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Found 46 results

  1. alisayyed

    $350 Billion deal- A muslim view

    Most of you must be aware of the recent $350 billion weapons deal between saudi and trump, out of which deals worth $110 billions will be with immediate effect. As expected the military-industrial-complex(hereafter referred to as MIC)-owned most of the mainstream media is jubilant. In the words of trump- "Tremendous investments in the United States. Hundreds of billions of dollars of investments into the United States and jobs, jobs, jobs." Disclaimer- Trump, like almost all US presidents is merely a puppet, with more strings than an actual puppet. So I dont consider him to be very relevant. But the statement shows what the MIC wants the people to focus on. The whole exercise is nothing but a continuation of the US-Saudi policy of transferring the wealth from West Asia to the West in return for maintaining the saudi kingdom in its supposedly dominating position. Hejaz- The residence of the faithful Hejaz was supposed to be a place of refuge. It holds much more religious significance for the muslims than it has political significance for the MIC, the Saudis and their ilk. It was, and still is, supposed to be a place where any muslim from across the world can come and start living. And settle, if they wish to do so. This CANNOT HAVE BEEN RESTRICTED. Mecca, Medina, Jeddah and all the other religious places belong to the muslims and cannot be at the whims and fancies of some clan. The natural wealth, too, in and around these areas are to belong to all the muslims. The rulers are supposed to be the custodians, not owners, as is currently the case. At the most, they can take what they need and not what they want. The trillions of dollars that they have extracted and squandered is wealth belonging to all the muslims who were driven out of these holy lands, who wished to settle there, but cannot due to the restrictions in place and the poor and the needy and the other deserving muslims across the world, who need to be bailed out. One can object that since Saudi Arabia is an "independent" country, they can run their affairs as they wish. They can spend and squander as they wish. They can purchase $10 trillions worth of weapons. They can completely stop immigrants. And they can throw out the shias and the non-compliant sunnis if they wish. They can dole out the crumbs to the Africans Muslims to fight their wars in Yemen and other places. My point is, Hejaz was never supposed to be a normal, usual, like any other country. It is a place with utmost religious significance for the muslims and the People of the book. It should have been a place of refuge for the poor and those driven out. A place for those looking for spiritual emancipation. For the ones looking who wished to visit the various houses of the towering figures islam- the Ahlul bayt and the righteous Sahaba. The center which redistributed wealth from the rich muslims to the poor. And not be the extractor of muslim wealth and squanderer of haq of the muslims. Not to help bolster one of the most evil and hardcore anti-islamic forces, the whole gamut of the MIC, including its dutiful media. Not to support of the unjust system of the petro-dollar hegemony. Not to bribe the poor and malnourished nations with money to fight their wars against other weak nations. Conclusion- The transfer of the haq of poor, needy and the deserving muslims and the money which otherwise could have been used to develop islamic cities, give citizenship to the refugees and any other muslim for that matter, create more STEM graduates among the muslims and the others and so on, is being used for an utter devastating effect. It is totally unfortunate, I and, i am sure that all the informed and religious muslims, are completely opposed to this initiative and wish that circumstances occur which will kill this deal. PS- The old timers will remember that in 2010, a weapons deal worth $60 billion was signed between the MIC spokesman Obama and the Saudis. It was a huge news back then and a great PR challenge for the MIC mouthpieces. So they focused on the 'iranian threat'. Now they have a buffoon as a president. They want to use it as an advantage. They want the people to think- He is a buffoon, so he does not know what he is doing, cant blame him, there is no one to blame and no need to do so. Focus on jobs, people (happy face).
  2. SAUDI ARABIA - MOST RAPED COUNTRY IN THE WORLD (Warning contains Graphical Violence & unappropriated words) The Qatif rape case (Arabic: قضية اغتصاب فتاة القطيف‎) is a much-publicized gang rape case. The victims were a Shia[1] young woman from Qatif (Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia) and her male companion, who were kidnapped and gang-raped by seven Saudi men in mid-2006. A Saudi Sharia court sentenced the perpetrators to varying sentences involving 80 to 1,000 lashes and imprisonment up to ten years for four of them. The court also sentenced the two victims to six months in prison and 90 lashes each for "being alone with a man who is not a relative" in a parked car. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qatif_rape_case https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_in_Saudi_Arabia RAPE IN SAUDI ARABIA 5 YEAR DAUGHTER - YouTube
  3. What Israel is doing to Gaza or what Saudi Arabia is doing to Yemen
  4. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/18/saudi-arabia-talks-alliance-rebuild-iraq-return-arab-fold It seems a serious hole in the Shia world is in the making. Iraq is drifting towards its Arab neighbour Saudi Arabia, leaving Iran further isolated. The article says that Muqtada Sadr has long been a critic of Iran's influence. And Saudi Arabia is opening a consulate in Najaf. All this is very ominous of a greater Wahabi influence in the Muslim world and beyond. I personally think Iraq should move closer to KSA ONLY under the condition that they restore Jannat ul Baqi and agree to joint control of Mecca and Medina by all Muslim nations. What do you guys think?
  5. Shining

