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Found 25 results

  1. Charlie Hebdo May Now Be Criticized Because It Mocked White Texans Rather Than Muslims by Glenn Greenwald THE NEWFOUND FREE SPEECH crusaders borne of the January 2015 murders of 10 Charlie Hebdo cartoonists in Paris sought to promulgate a new and quite dangerous standard. It was no longer enough to defend someone’s right to express their ideas while being free to condemn those ideas themselves — long the central tenet of the free speech movement (I defend their right to free speech even while finding them and their ideas repugnant). In the wake of the Hebdo killings, one had to go much further than that: It was a moral imperative to embrace and celebrate the ideas under attack and to glorify those who were expressing them, even to declare ourselves to be them (#JeSuisCharlie). As a result, criticizing the content of Charlie Hebdo’s often-vile cartoons became virtually blasphemous. It became common to demand that one not only defend the right of the cartoonists to publish them but also, to show “solidarity,” one had to republish those cartoons no matter how much one objected to their content — thus adopting that speech as one’s own. Opposition to lavishing these cartoonists with honors and prizes was depicted as some sort of moral failure or at least insufficient commitment to free speech rights, as evidenced by the widespread, intense scornheaped on the writers who spoke out in opposition to bestowing Charlie Hebdo with an award at a PEN America gala. A dangerous conflation was thus imposed between the right to express Idea X and one’s opinion of Idea X. Of all the articles I’ve written in the last several years, perhaps the most polarizing and anger-generating were the ones I wrote in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo killings: one article that rejected the demand that one must celebrate and even republish Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons by criticizing those cartoons and illustrating the results of applying this new, dangerous standard (celebrate offensive and blasphemous cartoons by republishing them) universally; and then a series of articles defending the PEN America writers who objected to the Charlie Hebdo award on the ground that one could simultaneously defend free speech while refusing to praise, honor, and glorify those whose speech rights were under attack. The most dishonest and confused commentators distorted my critique (and others) of the content of Charlie Hebdo’s speech into an opposition to free speech itself. “When Glenn Greenwald castigates the dead Charlie Hebdo cartoonists for racism,” decreed the anti-Islam high priest of New Atheism, Sam Harris, “he’s not only proving that he’s a moral imbecile; he’s participating in a global war of ideas over free speech — and he’s on the wrong side of it.” Similarly confusing these distinct concepts was Quillette’s Jamie Palmer, who, after surveying my years of work defending free speech rights for everyone both as a lawyer and a journalist, somehow concluded that “it would seem logical to suppose that Greenwald’s solidarity with the staff of Charlie Hebdo could be taken for granted.” What was clear all along, and what I argued repeatedly, was that it was not a belief in free speech that was driving these demands that Charlie Hebdo cartoonists be honored and revered and their cartoons be celebrated. Free speech was just the pretense, the costume. Indeed, most of the political leaders who led the “free speech parade” in Paris (pictured above) had long records of suppressing free speech, and few of these new free speech crusaders uttered a word as the free speech rights of Muslims have been assaulted and eroded throughout the West in the name of the war on terror. What was driving this love of Charlie Hebdo was approval of the content of its cartoons: specifically, glee that it was attacking, mocking, and angering Muslims, one of the most marginalized, vulnerable, and despised groups in the West. THE PROOF OF THIS was delivered yesterday. Charlie Hebdo published a characteristically vile cartoon depicting drowning victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston as being neo-Nazis, with the banner that declared “God Exists”: because, needless to say, white people in Texas love Hitler, and it’s thus a form of divine justice if they drown. That led to a virtually unanimous tidal wave of condemnation of Charlie Hebdo, including from many quarters that, just two years ago, were sanctifying the same magazine for its identical mockery of Muslims. Yesterday’s assault on white sensibilities also led many people to suddenly rediscover the principle that one can simultaneously defend a person’s free speech rights while expressing revulsion for the content of their speech. The examples are far too numerous to comprehensively cite; some representative samplings will have to suffice. Here was Piers Morgan in January 2015, with a beloved tweet that was re-tweeted by almost 24,000 people: View image on Twitter Twitter Ads info and privacy Here was the same Piers Morgan yesterday: View image on Twitter Twitter Ads info and privacy For the crime of mocking white Americans, vehement scorn for Charlie Hedbo was commonplace yesterday. “An evil, despicable cover,” opinedNational Review’s Tiana Lowe, who nonetheless added that “the losers at Charlie Hebdo have a God-given right to publish it.” Infowars’ Paul Joseph Watson, long a fan of Charlie Hebdo’s anti-Muslim cartoons and an advocate of the duty to republish its content, yesterday announced that, actually, one may hate and denounce the cartoons while still supporting the cartoonists’ free speech rights: “The Charlie Hebdo cover is offensive & dumb, and I fully support their right to be as offensive & dumb as they like.” The right-wing actor James Woods announced: “So much for ‘Je Suis Charlie,’ I guess,” calling the cartoonists “French traitors” in a hastag he added. National Review’s Byron York, showing a picture of the new cover, was similarly candid: “Today, we are not all Charlie Hebdo.” One popular tweet, from journalist Jason Howerton of the conservative Independent Journal Review — who previously mocked news outlets for not showingthe full Charlie Hebdo anti-Islam cartoons — declared that one should not, after all, share Charlie Hebdo cartoons that one finds objectionable: “Was going to go off on Charlie Hebdo for that sick Texas cover. But then I realized that’s what they want. [Edited Out] you. I’m not sharing it.” It’s almost as if the glorification and praise for Charlie Hebdo that became morally mandatory in 2015 had nothing to do with free speech and everything to do with love of the anti-Islam content of Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons. This new rule that one must not only defend Charlie Hebdo’s free speech rights but also honor and praise its work seems to have disappeared rather instantly, violently even, as soon as its targets stopped being Muslims and began being white Americans. This person put it best: Twitter Ads info and privacy What happened here is beyond obvious: Charlie Hebdo was fun, delightfully provocative, bold, and deserving of awards when it was publishing mockery of Muslims. When its cartoonists began publishing exactly the same sort of thing aimed at white Americans, they became “vile,” “evil,” “despicable,” “losers,” and “traitors.” As the author Robert Wright put it this morning: “I’m guessing PEN won’t be giving Charlie Hebdo an award this time around.” The viral 2015 Twitter hashtag campaign would have been much more honest had it read: “#JeSuisCharlie (*pour les bandes dessinées sur les musulmans”): “#IAmCharlie (*for cartoons about Muslims).” Whatever else is true, let this episode bring about the full and permanent death to the new, warped principle that to defend free speech, one must celebrate the ideas under attack and honor those expressing them. It should have never been difficult to grasp the basic yet vital distinction between defending the right of ideas to be expressed and celebrating those ideas. Now that a Charlie Hebdo cartoon has been aimed at white Americans, offending white Westerners, it seems the wisdom of this principle has been rediscovered. Top photo: Prime Minister David Cameron joined other world leaders at the start of the defiant march through Paris, France, in the wake of the terror attacks at the offices of Charlie Hebdo. Glenn Greenwaldglenn.greenwald@theintercept.com@ggreenwald
