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Maryammm

Zoroastrians And Their Practices

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Salam all,

Was just wondering, does anyone know whether Zoroastrians have any dietry requirements or a dress code? I have read about their rituals, and that they have general moral requirements to be good people, but just wondered if anyone knows about the religion expounding further on that and making religion a more constant and holistic thing, do they have a religious legal system or anything?

Salams and du3as inshallah ^_^

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One of their rituals includes drinking the pee of the cow during marriage since the cow is sacred .... *yuck*

I was not asking for such answers, if you believe this to be true, then like jim jam said, bring proofs eg from zoroastrian scripture etc.

w.s

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They ate all types of meat however Eating anything in excess – gluttony – is forbidden for zoroastrians because of the importance of being constantly alert against evil

Faithandfood Fact Files - Zoroastrianism

“The person who abstains from food, or takes insufficient food, has neither enough strength to practice active virtues, nor can he till the earth, nor beget children, nor is he able to withstand hardship and pain.”

Vendidad Chapter 3 Verse 33

(from zoroastrian book)

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Want a pic ? It's on fb !!! im not just trying to elongate my essay ..... what i have posted is from what i have seen in pics. Since I live in India, I interact with Parsis / Zoroastrians in my day to day life so im pretty aware about their crazy rituals. Also, you asking me to look up their scriptures and holy books is kinda lame since that's not something which should be a recommendation on a Muslim / Shia forum.

Allah knows best.

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One of their rituals includes drinking the pee of the cow during marriage since the cow is sacred .... *yuck*

Please refrain from passing on such comments on the basis of what you saw on some page. My grandmother used to be a Parsi before marriage and it is hurtful to read such unauthentic comments.

Thankyou

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Zoroastrians believe that there is one universal and transcendent God, Ahura Mazda. He is said to be the one uncreated Creator to whom all worship is ultimately directed. Ahura Mazda's creation—evident as asha, truth and order—is the antithesis of chaos, which is evident asdruj, falsehood and disorder. The resulting conflict involves the entire universe, including humanity, which has an active role to play in the conflict.

The religion states that active participation in life through good thoughts, good words, and good deeds is necessary to ensure happiness and to keep chaos at bay. This active participation is a central element in Zoroaster's concept of free will, and Zoroastrianism rejects all forms ofmonasticism. Ahura Mazda will ultimately prevail over the evil Angra Mainyu or Ahriman, at which point the universe will undergo a cosmic renovation and time will end. In the final renovation, all of creation—even the souls of the dead that were initially banished to "darkness"—will be reunited in Ahura Mazda, returning to life in the undead form. At the end of time, a savior-figure (a Saoshyant) will bring about a final renovation of the world (frasho.kereti), in which the dead will be revived.

In Zoroastrian tradition, the malevolent is represented by Angra Mainyu (also referred to as "Ahriman"), the "Destructive Principle", while the benevolent is represented through Ahura Mazda's Spenta Mainyu, the instrument or "Bounteous Principle" of the act of creation. It is through Spenta Mainyu that transcendental Ahura Mazda is immanent in humankind, and through which the Creator interacts with the world. According to Zoroastrian cosmology, in articulating the Ahuna Vairya formula, Ahura Mazda made His ultimate triumph evident to Angra Mainyu. As expressions and aspects of Creation, Ahura Mazda emanated the Amesha Spentas ("Bounteous Immortals"), that are each thehypostasis and representative of one aspect of that Creation. These Amesha Spenta are in turn assisted by a league of lesser principles, theYazatas, each "Worthy of Worship" and each again a hypostasis of a moral or physical aspect of creation.

In Zoroastrianism, water and fire are agents of ritual purity, and the associated purification ceremonies are considered the basis of ritual life. In Zoroastrian cosmogony, water and fire are respectively the second and last primordial elements to have been created, and scripture considers fire to have its origin in the waters. Both water and fire are considered life-sustaining, and both water and fire are represented within the precinct of a fire temple. Zoroastrians usually pray in the presence of some form of fire (which can be considered evident in any source of light), and the culminating rite of the principle act of worship constitutes a "strengthening of the waters". Fire is considered a medium through which spiritual insight and wisdom is gained, and water is considered the source of that wisdom.

