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Aafreen

Sabz Chai

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The most delicious cup of tea I've had was several years ago at an Afghani family's house. It was green tea but with milk i.e. similar to the Pakistani chai, with dry fruit sprinkled on it. I've longed for a similar cup of tea ever since and I think my patience is now running out. So I would really appreciate it if someone knows the 'recipe' and can share it!

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The most delicious cup of tea I've had was several years ago at an Afghani family's house. It was green tea but with milk i.e. similar to the Pakistani chai, with dry fruit sprinkled on it. I've longed for a similar cup of tea ever since and I think my patience is now running out. So I would really appreciate it if someone knows the 'recipe' and can share it!

:blink:

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Ingredients:

Milk-1/2 kg

Tea leaves-6 tablespoons

Water-1/4 liter

green Cardamoms-6

Almonds-10

Pistachio-6

Sugar-according to taste

Method:

  1. Warm water and add the tea leaves, boil it for for some time
  2. White it is boiling, mix it well by taking another container and pouring the liquid between the two
  3. After about 20 minutes of doing this add milk, cardamoms and sugar
  4. Let it cook for another 10 minutes and then take it off and pour in cups
  5. Now crush the remaining almonds and pistachio and sprinkle on top of the tea

Ref:Sabz chai recipe

Alternatively you can also try these versions:

Alternate recipe1

Alternate recipe2

Well not sure if this is what you wanted, anyways hope it helps

Edited by farwa

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I know what you're thinking, milk and green tea usually don't go together. But like said, this was one time they did - and I still remember it 5 years later!

Yeah, thats what I was wondering. I know pink [kashmiri] chai is prepared with milk but didn't know that you can put milk in qehwa? There is a confusion. See farwa's alternate recipe 1 post #7. People are equating sabz chai [qehwa] with kashmiri chai [gulabi in colour not sabz].

Are you asking for the pinkish kashmiri chai sprinkled with almonds and cashews or green coloured qehwa [sabz chai]? Farwa's recipe is for the Kashmiri tea I think.

Compare kashmiri chai with sabz chai. The former is always with milk. I have never seen milk in the latter type.

post-23617-12645063960547_thumb.jpg post-23617-12645064073976_thumb.jpg

post-23617-12645064580559_thumb.jpgpost-23617-12645064968975_thumb.jpg

Edited by Marbles

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Right, I spoke to my mom about the sabz chai and Kashmiri chai. She said that pink coloured milky 'Kashmiri chai' [as it is popularly called here] - just as in the cup above - actually IS sabz chai. It's called so because the tea leaves are green. The other sabz chai which is greenish in colour and without milk is popularly called qehwa. They are made from different leaves and taste totally different.

Aafreen, you could get the milky sabz chai you were looking for everywhere if you lived in Pakistan. We make it at home and enjoy a daily cup in the evening. It's truly delicious. You can put both salt and sugar in it to taste.

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Thank you so much farwa, I shall try making it in the next few days.

@ Marbles: I assumed it was an Afghani recipe so it couldn't be Kashmiri chai... The Kashmiri chai I have had tastes good. But not as good as the cup of tea at that Afghani home. That was one heavenly cup whose memories linger on...

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Thank you so much farwa, I shall try making it in the next few days.

@ Marbles: I assumed it was an Afghani recipe so it couldn't be Kashmiri chai... The Kashmiri chai I have had tastes good. But not as good as the cup of tea at that Afghani home. That was one heavenly cup whose memories linger on...

Hmmm I see.

Perhaps the chai you had was made from different leaves? Maybe its recipe was a tad different? What colour was it? Anything like Kashmiri?

I'm thinking of the tea - Kashmiri style but not exactly the same - that I had in a number of Afghani restaurants in Quetta. Ok, I will ask an elder LOL.

Good luck with the recipe. Please do come back and tell us if you make it.

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(salam)

The recipe calls for cardamons in the tea. :unsure: Wouldn't this make your tea really hot (not in temperature but spiciness)?

Also, is there any difference between Kashmiri and Indian Masala Tea? :unsure:

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(salam)

The recipe calls for cardamons in the tea. :unsure: Wouldn't this make your tea really hot (not in temperature but spiciness)?

It does become 'hot' but I guess some people like it. I prefer it without.

Also, is there any difference between Kashmiri and Indian Masala Tea? :unsure:

Indian masala tea? Never heard of that?

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(salam)

The recipe calls for cardamons in the tea. :unsure: Wouldn't this make your tea really hot (not in temperature but spiciness)?

Also, is there any difference between Kashmiri and Indian Masala Tea? :unsure:

(wasalam)

I am not sure what you mean by spiciness here, it adds more of a flavored aroma rather than a spicy effect. But if you don't like the taste you can skip it completely.

Kashmiri tea is brewed with special tea leaves, that are known by the name(at least in Pakistan its like this not sure about other countries).

Masala chai simply means infusing the flavor of different spices like cardamoms, nutmeg, cloves etc. so you can do it with black tea leaves or the kashmiri ones...really just depends on your preference.

Edited by farwa

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Ingredients:

Milk-1/2 kg

Tea leaves-6 tablespoons

Water-1/4 liter

green Cardamoms-6

Almonds-10

Pistachio-6

Sugar-according to taste

Method:

  1. Warm water and add the tea leaves, boil it for for some time
  2. White it is boiling, mix it well by taking another container and pouring the liquid between the two
  3. After about 20 minutes of doing this add milk, cardamoms and sugar
  4. Let it cook for another 10 minutes and then take it off and pour in cups
  5. Now crush the remaining almonds and pistachio and sprinkle on top of the tea

Ref:Sabz chai recipe

Alternatively you can also try these versions:

Alternate recipe1

Alternate recipe2

Well not sure if this is what you wanted, anyways hope it helps

nice recipe

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What sabz chai and kashmiri chai are you guys talkin about? :dry: Isn't the recipe given above incomplete? We, in Kashmir, use baking soda in green tea. Otherwise, I dont understand how the chai is going to be of pink colour!!!! ^_^ Further, i have never heard of any Kashmiri putting sugar in "sabz chai" or nun chai, (as we call it). It is always salty (and refreshing). Yeah but in the month of muharam, when i went to Lucknow, they were serving Kashmiri chai. I was overjoyed to see that familiar pink color. I went crazy (coz i had not had nun chai since 2 months) and asked for a cup of nun chai. i was so eager to drink it but when I took a sip,I spat it all out. You know why? Coz they had put sugar in it!!! :unsure: So, I think nun chai always tastes best wd nooon (salt). :!!!:

P.S: Dont forget the baking soda. :blush:

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Nooooo!!!! Dont try it. It s not like salt in normal tea. Uh-huh, not at all. It is somewhat different. Rather, altogether different.

For making four cups of nooon chai:-

1. Take 2 cups of water in a utensil.

2. Put 2 tablespoons of green tea and 2 pinches of baking soda.

3. Bring to boil. wait till most of the water evaporates.

4. When only a little amount of water remains behind, add 21/2 cups of water and 11/2 cups of milk.

5. Add salt to taste.

6. Bring to boil and and pour yourself a cup and enjoy!!!!!!!! :!!!:

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