  2. Australian Senator Wears Burqa in Parliament to Push for Ban By JACQUELINE WILLIAMSAUG. 17, 2017 Photo Senator Pauline Hanson wore a burqa in the Senate at Parliament House in Canberra, the capital, on Thursday. She said that she wanted to draw attention to her party’s push to ban full-face coverings in public.CreditEuropean Pressphoto Agency SYDNEY, Australia — Australia’s Senate is rowdy and raucous, and often compared to a schoolyard. But after the leader of the anti-immigrant One Nation party walked into the chamber on Thursday wearing a burqa, the room went silent. Then came the stunned responses: “oh” and “what on earth.” The party leader, Pauline Hanson, took her seat as political rivals watched astounded. Senators from her party laughed. Removing the garment, Ms. Hanson, who is not Muslim, said that the burqa, a full-body and face covering, should be banned in Australia. She said that she wore the veil to draw attention to her party’s push to ban full-face coverings in public. “I’m quite happy to remove this because this is not what should belong in this Parliament,” she said as the Senate met during parliamentary sitting week, in which lawmakers debate legislation and other matters. Photo Ms. Hanson. CreditReuters In a speech in the chamber last year, Ms. Hanson said that Australia was “in danger of being swamped by Muslims.” A recent report from the Trump administration referred to Ms. Hanson in listing her party as a threat to religious freedom. Critics say that Ms. Hanson, who represents Queensland, seeks to make Australia a country where only English is spoken and where non-Christian religions are invisible. Ms. Hanson said in a statement that she wore the burqa because she thought that banning full-face coverings in public “was an important issue facing modern Australia that needed to be discussed.” Such coverings, she said, were “oppressive, presented barriers to assimilation, disadvantaged women from finding employment” and “had no place in modern Western society.” Ms. Hanson’s actions drew strong criticism in the Senate. Attorney General George Brandis, a member of the conservative Liberal Party, denounced the move in an emotional speech in which his voice broke. He said that Australia would not ban burqas. “To ridicule that community, to drive it into a corner, to mock its religious garments is an appalling thing to do, and I would ask you to reflect on what you have done,” he said, referring to Muslims. Photo Senators applauding after Attorney General George Brandis, not pictured, criticized Ms. Hanson for wearing a burqa. CreditLukas Coch/European Pressphoto Agency His response elicited a standing ovation from one side of the floor. “I would caution and counsel you with respect to be very, very careful of the offense you may do to the religious sensibilities of other Australians,” he said. Mr. Brandis said that about half a million people practice Islam in Australia, the vast majority of whom are law-abiding “good Australians.” Ms. Hanson used her speech on Thursday to address terrorism. She said that the police had uncovered 13 significant threats since Australia raised its terrorist threat level to probable in 2014, calling terrorism “a true threat to our country” and saying that “many Australians are very much in fear of it.” Clive Bean, a political-science professor at Queensland University of Technology, said he “was not aware of a stunt quite like this happening in Parliament before.” He said that he was surprised that the president of the Senate, Stephen Parry, let it occur. “The danger of such a strong stunt as that is that it has the opposite of the desired effect,” he said. “The fallout is stronger against than in favor.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/world/australia/pauline-hanson-burqa-australia-senate.html
  3. Book: A closer look at Islam

    Dear Brothers and Sisters Salams In the thread titled “Who is Syed B Ali,” in the General Discussions forum, a SC member by the name of “Digital Ummah” has asked for some more information on my book. So I have decided to explain a few things here. As the SC ad says, the book is essentially a response to critics of Islam. If you read some anti-Islam books, of which there has been a deluge in the last 40 years, there are two weapons in the critic's arsenal: Quran- they distort the meanings of the verses and Hadith- where they endlessly quote the same offensive hadiths. I came to realize that I had to do two things for my message to be effective. I had to disavow the common acceptance by our Muslim brothers and sisters of those hadiths and historical accounts, which help critics slander Islam and our Holy Prophet (pbuh). And I had to demonstrate that their arguments were based mainly on malice. But I have not emphasised the word ‘malice.’ Instead, I have given them the benefit of doubt and called it ‘misinformation’. Since I am not a graduate of a hawza school and therefore cannot technically claim to be a scholar, I had to develop my strategy very carefully. And after careful examination of the pros and cons, I decided on the following: Distancing myself from the hadith books that are the cause of so much strife. I have argued that they need to be reviewed and revised. But I have not done this in the very beginning as it may put off some of my non-Shia Muslim readers. Explaining why the Quran is not a literal book. And explain the teachings of Islam in the examples of three of our Imams. Now please let me tell you what the different chapters do: The introductory chapter clearly tells the reader what the book is all about, that being, a response to criticisms of Islam. In chapter I, I have picked two specific anti-Islam books and tried to show how irrationally they arrive at their conclusions. In chapter II, I respond to a specific book that tries to show that Muhammad did not exist and at the same time tries to slander him. Double game! Chapter III is intended to be a rebuttal to atheism. Chapter IV consists of two parts. The first part explains the drift of the Quran without going into the details and the second why it is so difficult to understand it. Chapter V is a thematic collection of verses of the Quran. In chapter VI, I discuss the problems with hadith and history, which critics of Islam so avidly use to slander Islam. Chapter VII – IX show the high ideals of Islam in the example of three of our Imams. Chapter X is the closing chapter following by the Appendices, with some more Islamic teachings. Before you decide to buy, it might be a good idea to go through the preview which is given in the link to the ad I have placed. And should you decide to buy, I would also request you to buy through www.amazon.com. The reason is that if you write a review, which I would very much encourage you to do, Amazon reviews have a very high market effect. If you buy the book through another retailer, you can also write reviews but it does not have the same value as an Amazon review. Please note that I am not asking that you necessarily praise the book in your reviews but I am sure that whatever you write will help counter the effect of negative reviews If you have any questions, I will try to answer them to the best of my ability, for the next few days, after which I will be away for a while. I must again thank brother Ali, for his kind help in creating the ad that you see on the SC home page. It is an exquisite banner and it was indeed very kind of him. Thank you all kindly. Was Salam