While the Parsees in India have traditionally been opposed to proselytizing, probably for historical reasons, and even considered it a crime for which the culprit may face expulsion,Iranian Zoroastrians have never been opposed to conversion, and the practice has been endorsed by the Council of Mobeds of Tehran. While the Iranian authorities do not permit proselytizing within Iran, Iranian Zoroastrians in exile have actively encouraged missionary activities, with The Zarathushtrian Assembly in Los Angeles and the International Zoroastrian Centre in Paris as two prominent centres.

As in many other faiths, Zoroastrians are strongly encouraged to marry others of the same faith, but this is not a requirement of the religion itself. Rather, it is a creation of those in India. Some members of the Indian Zoroastrian community (the Parsis) contend that a child must have a Parsi father to be eligible for introduction into the faith, but this assertion is considered by most to be a violation of the Zoroastrian tenets of gender equality, and may be a remnant of an old Indian legal definition (since overruled) of Parsi. This issue is a matter of debate within the Parsi community, but with the increasingly global nature of modern society and the dwindling number of Zoroastrians, such opinions are less vociferous than they were previously.

In Zoroastrian tradition, life is a temporary state in which a mortal is expected to actively participate in the continuing battle between truth and falsehood. Prior to being born, the soul (urvan) of an individual is still united with its fravashi, of which there are very many, and which have existed since Mazda created the universe. During life, the fravashi acts as a guardian and protector. On the fourth day after death, the soul is reunited with its fravashi, in which the experiences of life in the material world are collected for the continuing battle in the spiritual world. For the most part, Zoroastrianism does not have a notion of reincarnation, at least not until the final renovation of the world. Despite this, followers of Ilm-e-Kshnoom in India believe in reincarnation and practice vegetarianism, two principles unknown to Orthodox Zoroastrianism.[8]

In Zoroastrian scripture and tradition, a corpse is a host for decay, i.e., of druj. Consequently, scripture enjoins the "safe" disposal of the dead in a manner such that a corpse does not pollute the "good" creation. These injunctions are the doctrinal basis of the fast-fading traditional practice of "ritual exposure", most commonly identified with the so-called "Towers of Silence" for which there is no standard technical term in either scripture or tradition. The practice of ritual exposure is only practised by Zoroastrian communities of the Indian subcontinent, where it is not illegal, but where alternative disposal methods are desperately sought after diclofenac poisoning has led to the virtual extinction of scavenger birds. Other Zoroastrian communities either cremate their dead, or bury them in graves that are cased with lime mortar.

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Salaam,

 

Can someone please tell me in short summary, what Zoroastrianism is all about?  I have like always wondered about my Zoroastrian ancestors so its quite important to me!

Edited by Joon777

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Can anyone explain to me what Zoroastrianism is all about please?? I am really interested! My own ancestors were Zoroastrians, according to my family history like my own family is known to have been in Iran for like who knows since when, they have been there during the times of the Sassanian, Partihian, Achaemenid empires. They later became Muslim after the Arab invasions of Persia.

 

So I wanted to try reconnect with my heritage a little!

Edited by Joon777

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^Iran's historic heritage and history have been heavily influenced by Zoroastrianism, which is still a religion respected by many Iranians as it signifies our heritage and past identity. 

 

As a matter of fact we still use a calendar based on the historic Zoroastrian calendar, we still celebrate the Zoroastrian holidays like Nowrooz and Chaharshanbah Soori and I personally love the Zoroastrian symbol the Faravahar which has become an Iranian symbol which is ironically used heavily by non-Zoroastrian Iranians.  

 

We just can't remove Zoroastrian link as its been so influential to our identity. We are not just only Muslims, we have a 2500 year culture and civilisation.

 

We just happen to admire our past, unlike many other peoples as it is relevant to our identity and we are proud of it!

Edited by Joon777

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^Iran's historic heritage and history have been heavily influenced by Zoroastrianism, which is still a religion respected by many Iranians as it signifies our heritage and past identity. 

 

As a matter of fact we still use a calendar based on the historic Zoroastrian calendar, we still celebrate the Zoroastrian holidays like Nowrooz and Chaharshanbah Soori and I personally love the Zoroastrian symbol the Faravahar which has become an Iranian symbol which is ironically used heavily by non-Zoroastrian Iranians.  

