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Neval

What Life Is Like In Iran?

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So as a Turk i have never been to Iran before.But it is one of the countries that fascinates me with it's rich culture and history to be honest.But i dont have quite a lot knowledge about daily life in Iran today.

What do you eat?

What Iranians enjoy doing the most when they have free time?

Simply how is it going in Iran?

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It is so similar to the daily life here.We drink and eat the same things(most of them)But instead of all i would eat menemen for breakfast.

 

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it might not look so appetizing but it is the food from heaven.Plus it is so easy to make.

Here is the recipe.Maybe you friends would like to try to make menemen for breakfast i thought and im posting it.

Ingredients:

  • 6-7 green peppers,
  • 3 tomatoes,
  • 4 eggs,
  • 1/4 cup olive oil,
  • 1 teaspoon salt.

Preparation:

  1. Cut the peppers and tomatoes into cubes,
  2. Heat the oil in a pan,
  3. Add the peppers and cook on low heat until softened,
  4. Add the tomatoes and cook until softened,
  5. In a bowl whisk together the eggs and salt,
  6. Add the beaten eggs into the pan,
  7. Cook on low heat (lid on) without stirring, but ensuring that eggs get in between the vegetables,
  8. Remove from heat once the egg solidifies.

Bon appétit…

 

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oh really?my dreams are shatterd!!!!lol

for a moment i thought it was something only we had.seems like our precious menemen is not that precious at all.

dont tell me you eat simit for breakfast too?what about sucuklu yumurta?:grin:

 

simitttttt.jpg

simit

 

sucuklu_yumurta_94632.jpg

sucuklu yumurta

Edited by Neval

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Sucuklu yumrta has nothing to do with turkish food. Its a famous English / German ham and egg breakfast. They must have replaced ham with something else, maybe turkey. Menemen is omelet with veggies, again not the origin of turkey. 

Sister Neval, to your surprise, there is seldom anything authentic with Turkish. Most of current and old turkish culture is adapted from Persian, Arab, European, and a mix of Anatolian nomadic traditions. Nonetheless its always a treat to visit Turkey as whatever it was, it has evolved into this crossroad of so many different traditions worth experiencing at least once. 

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31 minutes ago, Irfani313 said:

Sucuklu yumrta has nothing to do with turkish food. Its a famous English / German ham and egg breakfast. They must have replaced ham with something else, maybe turkey. Menemen is omelet with veggies, again not the origin of turkey. 

Sister Neval, to your surprise, there is seldom anything authentic with Turkish. Most of current and old turkish culture is adapted from Persian, Arab, European, and a mix of Anatolian nomadic traditions. Nonetheless its always a treat to visit Turkey as whatever it was, it has evolved into this crossroad of so many different traditions worth experiencing at least once. 

Pretty much true. I mean much of Turkish culture, traditions and food isn't at all original and instead borrowed from elsewhere even if Turks insist it's not the case. The only thing different is the language and that's pretty much it. The Turkish and Azeri are pretty much new and foreign to the region like less they have existed in places like Iran, Anatolia and Azerbaijanfor less than 800 years old, the Turkic languages originally came from around the mountain ranges of Mongolia and China. But with the Mongols and their allies the Turkic tribes, migrated gradually into Azerbaijan, Iran and Anatolia and spread their language among the local populations. 

Mosts Azeris in Iran and Azerbaijan used to speak a native language called Azari. The names of the languages don't look at all any different no doubt, in that Azari was an Iranian Indo-European language similar to Kurdish, Talysh and Tati but soon after the Ottomans kicked out the Shia Kizibash tribes from Anatolia in the 1500s - 1600s they all migrated as refugees to Iran and Azerbaijan and spread their dialect of Turkish which was renamed Azeri after the old language of the region which went later extinct.

Turks have wreaked havoc from all the way from Anatolia to Caucasus to Iran and to Central. In that they displaced so many native languages, cultures and populations. Even as far recent as the Armenian Genocide!

 

 

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Life in Iran varies a lot according to the provinces. However, as far as Tehran is concerned, what I hear is that it is very much a big city. A lot of time and effort is spent just getting around. Communications are important, everyone is on their tablets or phones. Tehranis dress well, and there are a great number of fashion shops. Plenty of cafes, and it is easy to get up a conversation with someone in a cafe. Iranians are not all that religious, in the public sense. There is a lot of demonstrated religion in shrine cities like Qum and Meshed. Elsewhere, the clergy seem to be automatically respected, but it is as if they do it for the others, who are taken up with secular concerns.

All this is generalising, you understand.

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Of course Turks got into a cultural interaction with other races.Such as Persians and Arabs.Well i was very suprised when i learnt that most of our religious terms were persian actually.

For example ablution.

We say abdest which is a persian word but a friend of mine told me that in Iran they use the arabic for word for abdest.Ironic isnt it!

 

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On 23.01.2016 at 2:37 AM, John Al-Ameli said:

Never been there, but what I know of who visited. Its just like any other place in the world.

But there must be something different.Even a tiny difference.Then how would we call it Iran?Something that makes it Iran i think.

But afterall it is just a normal country just like any other...

Edited by Neval

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I found a nice text of a Pakistani tourist about Iran:

Quote


I have visited Iran, never lived there. A few of my friends have worked there as well. So I have only a limited idea of what it is like to live in Iran. That being said, I believe I can give the readers a better picture than what media tells you.

Iran is an Islamic Republic. The Islamic law is enforced. Most people support it and they helped bring the revolution. Points below should be read with this in mind.

1. Iran is safe. The ratio of crime is very low. Criminals are dealt with very strictly. The police is very friendly and it is easy to get swift justice.

2. Iran is not backwards. Cities like Tehran and Mashhad are very well developed with all facilities you will find in modern cities of the world. The road, railway and aviation infrastructure is well established.

 

Ref. : https://www.quora.com/Whats-it-like-to-live-in-Iran
3. People support the government. Millions and millions of people take the streets when the government give them a call to do so. People support the policies and are willing to face the sufferings which come with them.

4. Irani people are not extremists. They are a lot more liberal than people of Pakistan. (I am a Pakistani so I can tell) Irani youth likes to dress well and look good and most of the time, moral police is also fine with it.

5. Mullahs don't make illogical decisions. Their policies are backed by very strong logical arguments. If you want to read more on this, I would recommend a book called "The Ayatollah Begs to Differ".

6. The moral police enforces certain rules and there have been events when they have clearly made wrong decisions. But generally, they act in a reasonable manner.

7. Iran is a very tourist friendly country. Food items and hotels are cheap, readily available and are of good quality. There are a lots of places to see and experience in Iran.

8. Iran has preserved historic and cultural monuments and landmarks from different religions and cultures. They have not resorted to destroy them like Taliban in Afghanistan or Saudis in Saudi Arabia. Iran promotes tourism to these places as well.

9. Iran has a history of overcoming sanctions. They plan and act to diffuse the constraints and they have done it successfully for past several decades. If you visit Iran, you will generally not feel at all that this country is facing sanctions. Some aspects however do show it: availability of modern cars and smart phones.

10. Iran has a huge internet firewall similar to the one in China. Most social sites are blocked, but this is now changing slowly.

11. Women are not oppressed or anything. As far as I observed, women worked and roamed freely in all kinds of places. The literacy rate of women is a lot more than most other Muslim countries.

 

 

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