  4. The man correcting stories about Muslims By Catrin NyeVictoria Derbyshire programme 19 January 2017 From the sectionUK Share Image captionEvery day, Miqdaad Versi searches newspapers looking for errors concerning Muslims and Islam When one newspaper reported last year that "enclaves of Islam see UK as 75% Muslim" last year, Miqdaad Versi's instinct was to challenge it. He believes errors in the reporting of Muslims have become all too common, and has made it his mission to fight for corrections. Miqdaad Versi sits in front of a rather geeky-looking spreadsheet at the offices of the Muslim Council of Britain in east London. He is the organisation's assistant secretary general, but the task in front of him is a personal project. The spreadsheet has on it every story published concerning Muslims and Islam that day in the British media - and he is going through them looking for inaccuracies. If he finds one, he will put in a complaint or a request for a correction with the news organisation, the press regulator Ipso, or both. Mr Versi has been doing this thoroughly since November, and before that on a more casual basis. He has so far complained more than 50 times, and the results are visible. He was personally behind eight corrections in December and another four so far this month. Image captionMiqdaad Versi tweets diagrams showing corrections and apologies made following his complaints In the past, corrections to stories were mostly printed when individuals were the victims of inaccurate reporting, but Mr Versi is looking at a whole topic. "Nobody else was doing this," he tells the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme. "There have been so many articles about Muslims overall that have been entirely inaccurate, and they create this idea within many Muslim communities that the media is out to get them. "The reason that's the case is because nobody is challenging these newspapers and saying, 'That's not true.'" Find out more Watch the Victoria Derbyshire programme on weekdays between 09:00 and 11:00 on BBC Two and the BBC News channel. See Catrin Nye's full film on this issue here. Mr Versi goes through some of the corrections from December. Five of them concerned a review into integration by Dame Louise Casey. The Sunday Times reported that "Enclaves of Islam see UK as 75% Muslim" in a preview of the review. This was incorrect, with the review actually citing a survey of pupils in one largely Asian school who thought 50-90% of the population in Britain were Asian. The paper corrected the article, and later apologised. As the same story was reported in other publications, it led to five corrections. Mr Versi highlights another article, concerning the Muslim president of the National Union of Students (NUS). She was accused on Mail Online of refusing to condemn so-called Islamic State, when she had openly done so. Also in December, he points out a report in the Sun on Sunday confused the identities of two Muslim individuals - one fighting against extremism and one accused of extremism. "Quite a mix-up," says Mr Versi. He has met several newspaper editors and has been pleased with the quick corrections he has received in some cases. But he is concerned that these revisions are not obvious enough to the reader. "Sometimes the corrections lack a clear acknowledgement of the error they made and often do not include an apology. In addition, they are rarely given the prominence of the original article," he says. He adds that while he is concerned with "significant failings" in the reporting of Muslims, the same issues "might also be replicated for refugee, migrant or other groups". 'No middle ground' One particularly high-profile correction in December last year - that Mr Versi was not behind - involved a 2015 article in which Mail Online columnist Katie Hopkins wrongly suggested Zahid Mahmood and his brother were extremists with links to al-Qaeda, after they had not been allowed to board a plane to the US. The paper and Ms Hopkins apologised and paid £150,000 in damages. At his home in Walthamstow, north-east London, Mr Mahmood says he has forgiven her. He now says it is not her original false accusations that he finds the most upsetting, but the public reaction. "First they were all against us when Katie Hopkins published the article, and then when she made the apology a year later - then they all turn against her. "There's no middle ground. It's not just about Katie Hopkins, it's the mindset of people - how they can very easily be led against somebody, or in favour of somebody." Image captionZahid Mahmood says he holds "no grudge" against Daily Mail columnist Katie Hopkins Mr Mahmood says he feels this kind of reaction is causing divisions in society, and - keen to do his bit for unity - tells the BBC he is formally inviting Katie Hopkins to his home for tea and coffee. "We have no grudge against her, and we would like her to learn and know that we are as British as she is. "In fact, my wife's grandfather and great-grandfather both fought in World War One and World War Two. They fought for the very freedom of this country." Mr Versi says he wants to improve community relations too. He thinks inaccurate reporting has far-reaching consequences, especially because negative stories are often widely circulated by far-right groups and then the corrections are not. Some free speech campaigners, however, are concerned about this kind of work. Tom Slater, deputy editor of Spiked Online, says these complaints could create a fear of reporting certain issues. "I, like anyone else, want a press that's going to be accurate... but what we're seeing here is quite concerted attempts to try and often ring-fence Islam from criticism." Mr Slater says he found a recent correction to a story about a suspected "honour killing" particularly problematic. Image captionTom Slater worries such complaints are attempts to "ring-fence Islam from criticism." In May 2016, the Mail Online and the Sun used the phrase "Islamic honour killing" in their headline. Mr Versi successfully complained to Ipso that Islam does not condone honour killings and that the phrase incorrectly suggested it was motivated by religion. The word "Islamic" was removed from the papers' headlines, and at the bottom of the articles they wrote: "We are happy to make clear that Islam as a religion does not support so-called 'honour killings.'" Mr Slater says he found that statement added by the papers "absolutely staggering". "We all know a religion is just an assortment of ideas and principles. What these papers were effectively asked to do, and what they did do, was to print one accepted interpretation of a religion - and to me this was just like backdoor blasphemy law." Mr Versi, however, insists his work is about ensuring the facts are right - not silencing critics. He says there are many examples where Muslims can be rightly criticised and he is not complaining about those. "All I'm asking for is responsible reporting." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38655760
  5. http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/upfront/2016/10/islam-myth-french-secularism-161007131555990.html [video]
  6. Follow Ahmed Shihab-EldinVerified account‏@ASE #France's women's rights minister said Muslim women who wear the headscarf are like "negroes who accepted slavery" I can't load the video, here is the link:
  7. Ever since, Graeme Wood, well known Islamophobe and anti theist, published his article "What ISIS Really Wants", the Western Media has been raving like mad dogs of how inherently violent Muslims are and have based their assumptions on this article. In this post I will examine the error filled logic behind this theory and how the Western Media seeks to delegitimize the voices of 1.6 billion Muslims while subsequently promoting their own "scholars on Islam" to a general audience that is ignorant ,lacks critical thinking and is uninformed on Islam. Additionally, before this article came out there was a tension in the air in which various organizations critical of religion and conservatives who hate Islam were awaiting for such a theory to arise so they could come to the occasion and have their own sentiments fulfilled hence confirming their own confirmation-bias. Additionally, this article came at a time when sensationalism and reactionary sentiments towards Muslims were at an all time high, and hence sought to reinforce these views. In this post I will be dissecting such arguments, disproving them with my own thoughts on the matter, providing links to scholars who provide a unique and informed view to the conversation, and showing how these types of arguments have no real substance but rely upon the ignorance of their audience, and sensationalism and reactionary like opinions to validate themselves. Also, I will be exposing the agenda of Graeme Wood against all religions, as he posted an article criticizing Buddhists in Myanmar who were perpetuating violence against Muslims, while subsequently instead of coming to the defense of Muslims, reinforcing negative stereotypes and also criticizing Islam and Muslims in the same article, all the while assuming that Buddhism promotes such violence which we all know is untrue, however, sell it to the right audience and they will believe it. As the great propagandist Adolf Hitler once said: “But the most brilliant propagandist technique will yield no success unless one fundamental principle is borne in mind constantly and with unflagging attention. It must confine itself to a few points and repeat them over and over. Here, as so often in this world, persistence is the first and most important requirement for success.” ― Adolf Hitler As also was emphasized in George Orwell's novel, 1984, say a lie enough times and it will become true.
