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Salam,

So every year when I start fasting, I get headaches every day for the first one or two weeks of Ramadan.

They last for about 2 to 3 hours when I first wake up and sometimes I also get them at the end of the day before iftar. Here are the things I have tried. (Also, yes I drink tea in the morning, but I don't think my headaches are totally related to caffine withdrawls)

1) Waking up for suhoor and eathing

2) Not eating for suhoor

3) Drinking tea for suhoor

4) Not drinking tea for suhoor

5) Drinking lots of water (4 to 5 glasses) for suhoor and not eating.

Any suggestions.

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(wasalam)

Since you are saying they start in the first two weeks of the Holy month, why not start two weeks before the first of Ramadan? That way in Ramadan you shall be fine, but may face some struggle in Sha'baan. Fasting is very mustahabb in Sha'baan, and the ajir for fasting certain numbers of days is 'atheem.

May Allah (swt) help you and all the brothers/sisters who deal with this :).

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It does sound like caffeine withdrawal, but if it's measly tea that doing it to you rather than manly coffee... well... (you might have to turn in your man card at the office)

Apart from that, what type of food are you eating for suhur? Definitely don't skip out on it, so scratch that option off the list. Are you eating foods high in protein? Don't know that it'd cause headaches if you lacked it but it's worth a try. Personally, I've found eggs to be the wonder food for suhur. Fasting where you've had an egg in the morning as opposed to one without is like night and day I find, especially pertinent for these times where the days are long.

Well what do ya know.. (looks like you can keep your man card):

http://www.livestron...ack-of-protein/

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First, I used to drink coffee all the time, then lost my taste for it about 2 years ago, I don't know why.

So does that mean I need a new man card ? lol

Also, I have been fasting Mon and Thurs during Shabaan. The headaches don't happen if I fast, then don't fast the next day.

They only happen when I'm fasting for consecutive days (usually starts the second or third day).

Also, I tried eating eggs and other proteins for Suhoor. If I stay up it's fine, but if I go to sleep after fajr I wake up with sour stomach. Fajr here is like at 4 a.m. so I usually go back to sleep.

I usually eat carbs for suhoor (like toast, bagel, cereal). Sometimes I don't wake up, but most of the time I do.

Even if I don't eat anything, it doesn't affect the headaches.

Does anyone else have these issues or is it just me ?

If I don't find a solution I'm just going to chalk it up to 'this is part of my jihad an nafs' but If I can find a solution it would make Ramadan more enjoyable for me.

Edited by Abu Hadi

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Oh I get horrible migraines with light sensitivity, smell sensitivity, all of it.....and I have to cook every day with that stupid lingering headache.

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Are you getting enough sleep?

Secondly, eat as much protein as you can. Don't waste your time and energy eating carb. Things that are high on glycemic index like most sugar and starch runs out of your body within two hours. Then you are out of energy.

Third, quit drinking tea or coffee in the month of Ramadhan. Drink milk if you are not lactose intolerant.

Edited by Gypsy

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I have the same problem with the headaches. Its not caffiene with me though, i think its because i have slightly low blood pressure and dehydration gives me headaches and dizziness/sickness.

I always drink as much as i can at suhoor, but i think i must sweat a lot when i sleep because im always parched when i wake up. This year i am intending to drink as much as i can and i will be making oat biscuits to have at suhoor (just made from rolled oats and a little salt). Inshallah if i stuff enough of them in and enough water they will expand in my stomach and the salt will help me retain the water. Thats my plan anyway, what d'you reckon?

How do camels work it?

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Eggs, milk, and peanut butter. Those should be three staples of everyone during Ramadan. I'd suggest drinking a few cups of gatorade in the morning, as electrolyte imbalances are a common source of headaches (along with dehydration). Also eat a banana and see if that helps. And if you can't eat eggs, eat your bagel with lots of peanut butter. Or eat several peanut butter sandwiches on 100% whole wheat bread.