    Hajj

    Salam Alikom to all. We are aware that the government of Saudi Arabia has launched a war on the people of Yemen while also supporting and financing terrorist activities in some parts of the middle east. In such case, is it permissible that we go to Hajj, when we know that some of the money that we spend for the Hajj Pilgrimage, may be used by the Saudi government to finance it's wars and other terrorist activities? If we do go, doesn't this mean that indirectly we are financing the killing of innocent people in Yemen, Syria etc? Ma' Sallam.
  6. Assalamalaikum, I have been watching news .... Im still not able to figure out who are the good guys .... Can you tell me , which countries are the good guys... P. S: Dont be biased pls.. . Be Truthful n Honest
  7. http://us3.campaign-archive1.com/?u=1178e2df3e705d9efab20fb3d&id=6446a813f1&e=2b3fc21b11#awesomeshare Anyone from SC wanna attend ?
  8. ShiaMan14

    Saudi Girls Council

    Saudi Arabia launches its first Girls Council - with only men on stage Saudi Arabia creates a girls council to empower women — but where are the girls? Saudi Arabia’s New ‘Girls Council’ Looks Like It’s Missing One Critical Element ShiaChat without Shias? Gunfight without guns? Dinner without food? the list could go on and on...
  9. Ayatullah Nimr Al Nimr Executed http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35213244 إنا لله وإنا إليه راجعون
  10. Saudi Arabia has paid substantial money for a secret alliance with Israel, a US journalist claims in his study. If this statement is true, it may fundamentally change our perception of Middle East politics. The region's muddled relations, political and military alliances have long been a favourite subject for researchers and journalists studying the Middle East. Those familiar with the region are all quite aware that the area is characterized by an Israeli-Palestinian conflict as well as a Sunni-Shiite and a Saudi-Iranian opposition, which root in cultural, religious and political divisions. However, noted US journalist Robert Parry has recently published an in-depth article based on intelligence information, claiming that Saudi Arabia paid around 16 billion USD to Israel in order to buy the friendship of the Jewish State. Lobbyists for sale It is common knowledge that political (and other) lobbying has considerable traditions in the United States. Lobbyists promoting the interests of countries or economic groups often influence US interior and foreign policy decision making processes in a decisive manner. Consequently, Saudi Arabia has also begun to build a lobby in Washington, only to experience bitterly that the masses of law firms and PR specialists costing top dollar or even the exploitation of connections with such powerful families as the Bushes can never outperform the Israel Lobby in the US. Therefore, the Saudis decided to take a different approach: they bought the Israelis, writes Parry. According to the article, Saudi Arabia has given Israel around $16 billion over the past two and a half years, funnelling the money through other Arab states and Israeli development funds. If it is all true, the Saudis may have indeed bought the Israelis, since Israel was starkly opposing the agreement with Iran - and found several American backers along the way. Why Iran? Readers not quite familiar with regional affairs might not know that Iran and its religious Shiite leadership is a thorn in the side of another player beside Israel - Saudi Arabia, a key power in the Sunni world also considers the Shiite state as its archrival. The Sunni-Shiite division is one of the greatest fault lines among Muslim countries, which they not have been able to overcome. As a result, Saudis consider any pro-Iran governments in the Middle East as enemies, so much so, that they are apparently willing to ignore the solidarity rooted in the same culture and all-Islam togetherness. Not to mention that they turn a blind eye to the atrocities committed against the Palestinian people (who are also Sunni, by the way). So, Saudi Arabia is not in the least interested in a strengthening Iran. However, the lifted sanctions and Tehran's return to international politics would inevitably lead to a strengthening Persian state, and in a big way too, as Iran has all the capabilities to become a key state of the Middle East, similarly to Turkey. It seems such a dreadful outcome for the Saudis, who follow Wahhabism, a rigorous school of Islam, that they appear willing to ally