  8. When Marco Rubio delivered his response to Donald Trump's comments saying "Islam hates us", he responded by saying his comments were outrageous, however, he delivered a purposely weakened defense of Muslims. Which was hardly even a defense considering he said "Islam has a problem" as I have written in my previous post. For anyone needing to catch up to speed here is a link to my previous post in which I fact check the debate: He only came to defend Muslims when in Bangladesh Christian Missionaries experienced hostility when trying to convert Muslims to Christianity, and gleefully remarked there were many Muslims interested in converting to Christianity in Bangladesh. As if he couldn't give a defense for the basic human dignity Muslims deserve he only chimes in his defense when it was advantageous to him. For instance, he said we need to build a coalition of Sunni Arabs against ISIS in other words if it wasn't for the support he needed from Sunni Arabs or if there were no Christian missionaries in Muslim countries he wouldn't have came to the defense of Muslims. In sum, on certain issues it seems the scathing hypocrisy from the Republican side is too much.
  9. Islamophobia: Cause & Effect

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEXl_sYwW8U
  10. Danger Meter?

    I've had to deal with racial issues aplenty, but I've never been Muslim and we've never had Muslims around " in the family" before. My husband has had his ears out since San Bernardino and is worried. He doesn't know how to judge the possible danger to SG and,by extension, our daughter. He is still uneasy since the past threatened shenanigans a couple of months ago. I heard him giving our daughter a talk on staying safe " you can't forget you walk around with a middle eastern Muslim man. I don't want anything to happen to either of you. Please be extra-careful and I think you might want to stay out of certain situations for a while."He really worried about them attending, even with her brothers, some of the gatherings on campus and that a lot of the Muslim guys hang out together very conspicuously. He thinks DD and SG are still at the age where they think they are pretty indestructible. DD , for her part, is sympathetic to our concerns but still thinks that we are over-protective. If anybody has any wisdom on this, I'd be grateful.
  11. Salams all, MashAllah, i'm so glad there are people willing to stand up to this sort of thing! http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/24/train-passengers-stand-up-against-racial-abuse-muslim-woman-newcastle-metro I know it doesnt always turn out like that, so well done the Geordies!
  12. MARK STEEL's the man :) Thursday 25 June 2015 I'm still waiting for white people to start apologising for Dylann Roof When will they finally condemn their own people's extremist tendencies? The Americans who make comments loudly after a major incident have been unusually quiet since the shooting in Charleston, so they must be preparing for an even grander screaming session than normal. For example, after the shooting rampage in a school in Connecticut, the National Rifle Association declared the solution is to arm teachers. So as black people are being shot at regularly, presumably the gun lobby will announce all black people must be given sub-automatic machine guns to protect themselves. Sarah Palin will insist that as poor black teenagers are most likely to be fired at, it’s the duty of the Republican Party to offer flame throwers to young blacks in Harlem, free with an ice cream to encourage as many as possible to arm themselves. CHARLESTON SHOOTING: THE NINE VICTIMS WERE MURDERED BY A TERRORIST, NOT A 'WHACKED OUT KID' The senators and news reporters have also been slow to demand all white people apologise for the shooting. But I expect soon there will be special investigations in which random white people are stopped in a garden centre and asked to condemn the murders, and asked why they did so little to stop it happening. And if they say ‘‘it was difficult to do much as I live a thousand miles away in Chicago’’, all non-whites can tut and say ‘‘how many excuses can they come up with?" Then there will be documentaries to find out where people like the gunman Dylann Roof get radicalised. A presenter will tell us ‘‘I’ve discovered the shocking truth, that there are hundreds of bars and golf clubs where people say blacks are criminals and all take drugs, and this is where the fanatics learn their crazy ideas full of hate’’, and decent folk across the land will scream they should all be shut down. Yet still the West allows white people to keep flowing into our countries. Surely the time has come to say enough is enough, and if we’re to protect the right of citizens to go innocently to church, we must eliminate these breeding grounds of white terror, by sending drones to bomb white countries such as Finland and Andorra. Some so-called ‘‘moderate’’ white people might say Dylann Roof was not representative of all whites, but we need to ask why they’re not doing more to integrate the terrorists into civilised black ways. Universities such as Harvard or Yale, where most students are white and therefore susceptible to the radicals’ message, should stop teaching yachting and rowing, and make everyone play basketball on a court with potholes, in a block where police sirens never stop wailing. Many figures in the white community seem to be in denial about the crazy views of the people they sit next to. After the shooting in Charleston, Jeb Bush said: “I don’t know if the attack was racially motivated.” To be fair to him, there weren’t many clues, except for the gunman’s confession that he was a white supremacist with a manifesto for creating a white America, and the way he screamed “you’re taking over our country” to a church full of black people. But that’s not much to go on, and we can hardly expect a presidential candidate to be Inspector Morse. Another Republican candidate, Rick Santorum, said the shooting was an attack on Christians, adding “What other rationale could there be?” And indeed, faced with the scant evidence at hand, it’s clear the gunman hated Christians and hardly noticed the coincidence that everyone he was firing at was black. Similarly when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbour, the motivation was that they really hated harbours. They were sick of them, with their annoying jetties and boats that can’t sit still without bobbing up and down. Another candidate, Senator Lindsey Graham agreed the target was “Christians, not African-Americans”, and added his own theory, “Dylann Roof was just one of those whacked-out kids”. It’s the same with the Ku Klux Klan. So many people jump to the conclusion that racism plays some part in their ideology, while ignoring the more obvious conclusion that they’re all a bit whacked out, probably as a result of stress from exams. Fox News presenters pursued the line that the shooting wasn’t motivated by race and was “not a hate crime”. But that’s the trouble these days, you can’t even gun down a crowd of black people in a black church, screaming you’re doing this because they’re black, without someone deciding you’re being racist. That’s where political correctness has taken us. One sign that there are other people in South Carolina who retain some sense of white superiority, is that the cities are full of Confederate flags and statues. The argument for keeping the flag has always been that it represents all sorts of things, such as the scent of the magnolia flower and paddle steamers up the Mississippi, but unfortunately some people ignore all this and make an issue of how it was the flag of the war to keep slavery. How petty, to let one little incident spoil the image of a pretty flag with lovely shapes. It’s the same with Bin Laden, he made all those entertaining short films and sported a charming beard but he’s only remembered for the times he lost his temper. If only someone had understood that Bin Laden had no long-term aims, he was just one of those whacked-out kids. Many Southern states also have statues of Confederate generals such as Robert E Lee, but instead of making a fuss about everything, perhaps black people should learn to accept statues of people who raised armies to keep them as slaves, just as in England we’d be perfectly happy for anyone to erect a statue of Hitler in Trafalgar Square. So the Republicans and US networks will soon get round to demanding the whole white population is guilty for this shooting. Or one of them will tell us Dylann Roof was an idiot, because if he’d said he thought everyone in the church was armed and he was only acting in self-defence, he’d have been found not guilty and given a job in the South Carolina police. http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/a-black-church-shooting-proves-its-not-terrorism-if-its-a-white-murderer-10345907.html
  13. Criticism Of Islam

    Salam everyone, I made a blog with the intention to "answer" the common criticisms of Islam by Islamophobes using evidence, rationality, and references. It has answers to the following questions so far: Does Islam promote violence towards peaceful non-Muslims?Are there verses in the Quran that allow violence towards peaceful non-Muslims?Was Islam spread by the sword?What's the Jizya?Does Islam say all non-Muslims will go to hell?What's the penalty for apostasy in Islam?Is Islam misogynistic?Does Islam promote domestic violence?Does Islam allow pedophilia? I provided evidence for my answers using evidence from Quran and hadiths. If you have any further evidences (hadiths/Quran/statistics/science) that may be helpful in answering such questions, or other common questions that should be addressed, please tell me! Any feedback would be much appreciated! I hope this blog is helpful to anyone defending Islam against common criticisms and accusations. Please feel free to use any content in it.