 

We just can't remove Zoroastrian link as its been so influential to our identity. We are not just only Muslims, we have a 2500 year culture and civilisation.

 

We just happen to admire our past, unlike many other peoples as it is relevant to our identity and we are proud of it!

The problem with Zoroastrianism is that there are no primary sources on the religious practices of pre-islamic Iran, except for fragments of the Avesta, mainly concerning liturgy or rituals. You'll have to rely on the sources used by the current zoroastrian community which were written down long after Iran had become majority muslim & they are therefore likely to contain influences from islam. Zoroastrianism was a diverse faith that was widely practiced throughout the whole of the 'east' (from a european perspective) once ruled by Iran. Manichaeanism is another indigenous iranian religion that is likely to contains a lot of zoroastrian influences.

 

Here's a symposium with lectures on Zoroastrianism given by secular western scholars in english: 

Here's a discussion between with an iranian expats & scholar who himself is zoroastrian about the philosophy of Zoroaster, although this is very likely to be 'reconstruction' of what this scholar himself believes might have been the philosophy rather than the actual philosophy of Zoroaster: 

 

The 'priests' of the religion of Zoroaster were called Magi's & they are said to have been experts in the arts of Magic & Astrology along with the particular laws & rituals of zoroastrian religious practice. The association of zoroastrian priests to magic dates back to Greece & Rome, where magic was not seen as evil as long as it was not done to hurt others. Therefore I believe it to be credible that they were well versed in magical arts. This expertise of the Magi is mentioned many treatises of greco-roman philosophers, particularly Iamblichus (called "the divine") of Chalcis, Syria, mentions that his own expertise in Magical Rites Magi's who in turn have gotten the knowledge from Zoroaster. The kind of zoroastrianism talked about by the romans was more a polytheistic faith.It contained many lesser gods or divinities beneath the supreme God, Mithra being one of them. Zoroastrianism was practiced up in Uzbekistan, Northern Iraq & even parts of China at times.

Edited by Shamati

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On 30/06/2011 at 7:30 AM, xstatik2 said:

One of their rituals includes drinking the pee of the cow during marriage since the cow is sacred .... *yuck*

I think you mean when they have the navjote ceremony, when the child becomes iniated into the faith-similar  concept as confirmation in catholicism for example. I think a similar practice existed in hinduism in the Rig Veda. Some people argue that zoroastrianism was an offshoot of rig vedic practices, although at the time there wasn't a name for hinduism rather many different practices existing at that early time perhaps they also combined this practices later.

 zoroastrians profess a belief in one God, day of judgement, angels, heaven, and hell. It is possible that they incorporated these beliefs later, including they moved away to a dualistic concept, incorporating different beliefs that existed throughout the empire and amongst others.

Edited by Parastoo27

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1 hour ago, Parastoo27 said:

I think you mean when they have the navjote ceremony, when the child becomes iniated into the faith-similar  concept as confirmation in catholicism for example. I think a similar practice existed in hinduism in the Rig Veda. Some people argue that zoroastrianism was an offshoot of rig vedic practices, although at the time there wasn't a name for hinduism rather many different practices existing at that early time perhaps they also combined this practices later.

 zoroastrians profess a belief in one God, day of judgement, angels, heaven, and hell. It is possible that they incorporated these beliefs later, including they moved away to a dualistic concept, incorporating different beliefs that existed throughout the empire and amongst others.

So its true that they drink pee in some rituals ?

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4 hours ago, Fatima Hussain said:

Source PLEASE.

Quote

The nahan (or nahn) is a ritual bath taken before a ceremony such as the Navjote or Sudreh-Pooshi initiation ceremony or a wedding ceremony. The mother also takes a nahan after childbrith. 

In preparation for the bath, the person under the guidance of the officiating priest, recites a prayer (the baj) and then chews on a pomegranate leaf that the priest will have brought with him. After removing the chewed leaf, the person also either sips or places her or his lips to a small metal container containing nirang (consecrated white bull's urine called taro or gomez when not consecrated). The taro is ritually consecrated to nirang in advance and is believed to have cleansing properties (also see Darmesteter 5.5).

http://heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/purification/index.htm

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13 hours ago, Parastoo27 said:

Yes it is true, my poor mum had to do it when she was 8 :( she still remembers how gross it was

Are there some other strange zoroastrian narrations like that ?

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