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Zaidi Shia


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#1 MFT

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 12:00 PM

Asalaamu alaikum bros and sis'.

I am interested in knowing more about what the Zaidis believe. I have done internet searches and have found very limited information.

This is all i can find so far:

Zaidi beliefs are moderate compared to other Shia sects. The Zaidis do not believe in the infallibility of the Imams, nor that they receive divine guidance. Zaidis also do not believe that the Imamate must pass from father to son, but believe it can be held by any descendant of Ali. They also reject the Twelver notion of a hidden Imam, and like the Ismailis believe in a living imam, or even imams.

In matters of law or fiqh, the Zaidis are actually closest to the Sunni Shafie school.

In matters of theology, the Zaidis are close to the Mu'tazili school, but they are not Mu'tazili...


Can someone clarify Zaidi beliefs or expound on them, please?

Maybe even if you suggested a link or a book I can read.

Thanks!

ws

#2 Link

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 12:50 PM

(wasalam)

www.altafsir.com you can read their tafsir there.

They believe Caliphate belongs to the family of Mohammad (pbuh). They have much hadiths to support that.

They also show Auli-Mohammad (pbuh) are chosen, and have hadiths about their Spiritual Wilayah as well. However, Zaidis today I think don't focus on that (and are in fact ignorant of that) but just the politics part, so this is perhaps why sunnis see them very much like themselves and not "extreme" like us.

They weren't vocal against Abu Baker and Umar and Uthman but focused on current rulers, however, I don't think they were ok with Abu Baker and Umar, and I don't see any evidence of that but i see the opposite implied because of the hadiths they narrate show it was usurped from Ahle-Bayt (as) and they do say it belongs to Ahle-Bayt (as) via proof from Quran + traditions.

Edited by Link, 10 February 2008 - 12:56 PM.


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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:01 PM

Zaydis (also: Zaidi, Zaiddiyah, or in the West Fivers) are the most moderate of the Shi'a groups and the nearest to the Sunnis in their theology. They say that they are a "fifth school" of Islam (in addition to the four Sunni orthodox schools). This Shi`ite sect is named after Zayd b. Ali, grandson of Husayn. The Zaydi sect was formed by the followers of Zayd b. Ali, who led an unsuccessful rebellion against the Umayyad caliph Hisham in 740.

According to Zaydi political theory, Ali, Hasan and Husayn are the first three rightful Imams; after them, the imamate is open to whomever of their descendants establishes himself through armed rebellion. Shia regard Imam Ali Zayn al-Abidin as the fourth imam. While most shias take Muhammed Al-Baqir to be the next Imam, Zayadis take Al-Baqir's brother Zayd as imam.

Zaidi see Zayd as the fifth Imam because of the rebellion he led against the Umayyad dynasty, which he believed was corrupt. Muhammad al-Baqir did not engage in political action, whereas Zayd preached that a true Imam must fight against corrupt rulers.

Not all Zaidis believe that Zaid is the true Imam. Zaidis known as Wastis believes in Twelver Imams. They are part of Shia Ithna Ashiri. Most of them settled in India, Pakistan. The biggest group of Zaidis having their belive on Twelve Shia Imams is known as Saadat-e-Bahra.

#4 Link

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:18 PM

Zaidis in my opinion originally didn't reject the 12 Imams (as) but were politically showing the Islamic teachings regarding politics and that the government needed to be overthrown.

Reading the tafsir, I believe the distinguished between Spiritual Imamate and Worldly Caliphate. See the rejectors of Zaid (ra) were termed Rafidis and I believe Zaidism was originally a movement started by one of the companions of the Imam (as) (i don't believe he renegaded) to make people understand the issue of governance and need to obey anyone who rises for justice and is knowledgeable and of good qualities.

During Imam Musa al-Kathim (as) , a person from the line of Hassan (as) came up to him and asked him permission to rise, and he did, and it was major event in history, and also we have hadiths of Imams (as) condemning those who listened to call of Zaid (ra) but didn't respond.