with Israel to prevent it. Religious rigour does not seem to apply to foreign policy... Riyadh is not concerned about the bloodshed According to Parry, Riyadh and Tel-Aviv had a similar cooperation to destabilize Iraq, Syria and Egypt. Even though Iraq's central government had already been toppled by the US invasion, a Shiite, thus pro-Iran leadership that enjoyed the support of the population's majority was obviously not so close to the Saudis' heart, just as they didn't like the Alavite (a branch of Shiitism) Assad regime in Syria, either. This put Riyadh on the same side with Israel. Interestingly enough, the Islamic State that follows a wrong and violent interpretation of Sunni Islam happened to grow strong in this region. Notably, the terrorist organization that calls itself a Caliphate was not planning to annihilate Israel, but the Shiites living in the area. This is one more reason why ISIS may have seemed more likeable for Israel than the Assad regime, which has maintained religious peace but been relentlessly opposed to Tel-Aviv, even though the Islamic State destroys everything with unheard of brutality in the occupied areas. Palestinian cause on the sideline Although the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood gave a glimmer of hope for the Palestinians struggling to survive the air-tight blockade in Gaza, the world's largest outdoor prison for years, Saudi Arabia considered Mohamed Morsi's Muslim revolutionary and not anti-Hamas government as an enemy, so it joined Israel in backing the military coup and the new Egyptian leadership, which wasn't as friendly to the Palestinians as its predecessor but fit the Saudi interests much better. Hypocrisy at its peak As it is known, Saudi Arabia is one of the most radical Muslim states in the world. Its structure is based on Wahhabism, an ideology rooted in the quasi literal interpretation of Islamic religious principles and the most puritanistic traditions. Yet this country hardly ever receives firm criticism from the West, contrary to a democratic Turkey that tolerates religions other than Islam, or the undoubtedly theocratic Iran, which ensures parliamentary representation for religious minorities. In comparison, wearing a cross in Saudi Arabia may constitute a crime and power is concentrated in the hands of one single dynasty. And this country is a reliable ally for the United States and if Parry's article is correct, it is an outstanding sponsor for Israel against other Muslim states. http://jobbik.com/saudi_israeli_cooperation_secret_alliance_bought_for_money
  11. So, i want to perform a social experiment. I want to gather as much ridiculous Wahabi Fatwas as possible that we see online. And trust me i have seen some really out of this world and totally just crazy, crazy fatwas by these Wahabi Thugs. The only condition is that they have to be in video format and if possible with English translations for all of us to enjoy the monkey show. #5291 - Saudi Cleric Ali Al-Malki: West Tampers with Burgers, Whiskey to Induce Birth of Girls among Muslims (Archival) http://www.memritv.org/clip/en/5291.htm - This idiot read an article in China, never mentions the articles name, no source, who wrote it, who translated it, what exactly was mentioned in article but is willing to testify in front of God on day of judgement that since he read it in an article it must be true. I mean i am lost with words to be able to describe the shallowness of the intellect of this man and these are men who declare us Kafir and pray for us in the mosques to die and rot in hell.
  12. Mohammad Javad Zarif: Saudi Arabia’s Reckless Extremism THE world will soon celebrate the implementation of the landmark agreement that resolves the unnecessary, albeit dangerous, crisis overIran’s nuclear program. All parties hoped, and continue to believe, that the resolution of the nuclear issue would enable us to focus on the serious challenge of extremism that is ravaging our region — and the world. President Rouhani has repeatedly declared that Iran’s top foreign policy priority is friendship with our neighbors, peace and stability in the region and global cooperation, especially in the fight against extremism. In September 2013, a month after taking office, he introduced an initiative called World Against Violence and Extremism (WAVE). It was approved by consensus by the United Nations General Assembly, giving hope for a farsighted global campaign against terrorism. Unfortunately, some countries stand in