Jump to content
Ruq

Favourite Word Of The Day

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Ambergris: A solid, waxy solid found in the intestine of sperm whale, it has been used over the centuries in perfumes and potions, or as a spice *pukes*

Edited by Durr-e-Najjaf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Queer - a word I'm fixated with because I can never pronounce it properly even after listening to its pronunciation multiple times on Merriam-Webster. Kew-er or kew-eer or kuweer or kuwee-er? :wacko:

It is pronounced exactly as it is spelled, one syllable, "kweer". I just realized the Q u combination serves no real purpose in English.

I have at least two doppelgangers.

My word of the day is discombobulate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, today I heard a person confuse petulance with pestilence.

 

Ordinarily, Pakis confuse ordinance and ordnance. Once I read the wrong word in a newspaper of note!

 

There, we have four words for the day.

 

(Do I need to give their definitions to SCers? I don't think so)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shlep - Yiddish term for carrying or dragging something around that is no good to you, or something like that.

 

Other Yiddish words i like:

 

Meshugah - crazy

 

Klutz - clumsy person.

 

schnook - easily manipulated person

 

Cool.

 

Are these words already incorporated into the language and to be found in English dictionaries? Or do they remain explicitly foreign?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool.

 

Are these words already incorporated into the language and to be found in English dictionaries? Or do they remain explicitly foreign?

 

Im looking at a list of Yiddish words and the ones i hear used in UK by non-jews commonly are:

 

'schnozz'/ schnozzle (nose)

'nosh' (food)

'chutzpah' (audacity)

'glitch' (minor malfunction)

'klutz'

'schmaltz' (overly sentimental)

'schmooz' ('small talk')

'schmuck' ('fool')

'schtik' (i think it means 'act' or something similar)

'spiel' (persuasive story)

spritz' (spray of liquid)

'tush' (bum)

 

I dont know how many of them came from the Jewish community in this country and how much from the influence of American entertainment.

 

The ones i recognise exclusively from American films/tv/authors are:

 

Meshugga

Shlep

Mensch (honourable person)

shnook

schmo (foolish person)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×