Abu Hadi

Reverts to Islam [OFFICIAL THREAD]

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12 minutes ago, HGW_XX/7 said:

Unity of God
Justice of God

Prophethood
Imamate
Final Day of judhment

Bold has some differences, philosophical differences
Justice philosophy leads to freedom of man, thus a corrupt monarch can't use argument of Gods will in his favor for whatever wrong he do.

Shias donot recognize frst 3 caliphs as righteous, but most importantly6th caliph muahwiya is considered Upsurper (but Imam Hassan accepted him defacto for practical reasons).

When he appointed his son as next caliph, that eventually led to Karbals

Saudi chief cleric even today says Yazid was legitmate ruler and Imam Hussain should not have led the rebellion

This legitimacy argument which is bullsh*t by western standards was used to get Edicts from Clergy to legitimize killing Imam Hussain

You can see where its leading, hard sunni believes will not allow you to enjoy things like Freedom of Speech, Freedom to protest etc as unfortunately those things were crushed in early islam and that history is part of their believe system.

Amar bil Maroof nahi an al munkar (promote truth/right. stop wrong), which for shia are obligatory (i think for sunnis as well) is comparable to Freedom of Speech and protest.

Basically issues are debatable today but they can not agree to a  reasoning that will lead them to denounce muahwiya, his rule, even rule of 1st 3 caliphs, sins of many Sahabis etc. While its much easier for shias to curse muahwiya and other sahabs who did many wrong things, because for us no sahaba has some special exaclted status like our imams.

And there is no such controversy about our 12 imams.

But as Sunni justify 1st 3 caliphs and muahwiya for being sahabi, they ignor many other proven things that sahaba did.

Basically a lot of double think

JazakAllah for that piece of knowledge. May I ask, are you Sunni or Shia? 

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13 hours ago, HGW_XX/7 said:

Shias donot recognize frst 3 caliphs as righteous, but most importantly6th caliph muahwiya is considered Upsurper (but Imam Hassan accepted him defacto for practical reasons).

When he appointed his son as next caliph, that eventually led to Karbals

Saudi chief cleric even today says Yazid was legitmate ruler and Imam Hussain should not have led the rebellion

I believe the reason Imam Hassan(AS) "accepted" muahwiyas leadership  was in order to show people what kind of "calpihs" the unrightful rulers was, they agreed that leadership would not be passed on to muahwiyas son but that it would return to Imam Hassan(AS), as we now know, they assassinated the Imam and muawiyas son yazid got the leadership.

This lead to the actions of Imam Hussein(AS), he did what he did in order to again show us what kind of "calphis" the unrightful rulers was. If you doubt to who was right, just look at the events of Karbala, if you have a heart in your chest and a brain in your skull you cannot argue regarding the wrongdoing that was done to the family of the Prophet, to our Imam.

As in the case of Imam Hassan(AS), he showed us how the enemy was wrong in their words.

As in the case of Imam Hussein(AS), he showed us how the enemy was wrong in their actions.

With their blood they made it clear for us, so that he who searches and reasons may see truth among the mists of lies but it is up to us to search and reason. For me, one of the absolute major reasons to why I decided to follow Shia islam over Sunni islam was the events of Karbala and the events that lead to it. It is not a question of picking sects, it is a question of picking truth and there can only be one truth.

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14 hours ago, RevertSister said:

Has anyone got any links for comparing the Sunni belief and Shia belief, as to what is the major difference between the two.

 JazakAllah in advance :) 

There's more, alot more....be prepared to be stunned. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Szj3GaYXJQ&list=PLVC7olsi0U34hld6api5Xjr8GJhuVuZi8

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18 hours ago, RevertSister said:

JazakAllah for that piece of knowledge. May I ask, are you Sunni or Shia? 

Shia by birth in a predominantly Suni muslim country.

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On 2/8/2016 at 3:20 AM, RevertSister said:

Has anyone got any links for comparing the Sunni belief and Shia belief, as to what is the major difference between the two.

 JazakAllah in advance :) 

http://www.al-islam.org/feature/explore-shia-sunni

When you open it, you will find some useful links to the left under "Explore Shia & Sunni"

May Allah bless your path.

Endtimes and IbnSina like this

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On ‎2‎/‎5‎/‎2016 at 3:48 AM, RevertSister said:

I'm white British along with my parents, I believe we are not supposed to be divided into such sects.