This shows the righteous scholars calling to justice should have been followed... not just Imams (as), in fact Imams (as) did delegate this permission of leadership to other members of bani-hashim. But the issue is they had to be shown trustworthy and people who return the trust to their owners (ie. had loyalty to the chosen Imams (as))

I believe the original Zaidi movement was this, but it was later misunderstood...



I also believe the rejectors of Zaid (ra) were the worse people on earth and the people who continued to have that view are the worse people.

#5 Aonmuhammed

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:29 PM

(salam)


Ok I need to clarify there is 1 sect of Zaidis the majority of which are in Yemen and they are followers of the son of Zainul Abideen, Zaid Shaheed , similar to Nurari but the other side of it are the Syed Zaidis they are the descendants of Zaid Shaheed and they are Shia ithnasheri and believe in 12 imams etc. After the martyrdom of Zaid Shaheed the younger son of imam Zainul Abideen(a.s) this sect developed in support of his cause and his cause was to avenge the incidents of Kerbala and these are extremist followers of Zaid but in support of his cause. Zaid Shaheed did know that IMAM MUHAMMAD BAQIR (a.s) will become the imam after his father as this is decided for each imam before their birth the minority in that time believed that Zaid Shaheed was their leader as Nusaris do with Imam Ali (a.s) but we know this is wrong.


The prophet said that one of my sons will be martyred in 3 ways and he used to cry when relaying this.

Zaid Shaheed bin ALi was martyred by the enemy of the time by firstly being hanged then he was beheaded and his head was hung on the gates of the city and his body was burnt for punishment.


Please do not confuse Syed Zaidi with Zaidia Firqa (sect)

(wasalam)

#6 Musafir-E-Shaam

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:53 PM

im a syed zaidi

and those next zaidis who believe in sum imams are only from yemen

#7 MFT

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 05:36 PM

Asalaamu alaikum every1.

Thanks for the replies. This helps some.

I looked at this website suggested (www.altafsir.com) and although they say they have zaidi tafsir, I can't find any under their tafsir listings. Thanks anyhow.

I am really interested in the Zaidi. Aren't they the descendents of those in Yemen directly converted by Ali (ra)? Yemen is the only region that I know of that still speaks quranic arabic as a common language.

shukrun

#8 lfatima

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:04 PM


Not all Zaidis believe that Zaid is the true Imam. Zaidis known as Wastis believes in Twelver Imams. They are part of Shia Ithna Ashiri. Most of them settled in India, Pakistan. The biggest group of Zaidis having their belive on Twelve Shia Imams is known as Saadat-e-Bahra.

(salam)
I cannot even imagine it being otherwise.
The Zaidies of Yemen are different.

Peace!

#9 MohammadMufti

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:23 PM

Not all Zaidis believe that Zaid is the true Imam. Zaidis known as Wastis believes in Twelver Imams. They are part of Shia Ithna Ashiri. Most of them settled in India, Pakistan. The biggest group of Zaidis having their belive on Twelve Shia Imams is known as Saadat-e-Bahra.


This is talking about Zaydi family, not Zaydi madhab. Zaydi madhab doesn't recognize the 11 Imams, people descended from al Imam Zayd ibn Ali ÑÖí Çááøå ÚÜäÜå are called Zaydi (as their sur-name) and can be of any religion (just like someone called as Kazmi, Fatimi or the like). And modern day Shi'at e Zayd have their website:

http://www.izbacf.org/

#10 Eurybia

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 02:56 AM

Thanks for all the info, I never knew that Zaidi Shias had distinctions. I thought all Ziadi's are the same probabaly due to the fact that i live in Pakistan. A freind of mine mentioned something about Sadaat-e-bahra a few yrs back, but i never had an idea wat it really was, I thought it was some geographical region.

