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Found 51 results

  1. Sunni and Shia marriage

    Salam W Alaykum I am in a very confusing situation right now.. I have been stressing too much about it. I am originally a Shia Lebanese and live abroad with my family and have been doing it ever since I was kid. I always had in mind that I would marry a Lebanese girl since Lebanese suffer of extreme nationalism. For the past 3 months I have been dating an Iraqi girl who I adore and admire. I enjoy every second with her. When we first started talking she told me that her father is Sunni and her mother is Shia but she has very little knowledge of both, so she told me doesn't count herself as either. When we would go out, we would kiss (I know, haram) but I kissed her and then told her that what we are doing is wrong and we should do Mut'a (she was married before and I asked a Sheikh about it and he told me it is permissible). She was reacted in a negative way and didn't like the idea because in her point of view, kissing and such are not haram because we live in a different era etc. But I explained to her that that is not the way I see it and so on. After about 1.5 month I managed to convince her to do Mut'a and we are both happy. My goal with this girl is to marry her but right now she tells me she is more into Sunni because of her father (he is not even living with her) and her view on Shia is bit weird because she has only a couple of friends of Shia and they were bad people and her mother didn't teach her a lot. Right now, we are in a critical situation where I told her that if I want to marry her, I am expecting her to pray, eat halal food only and fast and I would prefer if she would be Shia and I told her that I could prove to her why Shia is wrong using Sunni and Shia hadith. But she is very upset and I know her point of view on religion is a little bit European since she grew up here. But I am willing to sacrifice a lot to change her mind and we are almost on the edge of breakup because of this. Please what are your views on this ? I am really stressing about this and in my opinion, if she is Sunni but loves Ahlul Bayt I would not have a lot of problems with it but I would still worry about my children since I prefer them to be Shia.. Please, ANY ADVICE/OPINIONS WOULD BE EXTREMELY APPRECIATED. AC
  2. DNA Research Shows Canaanites Were Not Wiped Out By Israelites BY DANIELA COBOS ON 07/28/17 AT 4:51 PM A study published Thursday found that the ancient Canaanites were not destroyed by the Israelites as the Bible says, but rather that they went on to become modern-day Lebanese. In a study conducted by the American Journal of Human Genetics, UK’s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sent researchers to extract DNA from remains of five people found in the former Canaanite city state of Sidon, a coastal city in Lebanon. The remains were estimated to be 3,700 years old. The ancient Canaanites lived in the cities Sodom and Gomorrah, which were reportedly destroyed by God, according to the Book of Genesis. The Old Testament Book of Deuteronomy said God told the Israelites to wipe out the Canaanites. “Do not leave alive anything that breathes. Completely destroy them otherwise they will teach you to follow all the detestable things they do in worshipping their gods, and you will sin against the Lord your God,” he said to the Israelites. Despite this passage, other parts of the Bible contradicted the idea that the Israelites exterminated all of the Canaanites, suggesting there may have been survivors. Researchers examined the entire genome of the nearly 4,000-year-old remains and compared it to the DNA of 99 modern Lebanese people. They determined that more than 90 percent of modern-day Lebanese ancestry could be traced back to the Canaanites. “The Bible reports the destruction of the Canaanite cities and the annihilation of its people; if true, the Canaanites could not have directly contributed genetically to present-day populations,” the study read. “However, no archaeological evidence has so far been found to support widespread destruction of Canaanite cities between the Bronze and Iron Ages. We show that present-day Lebanese derive most of their ancestry from a Canaanite-related population, which therefore implies substantial genetic continuity in the Levant since at least the Bronze Age.” Dr. Marc Haber, one of the researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said it was a “pleasant surprise” to analyze 3,700-year-old DNA found in a hot environment. “The present-day Lebanese are likely to be direct descendants of the Canaanites, but they have in addition a small proportion of Eurasian ancestry that may have arrived via conquests by distant populations such as the Assyrians, Persians, or Macedonians,” he said. The Canaanites are credited with introducing what is believed to be the first alphabet during the Bronze Age. http://www.ibtimes.com/dna-research-shows-canaanites-were-not-wiped-out-israelites-2571963
