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What is the meaning of Assalam-o-Alaikum

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Hi

Will anybody tell me the meaning of Assalam-o-Alaikum.

John Adam

May Allah (God) Bless you

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May Allah (God) Bless you

???? Asalamu alaykum means peace be with you all. I thought all muslims use this type of greeting?

May Allah (God) Bless you

???? Asalamu alaykum means peace be with you all. I thought all muslims use this type of greeting?

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Well Guys

Suddenly i reached on this forum and find it interesting. I am Nicholas Mathew from NY and this is first time i am joining some Muslim community. This is very interesting. I also want to share comments about Assalam-o-Alaykum.

As-Salāmu `Alaykum (ÇáÓáÇã Úáíßã) is an Arabic spoken greeting used by Muslims as well as non-Muslim Arabic speakers, Christians and Jews. The term Salam in Arabic means "Peace". The greeting may also be transliterated as Assalaamu 'Aleykum. It means "Peace be upon you". The traditional response is wa `Aleykum As-Salaam, meaning "and upon you be peace."

This type of greeting is common in the Middle East and Africa; its Hebrew counterpart greeting is Shalom aleichem and in Maltese is Sliem ghalikom.

The greeting is almost always accompanied by a handshake. The exception is during the Islamic holiday Eid, when the hand shake is customarily preceded by three embraces. This practice however is not based on any Islamic ruling.

In Arabia the greeting is associated with two or three light kisses. On the Indian subcontinent, the saying of Salaam is often accompanied with an obeisance, performed by bowing low and raising the right hand till it is in front of the forehead. In Indonesia, greeting is usually accompanied by a kind of two-handed "handshake". None of these is derived from Islamic custom, but are based in cultural traditions.

taken from Wiki

Mathew

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Since this discussion is about assalam alaikum as well as alaihis salam I thought this would be interesting.

The following is from a commentary of Ziyarat e Ashura in translation process by Shaykh Saleem Bhimji:

The commentary is over the part that says

"Peace be upon you Ya Aba Abdillah, Peace be upon you O son of the Messenger of Allah, Peace be upon you O son of the Commander of the Faithful and the son of the leader of the inheritors (of the Prophet); Peace be upon you O son of Fatimah, the leader of the women of the entire Universe."

The true meaning of "As-Salam Alaikum" is not a mere "Hi", "Hello", "How are you" as we are accustomed to using today - it has a much deeper meaning than just a standard greeting. In actuality, there are three meanings for this greeting:

1. As-Salam, as we know, is one of the names of Allah. Thus, when we say "As-Salam Alaikum" we are actually saying that may the trait of Allah (as-Salam or peace and tranquility_ be upon you and may He protect you;

2. As-Salam is also in the meaning of submission or surrender. Thus, when we say "As-Salam Alaikum" we are actually saying that we submit to what you would like for us to do (obviously within the limits of the Shariah);

3. As-Salam is also in the meaning of protection or safety. Thus in this meaning, when we greet another believer with "As-Salam Alaikum" we are actually guaanteeing our believing brother or sister protection from any evil from ourselves and that we will not do a single thing to harm them - either physically or even spiritually. Not only would we not harm them with our hands, but we will also not cause them grief with our tongue...

Thus when we address Abi Abdillah and say "As-Salamu Alaika Yaa Aba Abdillah" we are saying that: 'May the peace and tranquility which Allah bestows upon His creations also be showered upon you. Truly, we submit to your mission and commandments and whatever you ask us to do. In addition, we shall not do a single thing to hurt you - either your physical presence or more importantly, your feelings.'

In actuality, we are promising the Imam (as) that we shall not break the laws of Allah (since our Imam grieves when he sees us doing this) nor will we do anything to trample on the sacred goals and objectives which he laid down his life to protect.

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Welcome Nicholas and Adam, Salam

I hope you'll do some reading around here and if you have any questions just raise them, we can help you find your way and vice versa!

Stick around and have fun guys.

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