The Quran says, 

"And hold fast,

All together, by the rope, 

Which Allah ( stretches out for you ), 

and be not divided among yourselves;"

[ Al-Quran 3:103 ]

 

What is the rope of Allah that is being referred to in this verse? It is the Glorious Qur’an. The Glorious Qur’an is the rope of Allah which all Muslims should hold fast together. There is double emphasis in this verse. Besides saying ‘hold fast all together’ it also says, ‘be not divided’.

Qur’an further says,

"Obey Allah, and obey the Messenger"
                [Al-Qur’an 4:59]

 

"As for those who divide 

Their religion and break up into sects, 

thou hast no part in them in the least:

Their affair is with Allah:

He will in the end 

Tell them the truth

Of all that they did." 

[Al-Quran 6:159]

 

In this verse Allah (swt) says that one should disassociate oneself from those who divide their religion and break it up into sects.

But when one asks a Muslim, "who are you?", the common answer is either ‘I am a Sunni, or ‘I am a Shia’. Some call themselves Hanafi, or Shafi or Maliki or Humbali. Some say ‘I am a Deobandi’, while some others say ‘I am a Barelvi’.

One may ask such Muslims, "Who was our beloved prophet (pbuh)? Was he a Hanafi or a Shafi, or a Humbali or a Maliki?" No! He was a Muslim, like all the other prophets and messengers of Allah before him.

It is mentioned in chapter 3 verse 52 of Al-Qur’an that Jesus (pbuh) was a Muslim.

Further, in chapter 3 verse 67, Al-Qur’an says that Ibrahim (pbuh) was not a Jew or a Christian but was a Muslim.

 

If anyone poses a Muslim the question who are you, he should say "I am a MUSLIM, not a Hanafi or a Shafi". Surah Fussilat chapter 41 verse 33 says

    "Who is better in speech
Than one who calls (men)
To Allah, works righteousness,
And says, ‘I am of those
Who bow in Islam (Muslim)?’ "

               [Al-Qur’an 41:33]

The Qur’an says "Say I am of those who bow in Islam". In other words, say, "I am a Muslim".

 

We must respect all the great scholars of Islam, including the four Imaams, Imam Abu Hanifa, Imam Shafi, Imam Humbal and Imam Malik (may Allah be pleased with them all). They were great scholars and may Allah reward them for their research and hardwork. One can have no objection if someone agrees with the views and research of Imam Abu Hanifa or Imam Shafi, etc. But when posed a question, ‘who are you?’, the reply should only be ‘I am a Muslim’.


Some may argue by quoting the hadith of our beloved Prophet from Sunan Abu Dawood Hadith No. 4579. In this hadith the prophet (pbuh) is reported to have said, "My community will be split up into seventy-three sects."

This hadith reports that the prophet predicted the emergence of seventy-three sects. He did not say that Muslims should be active in dividing themselves into sects. The Glorious Qur’an commands us not to create sects.

The Glorious Qur’an mentions in several verses, "Obey Allah and obey His Messenger". A true Muslim should only follow the Glorious Qur’an. He can agree with the views of any scholar as long as they conform to the teachings of the Qur’an. If such views go against the Word of Allah, or the Sunnah of His Prophet, then they carry no weight, regardless of how learned the scholar might be.

as salaam alaikum, and if I've offended anyone please forgive me. 

 

 

bismillah.gif.59bff9d7911f447abf7f0e7977

salam1.jpg.ccd9cd1f80d55d59215bbc2a62c18

Dear sister in Islam. Congratulations and welcome to Islam. Shia is not a sect, people make you think its a sect. Who knows the Holy Quran than the last Prophet and messenger,  Mohammad s.a.w ? It was Mohammad s.a.w. that said: "I will leave you two weighty things for Umma to follow, 1) the Holy Quran, 2) and my Ahlul Bait(my family/household) follow these two and you will never go astray. The Prophet did not say this out of choice, but this was Allah's command! Other than that, I 100 % agree with you where we should say, we are Muslims. Good luck to sister and I pray to Allah s.w.t to keep guiding you and make you stay on the right path INSHALLAH.