  3. This video was posted by Khamenei.ir website and I decided to share it with you good friends of mine.
  4. Male prostitution on the rise in Lebanon World's oldest profession the only option in Beirut for some refugee and undocumented migrant men. Destitute and desperate in Lebanon, some men are turning to prostitution [Paul du Verdie/Transterra Media] by Paul Du Verdie Beirut, Lebanon - In an economically troubled, conservative country where homosexual behaviour is taboo, a growing number of men are prostituting themselves to scrape together a living. When talking about his life "Hassan" hesitates, the words coming out with difficulty as he chain-smokes cigarettes and fiddles with his sweatshirt. His work could have him arrested, beaten up and jailed. Hassan, a 27-year-old Sunni from Iraq, is a male prostitute and has been selling himself for money in Beirut for a year. This was not a lifestyle that he ever wanted, but something he says was forced upon him. He insists he would have chosen another path "had I been given the choice". Hassan - who asked his real name not be used - was forced to leave his country after his family found out about his homosexuality and threatened to kill him. Fearful for his life, he fled Iraq and was smuggled into Lebanon, along with five other refugees, by an NGO he refuses to name. After a few months, he was evicted from his flat after getting involved in a fight. Alone, still unemployed and desperate for any way to make money, he heard about bars in bourgeois areas of Beirut where men would pay high prices to spend a few hours with young men like him. A couple of days later, a wealthy entrepreneur from Turkey picked him up at a gay club located in the heart of the capital. After a drink and a short discussion about prices, they left together. The next morning Hassan was given $400 from the first of what would become many "clients". He was now a male escort. 'Temporary situation' His is not an isolated story. "Fouad", a 20-year-old Christian student who fled from Syria to avoid being forced into the army last summer, now works in a hammam, or men's bath-house, near a tourist area of Hamra in west Beirut. Fouad, who also requested anonymity, gives "special" massages to any customer who asks. All of his co-workers are Syrian as well and offer the same kind of services. Instead of being paid by the owner of the hammam, they "rent" their position there for a fee, then arrange rates directly with the clients. It's a temporary situation. As soon as I have saved enough money, I will go back to Syria to finish my studies. - male prostitute in Beirut Like Hassan, Fouad says there was nowhere else to turn but to a life of prostitution. "It's a temporary situation," Fouad says. "As soon as I have saved enough money, I will go back to Syria to finish my studies." It is difficult to be sure whether he believes in what he says, given the ongoing civil war in his country, but like several of his coworkers, Fouad is eager to return to a normal life. In the meantime, he and the other sex workers wait, bare-chested with white towels tied around their waists, standing against a fake stone wall next to the entrance, hoping for - and fearing - a busy night. They are all young and healthy-looking. Some even joke and laugh, while others do not talk at all and never make eye contact with potential clients smoking shisha in the lobby. Easier than ever According to several NGOs working with male escorts, thousands of men such as Hassan and Fouad have turned to prostitution in Beirut, offering everything from sexual favours to simple company to their clients. Clients tend to be wealthy middle-aged men from Lebanon, Turkey, the Gulf states and as far away as North Africa. Some became escorts after arriving from a country torn apart by war, having nowhere to turn; others found themselves with bills to pay and children to feed with no chance of employment. The fact that one can anonymously use gay social networks such as Grindr or Manjam to meet clients in a matter of minutes - or look for potential ones in Beirut's gay bars, clubs or hammams - makes it easier for these male prostitutes to stay safe and to keep their job a secret. Despite homosexual activity being illegal in Lebanon, Beirut is widely regarded as the safest place for homosexuals in the Middle East. Police rarely raid the hammams and nightclubs - since their owners pay good money to avoid crack downs. The world-famous Lebanese band Mashrou Leila has an openly gay singer. And the younger generations tend to be more much more open-minded about sexual preferences than the older ones. This perceived safe haven is well known in the region, and has since made Beirut the go-to destination for Middle Eastern tourists wanting to express their sexuality more freely. Before the violence and instability in Lebanon turned them away, wealthy gay men from the Gulf countries were especially prominent, ready to pay up to a few thousand dollars - in cash, jewellery or designer clothes - for a night with an escort. But such high prices are by no means the norm. Most clients are understood to pay about $200 for a Lebanese escort. Syrian men reportedly tend to cost less, only $50 on average. But even at this low price, many Syrian refugees in Lebanon choose this option, given the alternative: desperate searching for terribly paid jobs. Syrian war's effect "There have always been male sex workers in Lebanon. It was common knowledge," says an outreach programme coordinator with Helem, a Lebanese LGBT-rights NGO. "But since the US invasion of Iraq, and even more so with the Syrian