 

@Vestige

Thanks for the welcoming and thought-provoking post, inspiring quote, and wise recommendations. I certainly do lack any true inner peace, I can admit that. Still, I often feel as if my insular heart is incapable of giving love to God, autism can make such connections difficult(I failed to mention I am autistic, which may have clarified a lot, but I don't like to place the blame on everything to my autism as I lost most of the characteristic of it as I grew up). I still hope I can also experience spiritual fulfillment, yet it will be a difficult and long transformation if I actually do. I have at least a basic gist of the history of Shia Islam, though I must admit my ignorance into the religious differences in terms of beliefs and faith. As of yet, the only scripture I have really dived into are the Psalms, which really do inspire me to great deeds. So far I had only read the Quran up to somewhere in Surah Al-Baqarah, yet I was reading it in a heavily annotated translation in pdf form, which while making sense of where I found difficulty reading, really made it a struggle to read, I decided to just wait until the semester is over so I have more time and have a good translation in text form so I can find a nice place to read while relaxed and do so slowly.I just got a pdf of The Heart of Islam and started reading it through, it certainly seems a valuable read.

 

@yusur317

Thank you, you've helped make sense where I have doubts. I often wonder what God wants the world to be like, I would imagine ideally suffering would have no place in it, so then the question of theodicy comes into play. Are we being put to the test? Is it just part of the plan? Perhaps we're being punished? Or is suffering an interference from an opposing power(Satan)? These are the kind of things that came up in some of my religious studies classes, yet I haven't yet heard Islamic points of view yet on theodicy. Oh, also I didn't mean to imply that faith is strongest in the weak, I just have observed that many who are at least nominally religious seem to practice more or only in the hard times, which is still but an observation.

 

Thank you all again for the great posts, it really helps!

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1 hour ago, Kilij said:

 

@Vestige

Thanks for the welcoming and thought-provoking post, inspiring quote, and wise recommendations. I certainly do lack any true inner peace, I can admit that. Still, I often feel as if my insular heart is incapable of giving love to God, autism can make such connections difficult(I failed to mention I am autistic, which may have clarified a lot, but I don't like to place the blame on everything to my autism as I lost most of the characteristic of it as I grew up). I still hope I can also experience spiritual fulfillment, yet it will be a difficult and long transformation if I actually do. I have at least a basic gist of the history of Shia Islam, though I must admit my ignorance into the religious differences in terms of beliefs and faith. As of yet, the only scripture I have really dived into are the Psalms, which really do inspire me to great deeds. So far I had only read the Quran up to somewhere in Surah Al-Baqarah, yet I was reading it in a heavily annotated translation in pdf form, which while making sense of where I found difficulty reading, really made it a struggle to read, I decided to just wait until the semester is over so I have more time and have a good translation in text form so I can find a nice place to read while relaxed and do so slowly.I just got a pdf of The Heart of Islam and started reading it through, it certainly seems a valuable read.

 

Glad we could help.

If you're having trouble reading then there are always lectures available if this makes it easier for you. I've linked this great lecture series by a great speaker down below. Definitely recommend. No pressure - just watch it whenever you want as a way to learn and relax.

 NB: Lectures 2-7 are especially good. 

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To be make it short, because we been given a valuable treasure in us (called love) that teaches to value things as they ought to be valued or as best as we can. God the source of all value, and the only way to know your true value, and the one who sees you and hence gives you your true objective value and makes you inherit your value, has made it incumbent upon creation to value his light to the best of our ability. That light of God found in creation is one and same with Mohammad and his family which is why we are told the path of God is to love them. When we don't make God's Name the standard, we don't know our own value, the value of others, or the value of the most valued being, or the best of humans or creation either. We become ignorant of everything.

Edited by StrugglingForTheLight
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17 hours ago, Kilij said:

Hello, Kilij here.

 

I'm a university student that was never born into a faith or raised into being religious. I never knew my father and mother never liked her experience with religious upbringing thus she didn't raise me into faith. I now have been very interested in religious studies and while a secular field, I am now pretty much open to the belief that God probably exists, so this thread won't require any proofs of God(though I may need some clarifications on what God's nature is like in Islamic theology), but I have perhaps a stranger question I mean to ask with the utmost respect and desire to learn. So forgive me in advance as this will sound blunt, but why do I need God? I really want to find faith, I do, given the choice between belief and unbelief, I see no reason to not at very least believe. However, I still feel there's no reason to adopt religion and become actively religious. I've had a traumatic early childhood at school, was driven to depression when I was failing academically before university(and was rejected by every university I wanted), and was betrayed by several friends. Yet each and every hardship I emerged from as a much stronger and wiser person, all before I was even open to the idea of a single omnipotent God, thus I feel I alone claim the credit for my ultimate success since I highly doubt God would've helped me back in those times. Many people seem to turn to faith at their weakest and turn away from faith at their highest points in life. Yet I have come so far without having turned to faith, other than just simply faith in myself. If I can strike down the obstacles and naysayers in my own life without God, why should I surrender myself to God? The religious life is certainly not easy, especially for one such as myself who lack the experience in worship, things like praying and memorizing passages. I feel as if adopting a religion would add difficulty life, not take it away, especially with Islam in today's political climate. Also since I still doubt God will actually communicate to me, even if I did pray regularly. I guess I kinda just think of God as being very detached from the world and uninterested in a mere individual person such as myself, though perhaps concerned with humanity as a whole and the struggle for an egalitarian, just, and sustainable world, though that might just be my political convictions talking now. Whereas I'm very much the opposite these days, very much of the world in my aspirations in the here and now, desiring the knowledge and power to make a difference both to my personal life and to help make the world a better place.