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Assalam Mualaykum Brother Abu Hadi

This is just something that everyone experiences. You can try napping during the day, as the headache you are experiencing is associated to the lack of sleep, or the modification of your sleeping pattern.

May Allah (s.w.t) make it easier for all.

Gdluck :)

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salam,

Thank you all for your suggestions.

I am going to try the following and see if it works

The oat biscuits idea and lots of water

Also, I am going to try to take some ibuprofin during suhoor.

Ill let everyone know how it goes.

Also, the headaches may be a combination of caffine withdrawl and lack of sleep.

Edited by Abu Hadi

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Who knew? There's a fair few studies on this.

I think its mostly caffeine withdrawal, this happened to me last ramadan and also happens when forwhatever reason i cant get my daily dose of tea (lets just say its >4 cups). Dehydration is also probably a factor. I wouldn't gorge yourself on water the night before or in the morning because your body will adapt to that and expect it to keep comming. I would just drink a regular amount of water or maybe even slightly less than that.

Now for these, i found them quite amusing:

http://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/17255/Migraine-Exacerbation-During-Ramadan-Fasting.html

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2009.01390.x/abstract

http://www.springerlink.com/content/w237746j1tm8m812/

and particularly relevant for the olympics which unfortunately fall during ramadan http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2010/11/25/bjsm.2010.073064.extract

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I get headaches as well due to caffeine withdrawl so for the first week i take 2 tylenols at suhoor. I find tylenol to be easy to on your stomach lining compared to aspirin. You can buy oatmeal cereal or hit potbelly's for their amazing chocolate chip oatmeal cookies.

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(salam)

I'm putting my medical hat on and wouldn't advise you to take ibuprofen in the face of potential dehydration that occurs during fasting because this can cause damage to the kidneys. If you'd like an explanation of how it occurs, ask me or you could google it. Maybe you could just try phasing out the caffeine intake gradually to prevent the headaches..

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^ based on the fact that i havent really heard of such a precaution having a basis unless the person already has a degree of renal impairment or is at risk eg elderly or young people. i think abu hadi is 30-something?

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^ i doubt u would cause kidney damage unless you had poor renal function to begin with (eg a diabetic). but then again, ive always been advocate of drugs.

I also doubt you would cause kidney damage because the half-life of ibuprofen is somewhere around 2 hours. Even at prescription doses, it's virtually out of your system within 6 hours. Assuming you're drinking sufficient fluids in the morning to prepare for the day ahead, you will likely remain hydrated within safe limits for those 6 hours. And, like AR2011 said, if you have normal renal function to begin with it's even less likely to harm you.

I am not an advocate of drugs at all, and would caution against becoming dependent on them.

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^ based on the fact that i havent really heard of such a precaution..

Not really hearing about something doesn't make it untrue..

I also doubt you would cause kidney damage because the half-life of ibuprofen is somewhere around 2 hours

Ibuprofen has a dose-dependent duration of action of approximately four to eight hours, which is longer than suggested by its short half-life.

Assuming you're drinking sufficient fluids..

Assuming you're is drinking sufficient fluids and then assuming that you're sedentary throughout the day, assuming that the fasts are of very short duration, assuming one's food isn't too salty or spicy (which in turn leads to more dehydration), also assuming you're diet consists of plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables as opposed to fried or processed food, then yes, one will very likely remain hydrated within safe limits. But the problem here is that these are just too many assumptions to confidently proclaim that it won't negatively impact the renal function.

The bottomline is that fasting creates a state of dehydration, especially when the fasts are longer than usual like they are here in the west, and ingesting ibuprofen prior to beginning the fast can increase the likelihood of renal dysfunction. There are several hormonal mechanisms for making sure that the pressure on the blood is sufficient so that you make appropriate urine even when you are dehydrated. Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs mess with the hormonal control over the arterioles and essentially causes the blood to stop flowing to the glomerulus. This can cause a sharp decrease in urine and in oxygen delivery to the kidneys. Lack of oxygen kill the kidney cells in great number. The effect of NSAIDS is mitigated by adequate hydration. If you are dehydrated, the protection is gone and the effect of the NSAIDS on the hormonal control over your afferent arterioles is gone.