civil war, there are more of them than ever before." That is because many of the 1.2 million Syrian refugees in Lebanon have a difficult time finding jobs, and end up severely struggling to provide food and shelter for themselves and their families. In 2012, a study by the RAND Corporation showed among Lebanese and Syrian sex workers, about 40 percent and 68 percent, respectively, defined themselves as heterosexual. Since the Geneva II peace conference is showing little progress and the Syrian war rages on, poverty-stricken Syrians in Beirut have little chance to see their future improve any time soon. With many tourists avoiding Lebanon because of political unrest, the escorts may soon find themselves running short of clients. Hassan does not know what will happen then. "When I left my country and struggled to eat, I thought it could not get worse. When I started at the hammam, I was certain it could not get worse. Now, I do not know what to expect." A version of this story was originally published by Transterra Media. Source: Al Jazeera
  5. Lebanese parents

    Hello guys, I'm an 18 year old Lebanese guy living in the USA. I'm probably the most religious and smartest one in the family. I'm not saying I wanna get married now but I would like to get married like 2 years before I finish college (around 21-22). My mom keeps saying no, I have to finish college first and start a career job. I think I can work a decent job while I finish my studies and get married. I feel like all Lebanese parents are like that. Anyone else deal with the same? Thoughts?
  6. For instance, there are Lebanese that openly call themselves Muslim but they will drink, fail to pray, and wear short sleeves. Where as other Arabs like Iraqis and Gulf Arabs have the Janbiya(Bedouin headgear) and various other cultural attitudes and beliefs that facilitate in this case a closer association to Islam in comparison many Lebanese have abandoned the hijab and adopted feminist and liberal oriented lifestyle i.e. liberation from religion as opposed to following it. A close friend of mine told me that Lebanese were embarrassed to call themselves Arab with one person going as far to only eat French food to associate with another culture. I went through a quick search of each region and found these photos in the first search results: Lebanese: Iraqi: Gulf Arabs: Jordanian: Egyptian: Palestinian: Syrian: North African Arabs:
  7. To Whom This May Concern, My name is Hassan Mohaidly and i'm a young Lebanese-Canadian Entrepreneur. I have an important question in regards to which MARJA can I follow While growing up, my father followed Fadlullah and my mother followed Sistani. Growing up I never knew which MARJA should I follow. Now I'm grown up and I want to make a choice to which Marja to follow. And to be honest I don't want to follow someone just because somebody told me to follow him. So my QUESTION is since Fadullah passed away (PBUH) couldn't I follow his son? Also what are some of Fadullah's main teachings and philosophy compared to the other marjas? I'm an indivdiual that loves business and personal development, so is Fadullah's teaching the same thing? ThankYou
  8. As salam alaykoum wa rahmatoulahi wa barakatuh, I am a shia convert who lives in Montreal (Quebec, Canada), but I do not go to mosque, if I had to I would probably go to CCMM. I follow Ayatullah Fadlallah, and my husband's family is from Lebanon. CCMM's website doesn't update regularly (if at all) so I am never sure of exactly what date is today, and this is very frustrating when trying to say my duas on the right nights/days, ramadan, ashura, etc... Where (website), if it exists, could I find an updated (updates regularly throughout the year) hijri calendar? JazakAllah khairan!
  9. Does he even have any info and is it going to help? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4BTWZ1uJRI The son of Libya’s late leader Muammar Qaddafi has been kidnapped in Lebanon by militants demanding information about the fate of a Shiite cleric who went missing in Libya decades ago. Hannibal Qaddafi appeared in a video aired late Friday on local Al-Jadeed TV saying anyone who has information about Imam Moussa al-Sadr should come forward. Qaddafi appeared to have been beaten up and had black eyes but said in the video he is “in good health, happy and relaxed.” It was not clear when Qaddafi, who is married to a Lebanese woman, was kidnapped. Al-Sadr, one of Lebanon’s most prominent Shiite clerics in the 20th century, vanished, along with two other people, during a trip to Tripoli in 1978. Lebanon blamed the disappearance on Muammar Qaddafi. Alarabiya
  10. Hello there guys. I've recently tried to start vlogging again and the first video in a series about Hezbollah's relationship with Iran is online. The video posted is a short overview. Here's a brief description: Where does Lebanon's Hezbollah come from? What are the grievances that contributed to its establishment? A short introduction to how it all got started, in English. In August of 1994, then-State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism Barbara Bodine referred to Hezbollah as an Iranian creation. Despite the political color of her statement and of those preceding and succeeding her, the theory that Hezbollah is a foreign-imposed construct in Lebanon has also remained afloat in more serious discussions and literature. This short introduction corrects that view, arguing that Hezbollah is an organic and natural evolution within Lebanon. An evolution that gradually took place within the Shiite community following the end of the Great War.