  14. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3iGYcfi3hI
  15. Salaam, Im a graduate student & need to work to cover my univ expenses. Im not a hijabi & dress very modern but more modest than western women, but most ppl can tell Im Muslim / middle eastern from my name. so I was recently working as a street canvasser for the past 3+ months for a human rights org that preaches racial equality and equal representation of all workers & bull[Edited Out] like that. Ive been facing some racism at this job and i think its cuz of my name? my coworkers were super nice when I first started but later started changing towards me & ive been getting this vibe that they want me to leave. its a close knit circle of all "american white folks" w/ few blacks & i feel that they try to make job standards harder for other ethnicities so they quit. its such a load of bull[Edited Out] Im fed up w/ it and feeling they all downright FAKE 100%. they talk non-stop about human rights and racial equality BUT I DON'T SEE IT !! after the 1st month they insisted to know where Im from, so I just said 'Western Asia' and swore I wudnt tell anyone cuz i wanna escape this discrimination problem. after that I think one person from the office found out I was Muslim & middle eastern & probably told everyone then their attitude towards me changed. they started excluding me from morning activities which i used to take part in and not let me validate credit cards & stuff like that. then I realised they wud give higher positions to new members (americans) who just started the job, & dismiss me even tho I been there for 3+ months. what kind of bull[Edited Out] hipocrisy is this??? and to make worse, I realise they kept assigning me to harder locations & neighbourhoods where I wud end up not making enough money to cover my requirements as a canvasser. Also, right now the weather is crazy in my state and ppl on the street are freaking cold nobody wanna stop and bother w/ canvassers. but at the office, the directors act like its my fault for not making enough money & blame me for poor skills !!!! I dont see them doing that to my other american coworkers who also dont get enough money either, its not just me bringing low profits. I feel like they trying to prevent me from staying on the team, like I realised twice at canvassing that the manager wud pull us out for long 10 min breaks during our shifts for no apparent reason. I figured they doing this to waste my time so I only have few mins left at the shift and preventing me from getting potential donors who wud possibly give me money. Today they told me this was my last week to raise a certain amount & if I dont they fire me!! this is really unfair, on many days I actually make more than my american counterparts, I dont get why Im being put on review?? Shud I leave for good before they let me leave? What do u guys think? Im so fed up, this isnt the 1st time Ive faced racial & religious discrimination at the workplace in the US. ppl are sooo racist here, they prefer their own kind (Americans/Europeans) and bull[Edited Out] to all other species. I stopped telling ppl where Im exactly from for a VERY GOOD reason but somehow they inevitably find out or "realise" it. Before this job, last yr, I got into deep trouble where I worked at a cafe/restaurant & even tho most of the coworkers were Muslim & eastern, I wasn't getting along with this Christian Arab guy who chose to piss ME off on a daily basis for no reason. i was soo mad so I started talking bull[Edited Out] about him to one of my "sister" coworkers about how even in a 97% Muslim workplace, we still find racist ppl who bother us ! Then the boss actually confronted me about it and claimed I was the one discriminating against the Christian Arab guy !! I was speechless . Turns out, this "sister" ended up telling on me & the boss twisted the whole story to his liking & I got fired. It's sad how Muslims today back stab each other like that :no: I was wondering if you guys have experienced or gone thru racial/ religious discrimination like that in a workplace in Western societies?? How did you know it was cuz of ur ethnic/ religious background? (Maybe Im being overly sensitive?) And how did you guys deal or cope w/ such issues?? Thanks, salaam alaikum
  16. You Don't Like the Niqab? Get Over Ithttp://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/robin-lustig/niqab-ban_b_3959671.html?utm_hp_ref=tw Give me one good reason why a woman shouldn't be allowed to cover her face in public if that's what she wants to do. You don't object to her covering her buttocks, do you, or her breasts? Do you find it offensive if a woman wears sunglasses? And anyway, what's it got to do with you? Yes, I deliberately phrase the questions provocatively. I do so because I find the amount of cant that's been spoken and written on the subject of the "Muslim face veil" (note the first adjective, to which we shall return) frankly ridiculous. Oh, and before you ask, yes, I do think this is an important issue, even though only a tiny, tiny number of women in Britain choose to wear the niqab, or face veil. It's important because it's about what kind of society Britain wants to be in the 21st century. There'll be other opportunities to return to Syria, Iran, Germany, and even the Lib Dems. This week, I want to write about women's faces. Here goes. Reason one: "It's not acceptable for people to cover their faces in public so that they can't be recognised." Really? So should we ban men wearing hoodies or face-concealing crash helmets? Women wearing outsize sunglasses even in the pouring rain? Anyone wearing a face mask because they're scared of catching flu from someone on the bus? I think not. Reason two: "It's a symbol of male oppression of women and often imposed on women by fathers and/or husbands as a means of control." Well, yes, sometimes it is, but sometimes it isn't. Some women's fathers/husbands insist that they wear skirts below the knee, or long sleeves -- but is clothing choice really a matter for legislation? And if you argue that even when women choose to cover their faces of their own free will, it's only because they wish to avoid lascivious male attention -- well, isn't that why women cover their breasts? Reason three: "It makes me feel uncomfortable because it's entirely alien to who we British are." Hmm. Who's "we" in that sentence, I wonder? We, the British Hasidic Jews of Stamford Hill, where the women wear wigs and woollen stockings, and the men wear long frock coats, wide-brimmed hats and side-curls? We, the British Sikhs of Coventry or Leicester, who wear turbans? Or we, the British Catholic nuns who wear cowls and wimples? I'm old enough to remember the rows over whether Sikh bus conductors should be allowed to wear turbans instead of peaked caps, and whether Sikh motor-cyclists should be allowed to roar around the streets without crash helmets. I remember the debates over whether schoolgirls from Pakistani backgrounds should be allowed to wear trousers to school, or special swimming costumes for their swimming lessons. I thought we'd moved on, and that Britain had learned to accept that minorities have rights too. Reason four: "It's important to be able to identify people, and you can't do that if you can't see their face." True, so in those circumstances -- in airports or police stations or court-rooms, for example -- where identities need to be checked, you can easily make arrangements to enable women with covered faces to reveal themselves in a private place. (We don't expect women travellers at airports to be body-checked by men, so if their wishes can be met, why not those of niqab-wearers?) As for teachers, doctors or nurses, or others whose jobs entail dealing with members of the public, if it's an issue, write it into their contract. The vast majority of Muslim women do not cover their faces, so I see no problem with religious discrimination legislation in saying: "You want to work as a teacher, or a doctor? Fine, no face veil." (By the way, even in ultra-strict Iran, contrary to mythology, women are not required to cover their faces.) I find it intriguing that most of the people who sound off on this issue are men. Why do they feel so threatened by women who don't want their faces to be looked at? Why do they think it's any of their business? Personally, I'm not wildly keen on women with metal studs in their lips, or men whose low-hanging underwear reveals far more than I would ever wish to see -- but I wouldn't dream of banning items of clothing simply because I don't like them. When a man says: "Women shouldn't be allowed to cover their faces in public", what I hear is: "I'm a man, and I have the right to tell you, a woman, how to dress." Sorry, not acceptable. Ah yes, I nearly forgot. Muslim. It's that word again. The word that seems to be inextricably linked in so many people's minds to other words like extremism, fundamentalism, terrorism. So if the niqab is Muslim, then, in the blink of an eye, the women who wear it must be extremists, fundamentalists or terrorists. No, actually. Most of them are simply women who, for reasons of their own, whether good or bad, have decided to cover their faces. Would I be happy if my daughter wore a niqab? No, I wouldn't -- but then what I want her to wear has rarely been a major factor in her thinking. Nor should it be. Because what other people choose to wear is nothing to do with me, or with you. You don't like the niqab? Get over it.