the way of constructive engagement. Following the signing of the interim nuclear deal in November 2013, Saudi Arabia began devoting its resources to defeating the deal, driven by fear that its contrived Iranophobia was crumbling. Today, some in Riyadh not only continue to impede normalization but are determined to drag the entire region into confrontation. Photo Demonstrators opposed to Saudi Arabia gathered in Tehran on Friday.CreditAbedin Taherkenareh/European Pressphoto Agency Saudi Arabia seems to fear that the removal of the smoke screen of the nuclear issue will expose the real global threat: its active sponsorship of violent extremism. The barbarism is clear. At home, state executioners sever heads with swords, as in the recent execution of 47 prisoners in one day, including Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a respected religious scholar whodevoted his life to promoting nonviolence and civil rights. Abroad, masked men sever heads with knives. Let us not forget that the perpetrators of many acts of terror, from the horrors of Sept. 11 to the shooting in San Bernardino and other episodes of extremist carnage in between, as well as nearly all members of extremist groups like Al Qaeda and the Nusra Front, have been either Saudi nationals or brainwashed by petrodollar-financed demagogues who have promoted anti-Islamic messages of hatred and sectarianism for decades. The Saudi strategy to derail the nuclear agreement and perpetuate — and even exacerbate — tension in the region has three components: pressuring the West; promoting regional instability through waging war in Yemen and sponsoring extremism; and directly provoking Iran. Riyadh’s military campaign in Yemen and its support for extremists are well known. Provocations against Iran have not grabbed international headlines, primarily thanks to our prudent restraint. The Iranian government at the highest level unequivocally condemned the assault against the Saudi embassy and consulate in Tehran on Jan. 2, and ensured the safety of Saudi diplomats. We took immediate measures to help restore order to the Saudi diplomatic compound and declared our determination to bring perpetrators to justice. We also took disciplinary action against those who failed to protect the embassy and have initiated an internal investigation to prevent any similar event. By contrast, the Saudi government or its surrogates have over the past three years directly targeted Iranian diplomatic facilities in Yemen, Lebanon and Pakistan — killing Iranian diplomats and locals. There have been other provocations, too. Iranian pilgrims in Saudi Arabia have endured systematic harassment — in one case, Saudi airport officers molested two Iranian boys in Jeddah, fueling public outrage. Also, Saudi negligence was to blame for the stampede during the recent hajj, which left 464 Iranian pilgrims dead. Moreover, for days, Saudi authorities refused to respond to requests from grieving families and the Iranian government to access and repatriate the bodies. This is not to mention the routine practice of hate speech not only against Iran but against all Shiite Muslims by Saudi Arabia’s government-appointed preachers. The outrageous beheading recently of Sheikh Nimr was immediately preceded by a sermon of hatred toward Shiites by a Grand Mosque preacher in Mecca, who last year said that “our disagreement with Shiites will not be removed, nor our suicide to fight them” as long as Shiites remained on the earth. Throughout these episodes, Iran, confident of its strength, has refused to retaliate or break — or even downgrade — diplomatic relations with Saudi Arabia. We have until now responded with restraint; but unilateral prudence is not sustainable. Iran has no desire to escalate tension in the region. We need unity to confront the threats posed by extremists. Ever since the first days after his election, the president and I have indicated publicly and privately our readiness to engage in dialogue, promote stability and combat destabilizing extremism. This has fallen on deaf ears in Saudi Arabia. The Saudi leadership must now make a choice: They can continue supporting extremists and promoting sectarian hatred; or they can opt to play a constructive role in promoting regional stability. We hope that reason will prevail. Mohammad Javad Zarif is the foreign minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/11/opinion/mohammad-javad-zarif-saudi-arabias-reckless-extremism.html?_r=0
  13. ChristianVisitor