  11. AOA. Does any body have a soft copy or link of the book, "Lebanon" written by Dr Mostafa Chamran Shaheed in Urdu or English? Thank you.
  12. Although old but this is a great speech given by Sayyed Hassan on the qualities of Imam Khamenei
  13. :lol: :rolleyes: :lol: The union of Zionists and Khawarij, after Syria now the two brutal movements are going to befriend each other in Gaza! Feel sorry-- for those who were so naive to express their support for such groups (no matter what) because these groups were oppressed and were confronting Zionists and caring for Quds... so now, I hope the case is closed. ---------------------------------- Israel's secret cooperation with Hamas Link: http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4650733,00.html
  14. Warning: contains music, some western-dressed women. Julia was born in Beirut, Lebanon on April 1, 1968 into a Greek Orthodox Christian family to a Lebanese father and Palestinian mother. She was educated at the Rosary Sisters Schools where she sang in the school choir. Growing up, she and her brother were heavily influenced by Ziad Rahbani's works. When she was 12 years old she recorded her first song, entitled "A Maman" at Elias Al Rahbani studios. This was introduced to her by her music teacher Fouad Fadel. She also recorded two songs, "C'est la Vie" & "Viens dans Ma Vie". On October 11, 2006, Julia announced a new single called "Ahibaii" (My loved ones). The lyrics are based on a letter sent by Hizbollah secretary general Hassan Nasrallah to the fighters in South Lebanon during the 2006 Summer War between Lebanon and Israel. The poet Ghassan Mataradapted the original text. The music is composed by Ziad, brother of Julia and arranged by Michel Fadel. The profits from the song's sale went to help the families of Hizbollah fighters and to all Lebanese who died during the Israel-Lebanon conflict. Sales eventually garnered three million dollars for the families of the Lebanese civilians, soldiers, security forces, and Hezbollah militants who have been killed in the Israel-Lebanon conflict. The sum was triple the original aim, which was only one million dollars. The families of Lebanese soldiers killed during operation Naher el-Bared also received a portion of the money.
  15. After all the warnings and all the clichés about a war that would “spill” over Syria’s border, the savage fighters of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s Sunni Muslim “caliphate” have at last arrived in Lebanon. So far, the Lebanese army has lost 13 of its soldiers in a costly battle with rebels to retake the north-eastern Sunni town of Arsal – on the Syrian border and hitherto a resupply base for Islamists trying to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad – while the conflict has generated the same gruesome events which followed Islamist victories in Iraq and Syria: reports of civilian executions, government soldiers taken hostage, at least 12 civilians confirmed dead, including five children, and the prospect of long and bloody fighting ahead. The world’s attention, of course, has been concentrated on the slaughter in Gaza. In the Middle East, tragedy must come one day at a time, so the Syrian civil war and the Isis takeover of western Iraq continued in the shadows of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. But the Islamists’ arrival in Lebanon and the prospect of a mini-civil war around Arsal – and perhaps as far as Tripoli – could have repercussions far graver than the Gaza war. As Islamists take over Lake Mosul and other districts from the Kurds in northern Iraq and press harder against Syrian government troops, their extension into Lebanon marks their furthest progress yet from the Tigris towards the Mediterranean. In Arsal, the fighters – officially from el-Nusra, whose own members are already joining those of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s caliphate – adopted their usual practice