  17. Half of Britain’s mosques have been attacked since 9/11There remains ‘a lack of political will’ to tackle Islamophobia, warns Government adviser Around half of mosques and Muslim centres in Britain have been subjected to Islamophobic attacks since 9/11, academics have warned as the far-right English Defence League prepares to march to the south-London scene of Drummer Lee Rigby’s murder. The figures are highlighted in a report which also found that the number of anti-Islamic attacks increased by as much as tenfold in the days following the Woolwich attack. Meanwhile, research by The Independent shows Islamophobic attacks spreading across Britain, with mosques being set alight and Muslims targeted at home in the past month. Despite the warning signs, a senior Government adviser told The Independent that there remains a “lack of political will” to take on the rise of Islamophobic attacks in Britain. The adviser, who did not want to be named, said that attempts to “tackle this issue – even before Woolwich – struggled to attract buy-in,” with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Eric Pickles, identified as the primary source of frustration. The Muslim community was warned yesterday of the dangers it faces from hate groups in a sermon delivered at 500 mosques. The piece said that high-profile cases of sexual grooming of children by small groups of Muslim men “hitting the headlines in a short space of time and the fallout from the Woolwich case will create a major challenge for the Muslim community”. The trial date for the two men accused of murdering Drummer Rigby, Michael Adebolajo, 28, and Michael Adebowale, 22, will begin on 18 November, it was announced yesterday. Professor Nigel Copsey, of Teesside University, the author of the new report which showed that between 40 and 60 per cent of mosques and other Islamic centres (around 700) had been targeted since 9/11 – said: “There has undoubtedly been a spike in anti-Muslim incidents since the Woolwich murder. An obvious concern now is whether the number of hate crime incidents return to ‘normal’ levels or whether Woolwich has been a game-changer in terms of increasing the underlying incidence of anti-Muslim hate over the longer term.” His report is based largely on figures from the Islamophobia watchdog Tell Mama. It shows an increase of attacks to nearly nine per day in the immediate aftermath of the Woolwich killing, but settling back to around two per day over in the following weeks. Prof- essor Copsey added: “What is significant about our analysis is the extent to which the far right is implicated in anti-Muslim hate crime.” Just this week, swastikas and the letters “EDL”, “KKK” and “NF” were sprayed on the walls of a mosque in Redditch. There were also reports of pigs’ heads being left at Muslim families’ homes and other attacks against individuals. There was also a attack on an Islamic centre in north London. But Dr Matthew Goodwin, associate fellow at Chatham House and an expert on extremist groups, said that “the broader picture is more positive than we think. Young people are more at ease accepting Muslims in society.” A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Local Government said: “There is no place for anti-Muslim hatred or any kind of hatred in Britain, and we are committed to tackling this unacceptable scourge.” http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/half-of-britains-mosques-have-been-attacked-since-911-8679304.html
  18. It's time to face up to the problem of sexual abuse in the white community Every day across Britain, it seems, there's a new and horrific revelation of sexual abuse: last week we had the guilty plea of veteran TV presenter Stuart Hall, who confessed to 14 cases of indecent assault against 13 girls, the youngest only nine years old. Days earlier the possible scale of child abuse in north Wales children's homes was revealed. We now know there were 140 allegations of historical abuse between 1963 and 1992. A total of 84 suspected offenders have been named, and it's claimed the abuse took place across 18 children's homes. But after the shock has subsided and we have time to reflect on these revolting crimes, the main question in most reasonable people's minds must surely be: what is it about white people that makes them do this? Jimmy Savile is alleged to have abused 300 young people, and in his case and in north Wales, the abuse could not have happened without a wide range of co-conspirators either grooming children or ensuring the truth never got out. Hardly a week goes by without another white man being arrested in connection with sexual abuse. I'm beginning to feel sorry for whites. I have many white friends and I know most of them are wholly opposed to sexual abuse. But they must be worried that their whole community is getting a bad name. I can imagine that, every day, with each unfolding case, they must be hiding their face behind their hands, pleading: "Please, God, don't let it be a white person this time." And with so many senior community figures implicated, many of us are starting to wonder what will happen to the next generation of whites. How will today's young whites learn that abuse is wrong when their role models are so tarnished? First, though, we need to find out what's causing the problem. Is it something to do with white people's culture? Is it something to do with their loss of empire, and their new role in the world, as a diminished state desperately clinging to its glorious past? Do they seek to impose their last vestiges of power on the most vulnerable in society? Or is it that, having spent so much of their history waging wars against each other, they cannot cope with the relative peace of the last half-century, and their frustration at not fighting is taken out on the weakest? I may have no evidence for this, but that's not going to stop me putting it out there as a cause. Or maybe it's their religion? Child abuse in the priesthood has, of course, also been tolerated for decades, allowed to continue unpunished through a conspiracy of silence among the church hierarchy. And despite the recent falls in attendance, Christianity still dominates European culture. And the Bible, which many whites still look to, has such verses as: "Do not withhold discipline from a child; if you strike him with a rod, he will not die. If you strike him with the rod, you will save his soul from Sheol [hell]." (Proverbs 23:13-14) It hardly fits with white society's claims to care for children. And even those who don't believe, such as Richard Dawkins, a senior cleric in the atheist community, have sought to downplay the gravity of child abuse, believing it's no worse than religion itself. As he wrote: "Horrible as sexual abuse no doubt was, the damage was arguably less than the long-term psychological damage inflicted by bringing the child up Catholic in the first place." Of course, what we really need now is for brave white community leaders to come out and distance themselves from the abusers. Maybe, say, the new head of the Equality and Human Rights Commission should come out and admit the issue is "racial and cultural" and that she fears that "in those communities there were people who knew what was going on and didn't say anything, either because they're frightened or they're so separated from the rest of the communities". Or a white cabinet member could say: "There is a small minority of white men who believe that young children are fair game. And we have to be prepared to say that. You can only start solving a problem if you acknowledge it first." Or the head of a leading children's charity could say: "There is very troubling evidence that whites are overwhelmingly represented in the prosecutions for such offences." Yet none of this has happened. And this saddens me. Because until we hear those brave voices speaking out against abuse, what are we meant to think? I urge white people to break this conspiracy of silence. Call on your leaders to show leadership. To show us all that you're not like the