    Saudi vs Iran

    If war happened between Iran and Saudi Arabia who would have the advantage?
  14. British Government threatened with legal action to stop it exporting weapons to the Saudi Arabian regime Saudi Arabia has been accused of war crimes in its war in Yemen and ministers admit its army is using British weapons there The British Government could be taken to court in order to halt arms exports from British companies to the Saudi Arabian regime, campaigners and lawyers have said. Law firm Leigh Day, which is representing Campaign Against the Arms Trade, is considering legal action against ministers to force the suspension of weapons exports to the Middle Eastern autocracy. The United Nations said Saudi Arabia is breaching international law in its on-going war in Yemen and lawyers contend that it is unlawful for Britain to continue weapons export to the country if they are being used for atrocities. Leigh Day wrote to the Business Secretary Sajid Javis on 12 November to raise the issue but campaigners say the department could be breaking its own rules. The Government says it is complying with its international obligations. Rosa Curling, a human rights lawyer at the firm, said the Government was acting unlawfully if its weapons were being used to breach international law. “If there is a risk that arms from the UK could be used to commit serious breaches of international humanitarian law, and human rights law, then export licenses for these materials must be suspended immediately,” she said. “If this is not done, we believe the Government’s current decision to keep supplying Saudi Arabia is unlawful.” The Foreign Secretary Phillip Hammond confirmed last month that British-manufactured weapons are being used by Saudi forces. Most weapons in the UK are produced by private companies but the Government gives consent and licences all exports and has complete control over which countries can buy from British producers. Those used in Saudi are thought to include flagship Eurofighter Typoon aircraft and Paveway guided missiles. In August the UN Office of Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said Saudi Arabian attacks on civilian areas had clearly broken international law. “These attacks are in clear contravention of international humanitarian law and are unacceptable," UN under-secretary general for humanitarian affairs Stephen O'Brien O'Brien told the UN Security Council. “I am extremely concerned that the damage to the port of Hodeida could have a severe impact on the entire country, and would deepen humanitarian needs, making more people food insecure, leaving them without access to water or medicines, which could also mean the spread of disease." The charity Médecins Sans Frontières said the bombing of a hospital was a “war crime” as “a matter of fact”. Andrew Smith of Campaign Against Arms Trade said: “UK fighter jets and UK bombs have been central to the humanitarian catastrophe being unleashed on the people of Yemen. Thousands have died and essential infrastructure, including hospitals, has been destroyed. “The UK has continued to support air strikes and provide arms, despite strong evidence that war crimes are being committed. The Saudi regime has an appalling human rights record at home and abroad and these arms sales should never have been approved in the first place.” Saudi Arabia denies it has broken international law. It said the bombing of the MSF hospital was a mistake. Saudi Arabia is intervening in the Yemeni civil war on the side of the internationally-recognised Government. It says Shia Houthi groups who have taken control of most of the country are not the country's legitimate government. Apparent breaches of international law by foreign militaries using UK-produced weapons have been taken into account by UK courts before. In 2010 anti-arms trade activists who forcefully entered and broke machinery at a factory owned by an arms company near Brighton were acquitted of conspiring to cause criminal damage after a court found they had a lawful excuse for their activity. The damage to that factory was inflicted during the Israel 2009 invasion of Gaza; the activists argued parts from the factory were being used in Israeli fighter jets that were causing indiscriminate damage to civilian areas of Gaza. A Government spokesperson told the Independent: “The UK is satisfied that we are not in breach of our international obligations. We operate one of the most rigorous and transparent arms export control regimes in the world with each licence application assessed on a case by case basis, taking account of all relevant information, to ensure compliance with our legal obligations. No licence is issued if it does not meet these requirements. “We regularly raise with Saudi Arabian-led coalition and the Houthis, the need to comply with international humanitarian law (IHL) in Yemen. We monitor the situation carefully and have offered the Saudi authorities advice and training in this area." http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/british-government-threatened-with-legal-challenge-to-stop-it-exporting-weapons-to-the-saudi-arabian-a6776601.html I read a funny comment about this story: " Maybe the UK fell over and accidentally sold them the weapons? "
  15. Sumayyeh