#11 koroigetsuga

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 03:10 AM

hmmmmmm.....

are there any zaidis on this site who can verify any of this...when learning about a particular creed its always best to learn from those who adhere to it

#12 Aonmuhammed

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 04:04 AM

(salam)


ye Syedzaidi Shia

#13 MFT

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 12:02 PM

hmmmmmm.....

are there any zaidis on this site who can verify any of this...when learning about a particular creed its always best to learn from those who adhere to it


Yeah, I agree. I always like to go to the source. Seems so many of us get caught up in this and that while the truth remains elusive. Thats why i came on this site, because some Sunni folks (I am sunni by default since when I converted to Islam it was at a sunni masjid) were prejudging and misrepresenting some facts that I knew to be true from Zaidis I have known in the past.

Seems a lot of ignorance abounds. I didn't chose Islam out of a desire to remain ignorant and believe what I wanted to. It took a lot of education and overcoming my own prejudices and misunderstandings. There is no blind faith or following in Islam.

People can sincerely be wrong in the eyes of Allah (even though theologically and ritualistically correct and devout) and end up in the hellfire because of their lack of mercy, understanding and willingness to overcome their prejudices against their brothers and sisters in Islam.

#14 macisaac

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 12:52 PM

I have some of their literature (hadith works, fiqh, kalam, history).

Referring to them as "fivers" isn't accurate, though you'll commonly read that. Neither is it accurate to say that they are Hanafi in their fiqh. However, in terms of kalam, they are pretty close to the Mu`tazila (with some differences though, particularly on Imama).

They believe that Imam `Ali (as) was the successor of the Prophet (pbuh) and most superior after him, however they do not believe that he was explicitly designated as such, that is, they deny the nass as we Imamiyya hold. In doing so, they seek to justify the rule of Abu Bakr and `Umar as the rule of the less superior over the superior. After Imam `Ali (as), they believe that Imam Hasan (as) and Imam Husayn (as) were the next Imams. After that however, they believe that any descendant of either two Imams (as) can rise up to be the Imam. They do not believe that Imam must be designated, do not believe that he is Ma`sum, do not believe that he has a special knowledge beyond that of a religious scholar. To them the Imam is more or less a dynastic politico/religious position. They do not believe that Imam `Ali b. al-Husayn (as) was an Imam, instead they believe the next one was Zayd b. `Ali ash-Shahid (ra) (they do not believe he was designated, but that he rose up to the position). Then, they move onto his son Yahya, and so on. The longest running dynasty of Zaydi Imams was the Hadawiyya in Yemen, who ruled the area for around a thousand years until their last Imam was killed in the 1960s. Currently, they do not have an Imam. There had also been for a time a Zaydi dynasty in Tabaristan, and then Gilan, with another line of Imams.

The problem with narrowing down precisely what Zaydism is that over the centuries it has morphed and changed itself several times. For instance, the early Jarudiyya Zaydis apparently believed that there would be twelve Imams and understood the position of an Imam to be something closer to what we Imamis believe. Eventually, they largely went over to the Imamiyya and left Zaydism. In fiqh, they apparently do not even use the earlier Zaydi collection of hadiths, the so-called Musnad Zayd, but instead follow the fiqh of their Imam al-Hadi ila al-Haqq Yahya b. al-Husayn, the founder of the Zaydi dynasty in Sana`a, Yemen (I have their main book of fiqh which I think he wrote, with a commentary by Shawkani on it at home, don't remember the title off hand) Nowadays, from what I've heard the situation is even more confused. They have no Imam they recognize, with some Zaydis converting to Wahhabism and others forming around groups (one even I heard having a connection with the Moonies...). Al-hamdu lillah, some have been coming over to Twelver Shi`ism now also.

#15 MFT

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 02:13 PM

Interesting Macisaac.

Can you suggest any books or reading that I might do on the topic?

Also, what is the Mu`tazila school of thought? It there a brief synopsis I can read about it?

