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Haji 2003

Anti-ISIS Arbaeen march gets little press coverage

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Organisers of an anti-Isis march in London have spoken of their frustration after mainstream media outlets failed to cover the demonstration.

Although Shia Muslims take part in the march each year to mark the Arbaeen, or mourning, anniversary of Imam Husain - a seventh-century leader who fought for social justice - this year organisers decided to use the event as a platform to denounce terrorism following the recent Isis attacks in Paris, Beirut and elsewhere.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/muslim-anti-isis-march-not-covered-by-mainstream-media-outlets-say-organisers-a6765976.html

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Yeah, don't read the comments though. Bunch of sectarian nonsense, and mostly from non Muslims who think Shias are "5%" of the Muslim population and are "sworn enemies" of the Sunnis. They call protests against Daesh, protests against the Sunnis. -_-

 

non Muslims love to drive the sectarian rhetoric

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And then, the ignorant people complain how "Muslims don't denounce terrorism" :blabla: Not our fault that the media doesn't deem these events as "sensational" enough to cover them.

 

Pond: Well, this happens when people think they can judge something they have no knowledge of beyond what the media sprouts. No wonder we are told not to speak of matters we don't have knowledge of... And anyway, I find these comments more amusing than irritating; they seem to know more about us, our reasons and beliefs than we do :rolleyes: Shows you the state of mind many humans are in, in this time and age.

 

"The most complete gift of God is a life based on knowledge.

The innumerable fools have made the learned very scarce."

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5 hours ago, ~ThePond~ said:

They call protests against Daesh, protests against the Sunnis. -_-

 

I don't know how many non-Muslims hold this view but I have many times seen hardliner Sunnis (or Wahhabis) taking this position. Even the fight against Daesh is characterised as Shia enemies fighting the Sunnis. This shows that a considerable section of Sunnis insists on seeing the war through exclusive sectarian lens. Which is really their problem not Shias'.

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46 minutes ago, Marbles said:

 

I don't know how many non-Muslims hold this view but I have many times seen hardliner Sunnis (or Wahhabis) taking this position. Even the fight against Daesh is characterised as Shia enemies fighting the Sunnis. This shows that a considerable section of Sunnis insists on seeing the war through exclusive sectarian lens. Which is really their problem not Shias'.

I see this view very often, especially portrayed in the media. In fact, a student I know who is also in the education field with me is doing a lesson on the Kite Runner, and is having students gather contextual information about Muslim and Islam, and he literally tells the students "why have the Sunnis and Shias seemed to be killing each other throughout all of history?" He is driving this awful rhetoric to white rural students who have no conception of Islam.  All they will think now is that the Muslim community is inherently violent, and everyone hates everyone who disagrees with him. Time magazine published an article "Sunni, Shia: Why they Hate Each Other." Hm, didn't know we were sworn mortal enemies, but that must be the truth since the media reports it.  Hardliner "Sunnis," contradict the many tenets of Sunni Islam, therefore, I would consider them contradicting the many beliefs of the traditional Sunni school.  Daesh considers that to be the paradigm because that is among the many purposes of Daesh, to drive sectarian conflict and instigate a war to essentially destroy Islam. Daesh is among the greatest threats to unity among Muslims.

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Well, haters are gonna hate regardless but the important thing is that these rallies continue. The press can't hide it forever. As Shia we need to let the world know that it is Sunni extremists causing the problems and not Shia. We need to also continue advertising the fact that we also are/have been the victims of Sunni attacks for centuries. 

 

This will serve 2 purposes. First, it will educate the world on how we are not only seperate from Sunni extremists but that we are wholly opposed to it. Secondly, any time the name of Shia gets out there it will only serve to get the message of Imam Husain (as) and Karbala out for the world to know. 

 

The time has passed for Shia to sit idly by while Sunni lead the world into chaos. At the very least we need to stage protests and make our voices heard.

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You know what's more frustrating...the greatest victims at the hands of these lunatics are Muslims themselves. In fact they have been for centuries! Yet ordinary Muslims are blamed and Islam is demonically exhibited through various illustrations and keywords which has now become the norm.

Kill a million Muslims and it's sectarian violence or Western collateral damage. Kill one European its an attack on Western freedoms and thus the War machine is unleashed without brakes. The Free Press? I guess they just follow hand in hand, refueling the nuts and bolts.

Only recently a popular radio channel, LBC in the UK, ran a storm with callers ringing in. Topic: Should Muslims do more?. Oh pls. I had to ring in with a suggestion 'wrong topic buddy, should the West do less in arming these lunatics and aiding their survival with the support of their Wahabi Allies in the Middle East'. At least, we could meet half way, the West can drop down a notch and maybe we can push a little more, like hold white peace flags and run around with flowers in our hair.

 

 

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