of seizing large buildings in the centre of the town (in this case, the technical college, a hospital and a mosque) and clinging to them in the hope that their opponents would disintegrate. The Lebanese army, which has twice defeated Islamist rebellions inside Lebanon in the past 15 years, claimed to have retaken the college, but the statements from both the Lebanese commander and Prime Minister may be taken as accurate: that the takeover of Arsal had been planned long in advance and is part of a far greater rebel strategy. The Lebanese army says it has so far killed 50 fighters – a tally that sounds very like the Syrian army’s premature claims of victory on the other side of the border – but government forces in Lebanon are unlikely to fall back. Sunni Muslims make up the larger part of the Lebanese forces whose units are among the best integrated of Middle East armies – and this has never prevented them from attacking and subduing Sunni Muslim rebels in the past, first at Sir el-Diniyeh in the northern mountains in 2000, and then within the Palestinian camp of Nahr el-Bared in 2007, at a cost of almost 500 dead soldiers, fighters and civilians. For more than a year, the Lebanese army has tried vainly to close the frontier east of Arsal, and a Syrian army victory over rebels in Yabroud on the other side of the border earlier this year suggested that Sunni insurgents might leave Arsal lest they be cut off. But their resurgence shows that the Syrians have nothing like the control they have been claiming in the frontier lands. Indeed, the Nusra men had no difficulty in seizing 15 soldiers and almost as many Internal Security Force personnel when they first struck at Arsal. A battle between those Sunni forces opposing the Assad regime in Damascus – who are also responsible for the bombing of Shia targets in Lebanon – and Lebanese troops was almost inevitable. Less than two weeks ago, Lebanese special forces in Tripoli killed Mounzer el-Hassan, a Sunni “jihadist” logistics officer who was reported to have given suicide belts to bombers who attacked Beirut’s Shia southern surburbs and the Iranian embassy in the capital. Those present at the battle said that el-Hassan was playing taped Islamic music as he finally died, when a hand grenade – possibly in his own possession – blew up in his face. His death followed shortly after the capture of Houssam Sabbagh, a Salafist militant who led Sunni militia forces in recent battles against Alwite Shias in Tripoli. Sabbagh, who has fought in Afghanistan, Chechenya and in Iraq against US forces, was one of the few Tripoli leaders who refused to participate in a government “security” plan for the city. there is more to this aritcle : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/isis-brings-its-war-to-lebanon--and-it-could-be-a-key-part-of-a-masterplan-9648009.html
  16. Leader: Armed Struggle Should Continue until the Zionist Entity Is Destroyed by a Referendum
  17. Hi, Can anybody tell me of their are sayyids with last name Obeid or obaid? Thanks
  18. News confirmed: Paki Army exporting Armaments and Salafi Shia killers to Syria. Worst part, its going to line the pockets of a few generals and a few political families and would not have any triclle down economic benefit to the cursed land of mass called Pakistan. http://www.dw.de/is-pakistan-aiding-syrian-rebels/a-17528187 http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/islamabad/01-Apr-2014/senate-concerned-over-change-in-policy-on-syria http://www.nation.com.pk/national/31-Mar-2014/arms-supply-to-syrian-rebels-to-damage-pakistan-more-us-expert http://www.brecorder.com/general-news/172/1168385/ There are unconfirmed reports circulating around Islamabad inner circles on almost 100,000 Paki Salafi terrorists being exported to Syria, Iraq, and Yemen to create more destabilization in Shia dominated regions. I wonder when would the payback hit the GCC nations? September 2014 maybe?