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On 09/02/2016 at 1:32 AM, Abu Hadi said:

There's more, alot more....be prepared to be stunned. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Szj3GaYXJQ&list=PLVC7olsi0U34hld6api5Xjr8GJhuVuZi8

Thank you for this link.  I'm watching the first video.  I know I really shouldn't say what I'm about to say.  I'm feeling very angry at this Abdul Raheem Green whoever he is.  He strikes me as a bit of an intellectual retard. (Forgive me).

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In the Name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful 

If you are are a revert to Islam and have never fasted before or have only fasted for one or two years, please heed the following advice, you might find it useful. 

Being a revert to Islam, from a Christian upbringing and reverted in my early 20's, the first few years of fasting were very difficult for me. Every year, as the next Ramadan approached, I tried to think of ways that I could make the fasting easier on myself. It is difficult to fully appreciate the spirituality of the Holy Month if you are tired and aggravated thru most of it. For most of us who live in North America, this Ramadan will probably be the longest in terms of hours of daylight we need to keep the fast, and most of us cannot adjust our work schedules just for Ramadan, and most employers and schools are not willing to make accommodations for us. This is unfortunate, but there are still things you can do in order to get thru and not just survive but thrive during this Holy Month. So here are some tips that I have learned, mostly thru trial and error in order to get thru it. The key is preparation, and you still have time to prepare. 

1) Caffeine. 

I drink a lot of coffee and tea. While this doesn't cause me any major issues for most of the time, it does when I am fasting. I used to get massive headaches and sometimes body aches which used to affect me at work. There are two solutions I found to lessen this

A) Cut down caffeine consumption before Ramadan begins. I usually start in the beginning of Rajab (which is a few days away now) to gradually decrease the amounts. So instead of drinking two cups of tea in the morning, I only drink one. Instead of having a cup of coffee in the car on my way to work, I skip it and just have a cup when I get to work. So by the time Ramadan begins, I am only drinking maybe two or three cups a day (instead of my usual 6 or 7). 

B) Get up for Suhur (pre-dawn meal) and eat or at least drink something. The best thing to do is drink as much water as you can fit in your stomach. I usually drink two to three large glasses. This helps you stay hydrated and avoid the headaches. 

2) Eating

I start to change my eating schedule beginning in Rajab. I try to eat less during the day. So I will first cut in half the amount of food I eat for breakfast. Then the amount I eat for lunch I will also cut down. This way your body gradually gets used to the idea that no food is coming during the daytime. In addition, I will delay my meals, so if I normally eat lunch at 12:00, I will wait till 1 or 1:30 instead. If you do this, when you start fasting, it won't be such a huge shock for your body and you can concentrate more fully on the spirituality of the month. 

3) Sleeping. 

The biggest problem for people like me, who are early risers, is sleep during Ramadan. My body naturally gets up around 5:30 or 6 in the morning. But during Ramadan, this type of schedule actually works against you since you are probably staying up later eating and going to gatherings and you run the risk of getting sleep deprived. Just as with the other things, I start to accustom myself to staying up later and waking up only when I have to for work and not earlier than that, so that I get enough sleep. 

4) Extra (mustahab) Fasting. 

It is highly recommended to fast, at least a few days during Rajab and Shaban (the two month before Ramada). Not only will this give you spiritual benefits, but it will also give you physical benefits by preparing your body for the month when you will be fasting every day. Although this is not for everyone, if you are able, try to fast as many days as you can before the month begins, and especially during the two named months, as they are very Holy Month, almost as much as Ramadan itself. 

If you do these things, you will feel better physically and thus will have more energy to concentrate on the most important aspect of Ramadan which is doing Ibadat(worship) in order to get closer to Allah(s.w.a) and your physical discomfort will not hold you back from this.

If anyone else has some useful tips, please share. 

Salam. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Abu Hadi

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 Deffo best to cut right down on the caffeine (incuding fizzy drinks) before hand so you dont get the withdrawal. The problem with filling up with water is that it can disturb sleep (waking up to go to the loo) if youre going back to sleep after suhur. I recommend eating protein at suhur and/or slow release carbs like porridge. Also, thrist and hunger comes and goes. One moment you can feel so thristy that you fear it may become unbearable, then a short time later you feel fine again (alhamdullillah). Im not sure why that happens, anyone know?

 

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I live in Michigan and we are fasting 18 hrs plus this year. So the water thing is important for us !

But if it might disturb your sleep then drink less. 

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As a naturally born Muslim.