Pardon me for my ignorance. I am only familiar with the 4 sunni schools. :blush:

#16 koroigetsuga

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 02:21 PM

Also, what is the Mu`tazila school of thought? It there a brief synopsis I can read about it?


http://www.muslimphi...ip/rep/H052.htm

#17 Muslim_sunni

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 07:54 PM

I am from Yemen but I am not Zaidi, I have never heard of something like a Zaidi mosque or Zaidi region. There are a lot of Zaidis in Yemen but they are nothing like the Shia in general. They do not curse Omer RA, Abo Baker RA, Othman RA or Aysha RA. I am not familiar with their believes and how close or different from the shia but I have never noticed any different between sunnies and Zaidis. Did not really have a fried who identify himself as a Zaidi or Sunni.

#18 Thurston

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 08:03 PM

Sayed Ammar had a lecture on this topic a few weeks ago -

http://www.hyderi.or...9-Muharram-1429

(24th Muharram - 1429)

#19 MohammadMufti

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 09:21 PM

Can you suggest any books or reading that I might do on the topic?


Their ahadith books and other books are available through the website I mentioned (in Arabic). To summarize, they are closer to Ahlus Sunnah wa'l Jammah than Ithna Ashariyyah, and are like other early Tafzilli Shi'a sects (who used to say Ali was superior to sheikhan but didn't reject/curse the first 2, similar to the break-away from early Shi'ism - The Ibadiyyah madhab in Oman).

#20 macisaac

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 09:56 PM

Interesting Macisaac.

Can you suggest any books or reading that I might do on the topic?

Also, what is the Mu`tazila school of thought? It there a brief synopsis I can read about it?

Pardon me for my ignorance. I am only familiar with the 4 sunni schools. :blush:



I'm not aware of any books in English that are specifically about the Zaydiyya. The material I have is in Arabic that I was able to find in Qum (and even there, there isn't much to be found in terms edited/published material unless you're in Yemen, I'd suppose). Now, if you can read Arabic, Shaykh Ja`far Subhani has a series of works on different madhahib which are pretty in depth, with discussion on the Zaydiyya in the seventh volume of said work:

http://rafed.net/boo...al-7/index.html

As to the Mu`tazila, they are a largely extinct school of kalam (theology) that at one point were the "officially" promoted school of theology amongst the non-Shia (saying "Sunni" at this point isn't all that accurate as Sunnism didn't yet exist then in its current forms), and which received patronage by a number of the `Abbasid rulers. Shahid Mutahhari goes over some of their beliefs (as well as those of the Asharites (dominant school of Sunni kalam) and of the Imami (Twelver) Shi`as) in this article:

http://www.muslimphi...om/ip/kalam.htm

Give it a read. The Zaydis largely adopted the Mu`tazila positions in kalam, though in addition to their specific beliefs in Imama as they define it.

Anyhow akh, I think it's a good thing to want to be expanding your knowledge beyond the information you've been presented with so far in your contacts with Sunnis such as by learning of the different sects and schools that exist (or have existed). I hope though, in sha Allah, you'll also go further in studying the beliefs of the Imamiyya, that is, of Twelver Shi`ism. As someone who has himself studied a number of these sects (and being a convert myself) I can say the answers are in the path of the Ahl al-Bayt of our beloved Prophet (pbuh), that of the Twelve Ma`sum Imams from `Ali b. Abi Talib (as) to our living Imam of today, al-Mahdi al-Muntazar (as), may Allah hasten his reappearance.

#21 Eurybia

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 10:03 PM

I don't know whether this it related or not, but I would wanna know a bit about Abidi's too.
like there are both Zaidi's & Abidi's in our surroundings, right so are Abidi's descendents of the Fourth Imam Zain-ul-Abideen (as)?
and can some one tell wat was the cause of this which gave birth to Zaidi's & Abidi's ? it'll be really nice if someone would help.