 

I wish for your wisdom in addressing my doubt and appreciate attempts to help

Thank you all kindly,

-Kilij

I was just explaining to some of my students about what makes people not care much about the religious life.  and I was telling them that it all has to do with the way we uderstand God.  I noticed a red flag when you said that God is "probable".  If God is probable it isn't worth sacrificing your entire life for such a being.  Our heart  (are subconsciously) repulsed by the idea of devoting our lives to a being who might not exist (even if there is a high chance He does).   The reason is because such a being has nothing to do with us in any concrete, experiential, and truly meaningful sense!  We live our lives by whatever we regard as real for us.  For example, we love eating because for us food is real!  looking for a comfortable shelter is real for us and therefore we seek it and work all day long for it.  

So to be religious and to take region seriously is only possible if It is real for us (if God is real for us).  So Is He?  

Edited by eThErEaL
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23 hours ago, Kilij said:

Your words and those of Imam Ali both ring true and hit home to me. Though I have been bestowed with privileged life and the power to lead it as I will, it pains me to think that God would will that many must suffer their whole lives even if one such as myself has a decent life, I would rather all are equal. Though the question of theodicy is one I constantly ponder, I think God would also ultimately want the same egalitarian world I dream of, which is one of the strongest reasons I would seek God if that is indeed the case.

I had this thought once too. The thing is God gives us everything, he's provided everything we need but its people who have messed everything up. People aren't poor because God decided that, its because Mankind is corrupt and as a result you have rich and poor. Allah (swt) never wills injustice for His people. 

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@Vestige

Thanks so much again, that lecture is absolutely amazing! I'm definitely learning much and realizing just how inspiring the Ahlul-Bayt and their struggles really are. A truly intelligent and skilled speaker. I know as I watch that my heart is indeed being moved and instilled with higher purpose. The Imams were so great, perfect even, and yet they sacrificed everything for God. I'm on part 4 now and already I feel blessed with a new persistence to do what is to be done to connect with God. Thus not only shall I keep learning, but I will do my duty and connect to God, and learn how to worship him. So indeed, you have my gratitude.

 

@StrugglingForTheLight

I certainly agree with such wisdom. As I now learn about the Ahlul-Bayt, it is clear to me God Must be the source of value and virtue and no value be known without God. I thank you for your insightful words.

 

@eThErEaL

That certainly sounds logical. Many of us live as animals, some even worse in the extent of what awful things they would do to raise their material living standards above and at the expense of others. As for myself, I've never questioned belief in a "higher power" as many of my generation expresses their beliefs, but I've questioned the nature of that power ever since I've started thinking about religion. I've wondered the past few years whether that higher power could have physical manifestations, whether it was everything or in everything or was completely outside of the material world. I've questioned whether the higher power has any power/presence in the physical or has to be known through complete transcendence. In most of the early stages of such questioning, I would have refused to call the higher power as God, which I could only envision in an anthropomorphic sense or as perhaps a different(though not quite separate) being. Now, however, I would only use the name God to refer to "no god but God" just as the Shahada reads in English. The more I begin to understand the oneness of God the more I notice my faith in God, so even if I have felt I didn't need God, I've been travelling on the right path for sure. My answer is Yes, God exists. Thank you for bringing about this reflection.

 

@zainabamy

Exactly! God would not will injustice upon us. We definitely bear responsibility for the state of humanity, therefore I will not shirk my duty to be just and virtuous, but I will now be so with faith too.

 

Thank you all so very much, I have already seen much self-improvement, growth in confidence, and happiness since I have opened this thread. I hope it helps others as well. I will continue to learn and take the steps towards building my connection to God and will certainly have more questions to ask here on Shia Islam.

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@Kilij Allahu Akbar :cuddle: May Allah (swt) continue to make your path to Islam virtuous and fruitful. Btw check out the lectures in the link in my signature, they'll really help you with your journey inshallah. 

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Directed at? Perhaps, but I am more than happy to hear from other perspectives. (^_^)

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Well, in some cases organized religion can do more harm than good. I dont really need to go into detail, this is sort of a given (just read the news sometime). However, at least in my experience, through church I found like minded people. Christians with varying mind sets, some more conservative, some more open and secular, some with more liberal interpretations, some with stronger conservative ideas. A fairly nice mix.

But, through the experience of becoming involved with the church, collectively with others, i find myself being more productive in doing "good" things. Not that I wasnt a good person before i became more religious. But the church helped in directing that "good" productivity. For example, i find myself out helping the community more frequently, feeding and clothing homeless, shoveling snow, raking leaves, helping people who genuinely could use a hand.