I get headaches as well due to caffeine withdrawl so for the first week i take 2 tylenols at suhoor.

+ 1

Tylenol is a safer alternative.

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Thank you sis,

Also, I need a good receipe for Oat Biscuits. I don't know how to make them and neither does my wife.

Please, a recipe someone has actually tried and tasted the result, lol.

Well, this is the simple recipe i used from the Greedy Gourmet site: http://www.greedygou...ttish-oatcakes/

I used rolled porridge oats and blitzed some of it and left some of it whole to make it more crunchy.

Ingredients

  • 225g (2½ cups/8 oz) medium oatmeal, plus extra for dusting
  • 1.25ml (¼ tsp) bicarbonate of soda
  • 1.25ml (¼ tsp) salt
  • 15ml (1 tbsp) unsalted butter

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/350°F/gas mark 4. Put the oatmeal, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a bowl and mix well. Heat the butter and 150ml (3/4 cup/5 oz) water in a small pan until the butter melts.
  2. Make a well in the centre of the oatmeal mix, pour in the liquid and use a palette knife to mix everything together. The mixture will initially seem a bit wet, but the oatmeal will gradually absorb all the liquid to give a soft dough.
  3. Lightly dust a clean work surface with oatmeal. Tip out the dough, then roll out to about 5mm thick. Use a small round cutter to stamp out the oatcakes or use your favourite shapes. Re-roll any trimmings and continue to cut out the biscuits. (Cut biscuits can be frozen uncooked, for up to a month. Freeze flat before packing into bags or boxes.)
  4. Brush off any excess oatmeal, then space the oatcakes over 2 baking sheets. Bake for about 20 minutes, carefully turning the oatcakes every 5 minutes or so to stop them from steaming and going stodgy. When cooked they should be crisp and lightly golden. Lift onto a wire rack and leave to cool. (Will keep in an airtight container for up to 5 days.)

They seemed to keep for ages too.

Edited by ~Ruqaya's Amal~

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Assuming you're is drinking sufficient fluids and then assuming that you're sedentary throughout the day, assuming that the fasts are of very short duration, assuming one's food isn't too salty or spicy (which in turn leads to more dehydration), also assuming you're diet consists of plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables as opposed to fried or processed food, then yes, one will very likely remain hydrated within safe limits. But the problem here is that these are just too many assumptions to confidently proclaim that it won't negatively impact the renal function.

The bottomline is that fasting creates a state of dehydration, especially when the fasts are longer than usual like they are here in the west, and ingesting ibuprofen prior to beginning the fast can increase the likelihood of renal dysfunction. There are several hormonal mechanisms for making sure that the pressure on the blood is sufficient so that you make appropriate urine even when you are dehydrated. Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs mess with the hormonal control over the arterioles and essentially causes the blood to stop flowing to the glomerulus. This can cause a sharp decrease in urine and in oxygen delivery to the kidneys. Lack of oxygen kill the kidney cells in great number. The effect of NSAIDS is mitigated by adequate hydration. If you are dehydrated, the protection is gone and the effect of the NSAIDS on the hormonal control over your afferent arterioles is gone.

Tylenol is a safer alternative.

part of the advice someone else gave was to ensure good hydration. otherwise, what u say makes perfect sense.

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Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs mess with the hormonal control over the arterioles and essentially causes the blood to stop flowing to the glomerulus. This can cause a sharp decrease in urine and in oxygen delivery to the kidneys. Lack of oxygen kill the kidney cells in great number. The effect of NSAIDS is mitigated by adequate hydration. If you are dehydrated, the protection is gone and the effect of the NSAIDS on the hormonal control over your afferent arterioles is gone.

Are you a physician or pharmacist or something? It sounds like you know what you're talking about, but I think there are a few imprecise statements here that I'll assume are due to you trying to simplify things.

Regardless, I'm not a physician, so I'll go ahead and defer to your judgement.

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