#22 macisaac

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 07:12 AM

The longest running dynasty of Zaydi Imams was the Hadawiyya in Yemen, who ruled the area for around a thousand years until their last Imam was killed in the 1960s.


Correcting myself here, their last "Imam", Muhammad al-Badr, was not killed in the 60s. Actually, he died in exile in the UK in 1996.

http://findarticles....14/ai_n14061849

#23 Al-Zaidi

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 04:02 PM

This should clarify all of your misconceptions

Zaidiyya, Zaidism or Zaydism (Arabic: الزيدية az-zaydiyya, adjective form Zaidi or Zaydi) is a Shī'a madhhab (sect, school) named after the Imām Zayd ibn ˤAlī. Followers of the Zaidi fiqh are called Zaidis (or occasionally, Fivers by Sunnis).

There is also a group called the Zaidi Wasītīs who are Twelvers (see below).

Zaidi is also a family name, used by claimed descendants of Zayd ibn Ali and, as such, there are Sunni Zaidi, too, mainly in Pakistan and India. Especially in English, the distinction between the sect and and the family name is made in spelling; the sect is referred to as "Zaydi", while the family name is usually "Zaidi".
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Zaidi Imāms
* 2 Law
* 3 Theology
* 4 Unique Beliefs
* 5 Community and former States
* 6 See also
o 6.1 Al-Zaidi
o 6.2 Zaidi Wasitis
o 6.3 Literature
* 7 References
* 8 External links

[edit] Zaidi Imāms

Followers of the Zaidi fiqh recognize the first four of the Twelve Imams but they accept Zayd ibn Ali as their "Fifth Imām", instead of his brother Muhammad al-Baqir. After Zayd ibn Ali, the Zaidi recognize other descendants of Hasan ibn Ali or Husayn ibn Ali to be Imams. Other well known Zaidi imams in history were Yahya ibn Zayd, Muhammad al Nafs az-Zakiyah and Ibrahim ibn Abdullah.
Muhammad Prophet of Islam
Ali ibn Abu Talib 1st Imam
Hasan ibn Ali 2nd Imam
Husayn ibn Ali 3rd Imam
Ali ibn Husayn (Zayn al Abidin) 4th Imam
Zayd ibn Ali 5th Imam
[edit] Law

In matters of law or fiqh, the Zaidis follow Zaid ibn Ali's teachings which are documented in his book Majmu Al Fiqh (in Arabic: مجموع الفِقه). The Zaidis are similar to the Hanafi madhhab with elements of the Jafaari madhhab.
[edit] Theology

In matters of theology, the Zaidis are close to the Mu'tazili school, but they are not Mu'tazilite, since there are a few issues between both schools, most notably the Zaidi doctrine of the imamate imamah, that are rejected by Mu'tazilites.
[edit] Unique Beliefs

The Zaidi Sects [1]

* The Zaidi sect was started by the followers of Zaid bin 'Ali, his companions Abu'l Jarud Ziyad ibn Abi Ziyad, Sulayman ibn Jarir, Kathir an-Nawa Al-Abtar and Hasan ibn Salih.
* The Zaidi sect then divided into three groups:

1. The earliest group called, Jarudiyya (named for Abu'l Jarud Ziyad ibn Abi Ziyad), was opposed to the approval of certain companions of Muhammad. They held that there was sufficient description given by the Prophet so that all should have recognised Imam 'Ali. They therefore consider the companions sinful in failing to recognise Imam 'Ali as the legitimate Caliph. They also deny legitimacy to Abu Bakr, 'Umar and 'Uthman, they also denounce Talha, Zubair. This sect was active during the late Umayyad and early 'Abbasid period. Its views although predominant among the later Zaidis, became extinct in Iraq and Iran due to forced conversion to Ithna' Ashariyya by the Safawids.
2. The second group, Sulaimaniyya (for Sulayman ibn Jarir), held that the Imamate should be a matter to be decided by consultation. They felt that the companions, including Abu Bakr and 'Umar, had been in error in failing to follow Imam 'Ali but it did not amount to sin.
3. The third group is Tabiriyya, Butriyya or Salihiyya (for Kathir an-Nawa Al-Abtar and Hasan ibn Salih). They are virtually identical in belief with the Sulaimaniyya, however they include Uthman into the non-sin category of error.