Also, im not one to preach but...

 In regards to Christ, when I heard stories of how compassionate He was, and the sacrifices He made and what He taught, personally i felt inspired.  Whether or not he literally turned one loaf of bread and one fish into thousands to feed the hungry I think is up for debate, but the compassion He demonstrated in stories like this, are unarguably remarkable. When he healed a man who was coming to capture Him and to have him nailed to the cross. Who would ever heal someone who planned to have them killed? And to go further and to request forgiveness of their sin? And to die for our sins so that we wouldnt have to hold that weight on our own shoulders? Every fault, every weakness or mistake, every wrong doing that we turn and regret. Christ died so that we may find eternal peace despite our own shortcomings. There is no real reason to feel sad in life with that in mind.

I imagine only other christians would understand.

Anyway, the moral philosophy of an organized religion can work in conjunction with your own pre existing philosophy.  You can acquire a sort of multi perspective outlook on life and it is possible it could help you grow.  If you get involved with the wrong crowd though, it can ruin you. So, safe travels!

Edited by iCambrian
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Just a side note as well, Christianity can be a very open religion as well. At least here in the US. There are far more people interested in unity of the church and supporting one another, than there are christians who are going to tell you youre going to burn in a lake of fire. There are more christians who welcome open interpretations, than people who will shut you out and view you as a heretic. 

I know communities can vary, but I did not feel the same way in the couple years I had been practicing or at least learning to practice as a muslim.

But im sure it all depends on where you live and whos around you. Ive met very open and liberal muslims just the same.

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Definitely true, I have Christian friends too(of the "more open and secular" variety), and their faith definitely inspires them to good deeds and compassion. I also know personally some non-Christians who still look to Christ; Muslims, Hindus, East Asians, and even irreligious. I assume it is not uncommon for Muslims to read the Gospels and take Christ as an example of virtue, though I don't know to what extent or how common, also as I mentioned before, I myself find the Psalms very motivating. As for communities, yes there'll be good and corrupted ones in any religion, but I worry not since I won't accept injustice and oppression no matter who it comes from. We live in crazy times, the world is on fire, and I worry about humanity than I do of burning in a lake of fire, not because I question that there are those who will face that destiny(and it is easily to tell what kind of people will, IMHO), but because being a just and virtuous person is the right path, not just simply being in this religious community or the other. I am still learning, but the Ahlul-Bayt have all the right values and selflessness that I have come to truly admire from the heart, thus I have come to the path to Shia Islam.

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On 4/24/2016 at 5:07 AM, Kilij said:

Hello, Kilij here.

This is just as an FYI.


Worship is not what we usually understand it to be. Unlike other religions, Islam is not only a personal connection/relationship with Allah[awj]. You would need to look at this form a point of view of individual/community/society/state level [simultaneously]. Islam has role models [Prophet Muhammad[pbuhahp] and Ahlul Bayt[as]] that we need to follow - they are the way to Allah[awj]

[Qur'an51:56] I created the jinn and humankind only that they might worship Me.
[Pooya/Ali Commentary 51:56]

Refer to Sad: 27. Imam Jafar bin Muhammad As Sadiq said:

"Allah created man and gave him faculties of observation and contemplation to acquire knowledge with which he understands the manifestation of His power and then submits to Him."

Without knowledge man's adoration of Allah has no real worth. The actual meaning of adoration is not the performance of rituals or a few prescribed formal prayers, recited by the mouth. Adoration involves surrender of ego, self-control and discipline, so that he acts only in consonance with the expressed will of Allah, by abiding with His commands. The whole life-activity of the individual should be nothing but the fulfilment of the will of Allah.

"Say: Verily my prayer and my sacrifice, and my life and my death (all) are for the Lord of the worlds." (An-am: 163)

Aqa Mahdi Puya says:

This is the purpose of creation, as expressed in the holy book-to act according to the will and the command of Allah. The most perfect form of action is the absolute submission to His will, that is, Islam. Therefore of the creatures, whoever is better in manifesting His will and His command throughout life, will be closer to the purpose of creation, and therefore nearer to Him. The more perfect in obedience will be nearer to the creator, and the closer they are to Him, the more perfect they will be in the order of creation.

http://quran.al-islam.org/

You see, we can’t only petition God, to solve individual/world problems. God does not come down to earth to solve problems. Petition requires action at individual and community level. You are concerned with what is going on with the suffering in the world. Here, is a letter, if the instruction were to be truly implement. You will see a solution at hand.

Letter 53: An order to Malik al-Ashtar

http://www.al-islam.org/nahjul-balagha-part-2-letters-and-sayings/letter-53-order-malik-al-ashtar

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Salam Alaikum

You can worship two things 1. Allah 2. Your Nafs.

If you worsip your nufs then it will make you animal even more below then animals.

If you worship Allah with sincerity then it will take to the highest levels of creation.

Above users reply are excellent. You can not find any one else to worship except Allah.

Two things are built in in you Fujur and Taqwa (sura Shams).

Fujur is the path of satan

Taqwa is the path towards God. 

May Allah Guide us ameen

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