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diyaa110

What Does This Stanza Mean ?

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Its taken from Nadeem sarwar's noha "Aisa Alam hai kahan" on Hazrat Abbas .as. I want to know what the third stanza means.

 

Hum to sag-e-darbar-e-ALi hain, khaas ye tujh se rishta hai

Jad bhi hai tera kul ka mola, tu bhi humara aaqa hai

Tere faqeeron mein ay ghazi Arsh Nasheen bhi rehta hai

Sindh mein aao mola qadam pe lal qalandar kehta hai

Aisa alam hai kahan, aisa jawaan hai kahan...

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You mean the third line which you emboldened?

 

It will be translated as, "Among your beggars, O ghazi, are counted the dwellers of skies".

 

This may mean, "the creatures who dwell in the skies come to beg at your door."

 

It's an odd sentence if it is like this.

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Tere faqeeron mein ay ghazi Arsh Nasheen bhi rehta hai

 

You mean the third line which you emboldened?

 

It will be translated as, "Among your beggars, O ghazi, are counted the dwellers of skies".

 

This may mean, "the creatures who dwell in the skies come to beg at your door."

 

It's an odd sentence if it is like this.

It is clearly not referring to plural but singular i.e Dweller of the Arsh,

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It is clearly not referring to plural but singular i.e Dweller of the Arsh,

It could be used singular or plural, as poetic license. Unless it refers to specific single entity I'm not aware of.

 

Does it mean the prophets and messengers?

I asked my mom and she said that generally speaking Arsh Nasheen means God, but that can't be right, right ? Its the reason I'm enquiring.

Arsh Nasheen literally means the one who sits on the sky. It's used for Allah. But obviously that's not the verse means. Allah can't be the Ghazi's beggar. And I think it's fair to say that it also doesn't means prophets and messengers. One, arsh nasheen is not a term used for prophets. And two, calling prophets as beggars of Ghazi has problems of ascribing status in the theology. This term most commonly refers to angels, who sit, and therefore, exist/live in the skies.

Edited by Marbles

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Arsh Nasheen when used in poetry would mean someone having very high position. 

 

Reference: http://www.urduencyclopedia.org/urdudictionary/index.php?title=%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%B4_%D9%86%D8%B4%DB%8C%DA%BA

 

Faqir also doesn't necessarily mean beggar. It has other meanings besides the known meaning of beggar. It could mean down to earth kind of a person or darwaish, khaksaar, etc.

 

The meaning is not very evident from the lines you have posted. One reason is the use of poor grammar. If the poet meant something like: "tere faqiroon mai, ay Ghazi, arsh-nasheen bhi hota hai," so either he is referring to Lal-Qalandar as arsh-nasheen or to himself. 

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I think the only problem is that Arsh usually and very commonly refers to the Throne of Allah, even in Arabic and even through Quranic references. Thus, the very likely candidate for Arsh Nasheen is Allah but I do hope it is like you people say and the poet wasn't exaggerating big time. Since there's possibility it can mean angels or other high ranked people I'll leave it at that. 

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