The Zaidis do not believe in the infallibility of the Imams, nor that the Imams receive divine guidance. Zaidis also do not believe that the Imamate must pass from father to son, but believe it can be held by any Sayyid descended from either Hasan ibn Ali or Husayn ibn Ali. It must be noted, however, that Shi'i Twelvers do not necessarily believe in Imamate passing from father to son either, as can be seen from the transition of Imamate from the second Imam, Hasan ibn Ali, after his death to his brother Husayn ibn Ali.

Zaidis believe Zayd was the rightful successor to the Imāmate because he led a rebellion against the Umayyads, whom he believed were tyrannical and corrupt. Muhammad al-Baqir did not engage in political action and the followers of Zayd believed that a true Imām must fight against corrupt rulers.[citation needed]

Zaidis also reject the notion of Occultation (ghayba) of the "Hidden Imām". Like the Ismā'īlīs, they believe in a living Imām (or Imāms).[citation needed] Great Sunni Imam Abu Hanifa has given a Fatwa (Legal verdict) in favor of Imam Zaid[citation needed] in his rebellion against Ummayid ruler of his time.
[edit] Community and former States

Since the earliest form of Zaidism was of the Jarudiyya group[1], many of the first Zaidi states, like those of the Alavids, Buyids, Ukhaidhirids[citation needed] and Rassids, were inclined to the Jarudiyya group.

The Idrisids (Arabic: الأدارسة‎) were Arab [2] Zaydi Shia[3][4][5][6][7][8] dynasty in the western Maghreb ruling from 788 to 985, named after its first sultan, Idriss I.

A Zaidi state was established in Daylaman and Tabaristan (northern Iran) in 864 C.E. by the Alavids[9]; it lasted until the death of its leader at the hand of the Samanids in 928 C.E. Roughly forty years later the state was revived in Gilan (north-western Iran) and survived under Hasanid leaders until 1126 C.E. After which from the 12th-13th centuries, the Zaidis of Daylaman, Gilan and Tabaristan then acknowledge the Zaidi Imams of Yemen or rival Zaidi Imams within Iran.[10]

The Buyids were initially Zaidi[11] as well as the Ukhaidhirite rulers of al-Yamama in the 9th and 10th centuries.[12]

The leader of the Zaidi community took the title of Caliph. As such, the ruler of Yemen was known as the Caliph, al-Hadi Yahya bin al-Hussain bin al-Qasim ar-Rassi Rassids (a descendant of Imam al-Hasan) who, at Sa'da, in c. 893-7 C.E., founded the Zaidi Imamate and this system continued until the middle of the 20th century, until the revolution of 1962 C.E. that deposed the Zaidi Imam (see Imams of Yemen). The founding Zaidism of Yemen was of the Jarudiyya group[13], however with the increasing interaction with Hanafi and Shafi'i Sunni Islam, there was a shift from the Jarudiyya group to the Sulaimaniyya, Tabiriyya, Butriyya or Salihiyya groups.

Currently, Zaidis constitute about 40-45% of the population in Yemen. Ja'faris and Isma'ilis are 2-5%.[2],[3] In Saudi Arabia, it is estimated that there are over 1 million Zaidis (primarily in the western provinces).[citation needed]

Currently the most prominent Zaidi movement is Hussein al-Houthi's Shabab Al Mu'mineen who have been engaged in a uprising against the Yemeni Government in which the Army has lost 743 men and thousands of innocent civilians have been killed or displaced by Houthi and government forces causing a grave humanitarian crisis in north Yemen. Shia Population of the Middle East[14]
[edit] See also
[edit] Al-Zaidi
Main article: Al-Zaidi (surname)
[edit] Zaidi Wasitis
Main article: Zaidi (surname)
[edit] Literature