  19. Syrian army advancing in battle for rebel town near Lebanese border, field commander says SAHEL, Syria - Syrian government troops are tightening their grip on the last rebel stronghold near the border with Lebanon a day after taking control of a key village in the area, a field commander told reporters on Tuesday. Forces loyal to President Bashar Assad have seized a string of towns and villages in the rugged Qalamoun region along the Lebanese border since launching an offensive there in November. Backed by gunmen from the Lebanese militant Hezbollah group, the army seized the village of Sahel this week and is closing in on Yabroud, the largest town in the mountainous region still in rebel hands. The government operation aims to sever the rebel supply routes from nearby Lebanon and shore up its hold on the main north-south highway that runs through the area. During a government-led tour of the village of Sahel, a Syrian commander told reporters that troops ousted opposition fighters from the village Monday, bringing down the rebels' "first defence line" of Yabroud. The officer did not provide his name, in line with military regulations. Hezbollah guerrillas have played a significant role in the government push. The Lebanese Shiite militant is eager to clear the border area of the overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim rebels trying to topple Assad's government. Hezbollah claims that several cars used in recent bombings targeting predominantly Shiite neighbourhoods of south Beirut have been rigged in Yabroud. Al-Qaida-linked groups have claimed responsibility for several of the attacks in Lebanon, saying they were retaliation for Hezbollah's military support for Assad. Opposition groups said fighting was raging Tuesday on the edge of Yabroud, with government helicopters dropping barrel bombs on the town's outskirts. The makeshift bombs, which the government has used to devastating effect in other parts of Syria, are packed with explosives and fuel and are intended to cause massive damage to urban areas. Rami Abdurrahman, the director of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights activist group, said rebels fighting in Yabroud belong predominantly to hard-line Islamic groups, including the al-Qaida-linked Nusra Front and the breakaway group of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Syria's state news agency reported heavy fighting around Yabroud on Tuesday. It said the army destroyed a car fitted with a machinegun, and killed fighters from the Nusra Front and other rebel groups. The Syrian field commander said the army is determined to clear the area by launching a final assault from Sahel. He said "moral was high among the troops as they fulfil their mission" to capture Yabroud. Sahel was deserted on Tuesday as the government troops escorted reporters along. There was damage on several houses and a mosque, apparently from fighting, and telephone and electricity cables were torn from poles and strewn on sidewalks. At least one body could be seen on the ground. "It was a real battle and we didn't give the gunmen any chance to negotiate," the commander said. He did not say if the army or the rebels sustained any casualties, but said the troops detained more than 30 opposition fighters after capturing the village. Many of those captured were Syrians, the commander said, although there were also foreign fighters who had travelled to Syria from Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Lebanon to battle Assad's troops. Hezbollah in Action near yabroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9Ekr7mHQRE&feature=youtu.be http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yy-Ig3Lx_kE
  20. I was reading all over the news and many new stations say that lebanon wont be able to handle another war fighting Israel and fighting in the rebels in Syria. What do you think? Is that true?
  21. 1. Unchecked growth of Salafism in Syria which exploded into what Syria is today 2. Unchecked Salafism in Lebanon which is causing monthly attack on iranian interests in Lebanon 3. Loss of Iranian embassy in Afghanistan a few years back and rise of Taliban again 4. Iraq which has become literally a play yard for Salafis 5. Various Drug cartels using Iran as a conduit, 6. Routine killing of Iranian border guards at the hands of ragtag Saudi sponsored Baluchi Salafis.... 7. ... And the list goes on and on IRI's pre-emptive security apparatus seems to be utterly incompetent. Even Uganda secures its out of borders interests better than Iran. Somebody needs to look into this kiss-axx culture of IRI's bureaucracy and work on these incompetencies. Is the Wali Faqih watching this or are they even duping him too with the all rosy picture? And now this: http://presstv.com/detail/2014/01/05/343876/saudi-terrorists-death-suspicious/ How could any country allow such a big fish, tantamount of Mulla Umer in Afghanistan, to be so easily slipped away to the grave without having him share some of the secrets.
  22. A Lebanese family donated an artifact to the Museum of the holy shrine of Imam Hussain dating back to the Phoenician Age. Lebanese experts confirmed that the artifact dated back to five thousand years ago, during the time of the Phoenicians. The relic (40cm long and 20cm wide) is carved in the form of a ship, symbolizing that Hussein is the -Rescue Ship- as reported by Prophet Muhammad and hence the idea of the gift to the Museum of Imam Hussain. Sayyid Dhyai al-Deen, the Director of the Museum, said -Since the opening of the Museum of Imam Hussain, numerous artifacts were gifted from Ahl al-Bayt lovers.- It is mentioned that the museum celebrated with the family who gifted the artifact from the Republic of Lebanon that was provided by Dr. Kaplan Kaplan, Chairman of the Council of the South, responsible for building the infrastructure in southern Lebanon. http://imhussain.com/e_index.php?ac=news&id=37 Note: We are the International Media Unit in the holy shrine of Imam Hussain, Karbala Iraq. Our main aim is to spread the message of Ahlul-Bayt worldwide. Please join our Facebook Group at Hussein Revivalism Follow our Twitter account @ImamHusainMedia Instagram @imamhussainmedia Thank you, may Allah and the Ahlul-Bayt bless you.
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