people who dominate the news headlines. That you really do care about protecting children. You may think all the above is ridiculous; that I'm stirring ethnic tensions on an issue that is clearly about individuals and small groups of people and has nothing to do with race or religion. And that by making this spurious case I'm ignoring the core issue, which is that children, many of them in vulnerable situations, were terrorised and physically harmed by opportunistic men who were able to get away with their crimes for years. You'd be right. But all of the above arguments were made within various parts of our print and broadcast media when similarly small numbers of Muslim men were revealed to be grooming young girls for sex. If you think the claims about white people are wrong, then so is the stereotyping of Britain's Muslims, and the widespread questioning of their culture and their religion, because of the perverted actions of a few. Since the "black crime shock" tabloid stories of the 1980s, editors have known that stoking fears about misunderstood minorities is good for sales. If you object to this article, then you should understand how it feels to be a Muslim reading similar pieces pandering to Islamophobia day after day – and you should object to those too. http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/06/sexual-abuse-in-white-community READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE BEFORE YOU COMMENT
  19. (salam) This is a public service message to the community at large in regards to an individual who is purporting to be a scholar of the howza. I am aware of the sensitive nature of these types of subjects, and I am only doing this as a duty for the believers to not become misguided by such individuals. This particular individual has been warned by others about his behavior but thus far has not heeded these words. His own statements and behavior actually expose him on their own, and when reading the things that he writes one can see clearly already that he is not a person who carries the akhlaq and wisdom of Ahlulbayt (as). However what is important here is he is damaging the institution and the Maraja in the eyes of the people. This individual is going by the name of "Brother Tawheedi". He has set up for him self a facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/BrotherTawhidi As well as a twitter page: https://twitter.com/BrotherTawhidi He is also in the process of starting his own website, which (alhamdulillah) at this point is not functional: http://www.tawhidi.com/ He has been speaking at various venues internationally.
  20. The 10 Most Islamophobic Moments in the 2012 Elections A great list of the ten most Islamophobic moments in the 2012 elections by Salon writers, Jillian Rayfield and Alex Seitz-Wald. It’s hard to dispute the list, but then again there is so much to chose from. The 10 most Islamophobic moments in the 2012 elections (Salon.com) When we’re all proven wrong and living in a bacon-less hellscape of Shariah law ruled by the iron fist of Mullah Obama, we can’t say we weren’t warned. According to the right-wing fringe, racism is dead — but long live Islamophobia, for there is jihad in every mosque and we must be vigilant. But Islamophobia — even from elected officials — is still dramatically undercovered by the media. So you might easily have missed some of these 10 most disgraceful examples of bigotry, ignorance and hate — from obscure county parties to the halls of Congress — during an election cycle with plenty to go around: 10. Allen West is Allen West – Florida Rep. Allen West is known for making inflammatory statements about pretty much everyone, but he has particularly targeted Muslims. This cycle alone, he’s commemorated 9/11 by screening an anti-Islamic film,said that Democratic Rep. Keith Ellison “really does represent the antithesis of the principles upon which this country was established,” and another time theorized that “George Bush got snookered into going into some mosque, taking his shoes off, and then saying that Islam was a religion of peace.” 9. Republicans go after one of their own – When David Ramadan, a longtime Republican Party activist and protege of Grover Norquist, ran for a seat in the Virginia House of Delegates in 2011, the Islamophobia network sprang into action. Norquist, of course, is a secret Muslim Brotherhood agent according to these people, so his actual Muslim bud must be worse. Pam Geller called him an “Islamic supremacist,” David Horowitz warned Virginia Republicans not to “lie down in the camel’s bed,” and Frank Gaffney accused him of having ties to Hezbollah. There were nasty ads and exchanges at town halls, but Ramadan won the GOP primary and eventually a seat in the House of Delegates. 8. And again, but this time they call him a “terrorist” – The Islamophobia trickles down all the way to the local level, we found, in the case of Nezar Hamze, a Republican from Florida who tried to join the Broward County Republican Executive Committee but got turned down by a vote of 158 to 11. He met all the requirements, but people in his own party distributed pamphlets labeling him a “terrorist.” The basis? Hamze is head of the local chapter of CAIR. 7. Obama the closeted Muslim – Plenty of people have suggested that President Obama is a secret Muslim this cycle, but California Republican congressional candidate Sam Aanestad wins the award for his remarkable forthrightness: “I was asked, do I think [Obama]‘s a Muslim, and the answer is yes, that is his background. That is his beginning. Is he a Christian today? There’s no way that you or I can tell that. But his background, his upbringing, his tradition, his holiday observances all come from a Muslim background.” 6. Even worse than Allen West – After Allen West fled his old district after redistricting, the good people of Florida’s 22nd got a new Islamophobe to kick around: Adam Hasner, the former Florida House majority leader. The Republican is a close personal friend of anti-Islam bloggers Pamela Geller and Robert Spencer, has invited notoriously anti-Muslim Dutch Parliamentarian Geert Wilders to speak in Florida, and once skipped the Florida Legislature’s opening prayers because they were being delivered by an imam. When Salon highlighted his Islamophobic record in August, Geller said it was only a matter of time before we were “getting measured for a suicide vest.” 5. A real-life Muslim in Congress! – Democratic Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison was the first Muslim elected to Congress, so he’s used to it, but his Republican opponent, Chris Fields, accused him this year in a mailer of being “militantly anti-America.” That’s nothing compared to how Fields’ GOP primary opponent came right out and called him a “radical Islamist” in the statement announcing her candidacy for his seat. In fact, Ellison’s religion was her primary motivation for running. 4. A real-life Muslim in Congress! Part 2 —Democratic Rep. Andre Carson of Indiana was the second Muslim elected to Congress and has so far attracted less hate than Ellison, but when he was praising the innovative ways parochial schools remain relevant, including Muslim schools, it caused a grade-A right-wing freakout, complete with hyperventilating from Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh about how Carson wanted to force students to learn the Quran. One assumes that if Carson had praised St. Mary’s Junior High School instead of a madrassa, no one would have batted an eyelash. 3. Islamophobia-off 2012 – Rep. Diane Black managed to beat out Lou Ann Zelenik in the Republican primary in Tennessee thatbasically came down to an Islamophobia-off. The debate mostly centered around the planned mosque in Murfreesboro, which has become a lightning rod for anti-Muslim sentiment in the area and across the country. In fighting the mosque, Black charged that communities need to protect themselves from the “jihadist viewpoint.” But Zelenik, the executive director of the reliably Islamophobic Tennessee Freedom Coalition, thought Black’s stance didn’t go far enough, firing back: “I will work to stop the Islamization of our society, and do everything possible to prevent Shariah law from circumventing our laws and our Constitution.” 