* Cornelis van Arendonk : Les débuts de l'imamat zaidite au Yemen , Leyden , Brill 1960 (French)

[edit] References

1. ^ a b Article by Sayyid 'Ali ibn 'Ali Al-Zaidi, A short History of the Yemenite Shi‘ites (2005) Referencing: Momen, p.50, 51. and S.S. Akhtar Rizvi, "Shi'a Sects"
2. ^ Hodgson, Marshall (1961), Venture of Islam, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 262
3. ^ Ibn Abī Zarʻ al-Fāsī, ʻAlī ibn ʻAbd Allāh (1340), Rawḍ al-Qirṭās: Anīs al-Muṭrib bi-Rawd al-Qirṭās fī Akhbār Mulūk al-Maghrib wa-Tārīkh Madīnat Fās, ar-Rabāṭ: Dār al-Manṣūr (published 1972), pp. 38
4. ^ http://hespress.com/...ew&EgyxpID=5116, http://hespress.com/...ew&EgyxpID=5116
5. ^ Introduction to Islamic theology and law, By Ignác Goldziher, Bernard Lewis, pg.218
6. ^ Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, Part 24, By James Hastings, pg.844
7. ^ The Idrisids
8. ^ Shi'ah tenets concerning the question of the imamate
9. ^ Article by Sayyid 'Ali ibn 'Ali Al-Zaidi, A short History of the Yemenite Shi‘ites (2005) Referencing: Iranian Influence on Moslem Literature
10. ^ Article by Sayyid 'Ali ibn 'Ali Al-Zaidi, A short History of the Yemenite Shi‘ites (2005) Referencing: Encyclopedia Iranica
11. ^ Walker, Paul Ernest (1999), written at London ; New York, Hamid Al-Din Al-Kirmani: Ismaili Thought in the Age of Al-Hakim, Ismaili Heritage Series, 3, I.B. Tauris in association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies., pp. 13, ISBN 1860643213
12. ^ Madelung, W. "al-Uk̲h̲ayḍir." Encyclopaedia of Islam. Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2007. Brill Online. 07 December 2007 [1]
13. ^ Article by Sayyid 'Ali ibn 'Ali Al-Zaidi, A short History of the Yemenite Shi‘ites (2005)
14. ^ The Gulf 2000 Project SIPA Columbia University

Edited by Al-Zaidi, 17 January 2010 - 04:07 PM.


#24 zaida

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 12:41 AM

Asalaamu alaikum bros and sis'.

I am interested in knowing more about what the Zaidis believe. I have done internet searches and have found very limited information.

This is all i can find so far:

Zaidi beliefs are moderate compared to other Shia sects. The Zaidis do not believe in the infallibility of the Imams, nor that they receive divine guidance. Zaidis also do not believe that the Imamate must pass from father to son, but believe it can be held by any descendant of Ali. They also reject the Twelver notion of a hidden Imam, and like the Ismailis believe in a living imam, or even imams.

In matters of law or fiqh, the Zaidis are actually closest to the Sunni Shafie school.

In matters of theology, the Zaidis are close to the Mu'tazili school, but they are not Mu'tazili...


Can someone clarify Zaidi beliefs or expound on them, please?

Maybe even if you suggested a link or a book I can read.

Thanks!

ws


I am also interested in finding out more about zaidism. I'm a muslim convert. I have started a blog where I have collected articles on this topic. It is zaidism.blogspot.com
If anyone has info about Zaidism could they please add it to my blog. In particular, where can I get Zaidi books in English?

#25 aladdin

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 03:34 AM

I am also interested in finding out more about zaidism. I'm a muslim convert. I have started a blog where I have collected articles on this topic. It is zaidism.blogspot.com
If anyone has info about Zaidism could they please add it to my blog. In particular, where can I get Zaidi books in English?






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