For Ramadan, I usually go to a mosque for iftar. Then I stay up during the night going on the internet checking the Super Mario Boards, GameFAQs, and checking ShiaChat alongside posting on those places to pass my time & watching YouTube. When suhoor time hits, I start eating.

I could say that going at mosque for Iftar is the best way to go about and then staying up for suhoor. I like to eat some leftovers as well.

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Having some plain yogurt with suhoor helps with thirst. Using a tablespoon or two of molasses (maybe in your coffee or oatmeal) keeps hunger at bay. Definitely drink plenty of water and juice, and make sure you have fiber rich slowly digested foods and avoid much sweet or greasy/oily foods in the early meal.

The hardest thing for me is that the long days of fasting make my metabolism slow and by iftar time I'd rather sleep than eat. Actually, I always want to sleep by the middle of the third week, and I have to force myself to eat anything for any meal. And I gain 10 lbs. 

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You usually have 6-7 cups of coffee...?! And I thought I was caffed up

Try swapping green tea for some of those cups....it's really good for us.

may Allah (swt) help us all....

The rewards for fasting in rajab and shaban have been extremely emphasized, and are famously know as the months of preparation. Not only preparing yourself physically, but mentally as well. I've even heard of scholars preparing for the following Ramadan right when that Ramadan is over--that's how precious each second of Ramadan is, and the importance of having the right mindset. Don't lose time because your body has to still adjust to the routine.

Use these two months to prepare Insha'Allah.

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Ah Wow!! 18 Hours!!!! And i certainly didn't know that some muslims starts preparing for the month of ramadan this early.

What i find interesting is that till this very day i'm still discovering how much important Month of Ramadan is. I live in a christian household, they found out about my conversion 1 years ago and since then (Because I'm still a fresh graduate and my salary isn't enough for me to move out and live alone) I've been struggling with them telling them convincing them that I'm a christian again because they wanted to kick me out of the house and causing me numerous problems that i don't need to mention...

So when it comes to Ramadan i should fast covering it all up without them noticing it which is the hard part because my parents were watching every step i make. And truly my brothers and sisters, with the Grace of God with His power with His blessing they were blinded to the fact that I was staying without no food nor water for 15 hours plus a day. Just because I jumped and took the risk for God tho i was afraid, He was there for me. We should have a strong faith in Allah, because when we understand His power, when we, as committing shia believers, understand the power that is behind us we would never have to fear anything ever again.

I usually find it hard to fast the first two days cause of the headaches and dizziness, but after that I manage to pass normally the month. And i don't even eat during Sahr, because if i wake up during the night to eat my parents will notice, so i manage to fast each day on a one meal.

This is my third Ramadan and Insha'Allah it will be Alright. With the help of God and with our faith everything can be done.

Abu Hadi, Zahra1 and Sumayyeh like this

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6 hours ago, HayderM said:

All of my end of year exams are in Ramadan, every one of them! Have to get prepared :pushup::pushup2: 

Same here buddy! And I normally take chocolate into my exams as a snack :( I guess I'll just bring a tasbih instead :hahaha:

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1 hour ago, zainabamy said:

Same here buddy! And I normally take chocolate into my exams as a snack :( I guess I'll just bring a tasbih instead :hahaha:

Ahh yeah I see ur from the UK so we will be fasting the same duration! Hopefully it goes by easy, im expecting first couple days as a challenge, studying in the library at like 2/3am everyone will think iv'e lost it :einstein::clap:

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14 hours ago, yasahebalzaman.313 said:

And i don't even eat during Sahr, because if i wake up during the night to eat my parents will notice

Oh please at least take a large bottle of water and a granola bar or some fruit into your room before you sleep and eat it before fajr time! May your hard efforts be rewarded! If I tried to start fast on an empty stomach I would faint by noon!

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Wish we could all have the Saudi schedule during Ramadan, 

Get up at 11 am, go harass your secretary for a few hours,

throw a few taekwondo punches,

leave the office,

Do Salat Dhuhr, take a nap,

wake up for Salat Asr, take another nap,

Then time to eat a whole cow and fall into a diabetic coma at 3 am.

Then wake up the next day and do it all again. 

 

Edited by Abu Hadi

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I keep planning to cut out my afternoon coffee, and each day afternoon comes and I decide to wait one more day. I drink only two cups per day, but I'm as addicted as if I were in the habit of having a whole pot.

 

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