    Hajj Tragedy 2015

    Salaam brothers and sisters, As you are all aware, this past Hajj season presented us with tragedies resulting in the loss of loved ones, including Mohsen Haji Hassani Kargar (a 27-year old world-renown Quran reciter--see pic below). The following clips are presented by Aliakbar Raefipoor*,and breaks down the Tragedy: Why & How it happened?Players involved?How Ale Saud (Saudi dynasty) got away? 1) Makkah Crane Crash: 2) Mina Tragedy: We need to be educated on why these events happened--they didn't happen by chance. *Aliakbar Raefipoor is one of the most acclaimed and strongest speakers on religious and social issues in Iran--he gets to the core of matters in a way that's unprecedented. I request everyone to subscribe to the "Aliakbar Raefipoor English" channel Please encourage others to also subscribe. ((((Salawat and Fatiha))))for all victims. In Memory Haji Hasani:
  16. Find out how differences within Islam shape attitudes on evolution and its most famous protagonist, Charles Darwin. Iran Military Vlog #4: Evolution and Islam Hello guys, I have a vlog on Youtube and In my playlist Iran and the Sciences I added a new video shedding some light on the treatment of biological evolution in Iran and Saudi Arabia. Note that I'm not a biologist nor at all involved in the natural sciences, and some statements may be simplified for general audiences. Most of my information is pulled from E. Burton's research on school textbooks in Iran and Saudi Arabia. .
  17. According to multiple media reports, the first Saudi soldier has been killed by the Houthis on the border, while 10 others have been injured. As a response to this and the Houthis capture of Central Aden, foreign troops have reportedly begun to land in Aden. Sources: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/02/us-yemen-security-aden-idUSKBN0MT0G820150402 http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/foreign-troops-reportedly-enter-aden-first-saudi-soldier-killed-north-195465762 http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2015/04/02/404380/Saudi-soldier-killed-on-Yemen-border http://www.almanar.com.lb/english/adetails.php?eid=204026&cid=23&fromval=1
  18. Shaykh Patience101

    Israel Joins Saudi Coalition

    According to Global Research, "Israel’s fighter jets have taken part in the Thursday Saudi-led airstrikes on Yemen." Don't know if this is confirmed. http://www.globalresearch.ca/israeli-fighter-jets-join-saudi-arabia-in-war-on-yemen/5439378 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_military_intervention_in_Yemen
  19. Iran commiserates with Saudis on king’s passingHomeFri Jan 23, 2015 8:57AMA view of the building of Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Iran has extended condolences to the Saudi government and nation on the passing of the country's King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham condoled with Saudis on the monarch's demise, saying Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif will, on behalf of the Tehran government, attend an official memorial service due to be held in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, on Saturday. Meanwhile, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also extended condolences to the Saudi government and people on the monarch’s demise. King Abdullah died at the age of 90 on Friday and his 79-year-old half brother, Salman, succeeded him. The king reportedly died at hospital, where he had been receiving medical treatment for several weeks. King Abdullah, who was admitted to the King Abdulaziz Medical City in the capital Riyadh in late December, had been suffering from pneumonia and was reportedly breathing with the help of a tube. The Saudi king’s death has raised concerns about the future of the oil-rich country in the face of anti-government demonstrations. Salman was named Saudi crown prince in June 2012 after the death of Prince Nayef bin Abdul Aziz. Salman has recently represented King Abdullah at most public events because of the monarch's ailing health. Salman bin Abdulaziz, the new king, will also serve as prime minister and defense minister in the Arab state. But the 79-year-old is reportedly in poor health and is unlikely to rule for as long as his elder sibling. http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2015/01/23/394394/Iran-condoles-with-KSA-on-kings-demise
  20. Half-masting of flags following the death of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, King of Saudi Arabia Half-masting instructions It is with great regret that we learn of the death of the King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, King of Saudi Arabia. It is requested that all flags be half-masted from 8am today until 8pm this evening. Any other UK national flags flown alongside the Union Flag when it is at half-mast should also be at half-mast. If a flag of a foreign nation is normally flown on the same stand as the Union Flag, it should be removed. Local authorities are not bound by this request but may wish to follow it for guidance. Devolved administrations are responsible for issuing instructions for the flying of the Union Flag on buildings in their estate and others as necessary. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/half-masting-of-flags-following-the-death-of-king-abdullah-bin-abdulaziz-king-of-saudi-arabia لعنة الله على الظالمين
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