2. Joe Walsh (probably) causes a hate crime – Rep. Joe Walsh, the Tea Party darling poised to lose his seat in November, warned in August that “a radical strain of Islam in this country … trying to kill Americans every week.” “It’s here. It’s in Elk Grove. It’s in Addison. It’s in Elgin. It’s here,” he added. Hours later, a manshot at a mosque in the district, narrowly missing a security guard outside as 500 people prayed inside. 1. Michele Bachmann’s witch hunt – Then there’s the Tea Party queen herself, Minnesota Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann. Bachmann is facing a tighter-than-expected race against Democratic hotel magnate Jim Graves, and she has possibly even outdone herself this cycle with allegations that Huma Abedin, a senior aide to Hillary Clinton, is tied to Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and potentially part of a conspiracy to influence U.S. policy through her position. Bachmann also used a speech at theValues Voters conference to fear-monger about President Obama’s policy in the Middle East: “The fact is this administration is virtually outlawed understanding who the enemy is and at every turn the enemy the president is persistent on apologizing for who we are as Americans,” she said. Jillian Rayfield is an Assistant News Editor for Salon, focusing on politics. Follow her on Twitter at @jillrayfield or email her at jrayfield@salon.com.MORE JILLIAN RAYFIELD. http://www.loonwatch.com/2012/10/the-10-most-islamophobic-moments-in-the-2012-elections/
  21. To all Muslims and open-minded people able to Vote in the United States: Be sure to not vote for those who publicly attack Islam! Even if you don’t normally vote, at least vote for an opposing party which does not attack Islam and has ideal views on politics so that these ignorant and hateful politicians do not win! Many of them speak about Shariah Law like they know about it. I don’t know a single Muslim who wanted Shariah Law in the United States. Why would we want Islamic Law in a country where Muslims aren’t the majority? We are happy with our Shariah Law back in the Middle East and Islamic countries, and here in the U.S.A. we are happy with our Constitution which allows us freedom of religion and yet Islam is widely attacked by the politicians themselves. Here are 13 politicians who attack Islam, though their are dozens and dozens more. Avoid These Politicians Who Attack Islam: 1. Gabriela Mercer (Arizona): “That includes Chinese, Middle Easterners,” she said. “If you know Middle Easterners, a lot of them, they look Mexican or they look, you know, like a lot of people in South America, dark skin, dark hair, brown eyes. And they mix. They mix in. “And those people, their only goal in life is to, to cause harm to the United States. So why do we want them here, either legally or illegally? When they come across the border, besides the trash that they leave behind, the drug smuggling, the killings, the beheadings. I mean, you are seeing stuff. It’s a war out there.”2. Herman Cain: “This is just another way to try to gradually sneak Sharia law into our laws, and I absolutely object to that” and also said he would not allow a Muslim to work in his cabinet because of “creeping Shariah law.”3. Newt Gingrich: “…But in fact they’re both engaged in jihad, and they’re both seeking to impose the same end state, which is to replace Western civilization with a radical imposition of Shariah.”4. Michele Bachmann (Minnesota Rep.): “It is my duty as a member of Congress to ask why the Obama administration has repeatedly undermined America’s national security and bows to political correctness on issues related to radical Islam.”5. Eric Cantor (Virginia Rep.): Supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.6. John R. Bolton: Also supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.7. Trent Franks (Arizona Rep.): Also supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.8. Louie Gohmert (Texas Rep.): Also supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.9. Thomas Rooney (Florida Rep.): Also supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.10. Lynn Westmoreland (Georgia Rep.): Also supports Michele Bachmann’s Muslim witch hunt.11. Joe Walsh (Illinois Rep.): “One thing I’m sure of is that there are people in this country – there is a radical strain of Islam in this country – it’s not just over there – trying to kill Americans every week. It is a real threat, and it is a threat that is much more at home now than it was after 9/11,” AND: “If we want peace in the Middle East, we have to publicly choose a side and defend that side. We have to stand with Israel. We must be their advisor and protector. We must make clear that there will be no talks and no negotiations until the other side acknowledges Israel’s right to exist, stops spewing anti-Israel hatred among its youth, and stops any and all terrorist activity. If the Palestinians take these steps, we can begin negotiations. If they don’t, the Palestinians will face the combined wrath of Israel and the United States. That can be the only basis for lasting peace. The other side will only give up its vow to destroy Israel and commit to lasting peace if they understand and fear our strength. As a freshman Congressman, I am pro-Israel first and pro-peace second. True peace in the Middle East will only come when that is our nation’s stated policy and not the other way around. Most U.S. presidents have followed the old paradigm and tried to be an honest broker between the two sides. President Obama seems only to pay lip service to even that role, and clearly his sympathies lie with the Palestinians. He is not capable of achieving peace in the Middle East because he is not pro-Israel.”12. Rick Santorum: “I get a kick out of folks who call for equality now, the people on the left, ‘Well, equality, we want equality.’ Where do you think this concept of equality comes from?” Santorum asked the enthusiastic crowd packed into a restaurant here. “It doesn’t come from Islam. It doesn’t come from the East and Eastern religions, where does it come from? It comes from the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, that’s where it comes from.”13. Peter T. King (New York Rep.): … “This coordinated and ongoing recruitment and radicalization of young Muslim men in the U.S. is a serious and growing threat to our homeland security and simply cannot be ignored.”
  22. Muslim Terrorism

    Islamophobic nutcases argue that 'Islamic terrorism' is the single biggest threat to Western countries. Yet according to Europol data, Islamist terrorist attacks accounted for only 0.4% of the attacks in Europe between 2006 and 2008. Most terrorist attacks were carried out by separatist and Left-Wing groups. For example, this is the table of attacks for 2008: More here: http://www.loonwatch...rism-in-europe/ What's more, according to data from the FBI's official website, Islamist terrorist attacks accounted for only 6% of attacks in the US between 1980 and 2005, although the percentage of victims was greater because of 9/11. Jewish extremists accounted for 7% of terrorist attacks! More here: http://www.loonwatch...ts-are-muslims/ LoonWatch is an awesome site - I recommend it
  23. Halal and Kosher hit by Dutch ban Next month the Dutch parliament is expected to approve a ban on halal and kosher methods of slaughtering animals for food. Those who proposed the ban say it is simply an issue of animal welfare, but it received strong support from the right-wing Freedom Party. Many see it as a violation of their religious freedom, and among the Jewish community it is a worrying echo of a similar ban brought in by Hitler. Anna Holligan reports from The Hague. Watch Video here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-15610142
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