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Found 107 results

  1. Salam everyone, I came across this article on al-Islam.org. https://www.al-islam.org/hijab-muslim-womens-dress-islamic-or-cultural-sayyid-muhammad-rizvi/hijab-jokes i thought I must share it with all of you, it’s good - to the point and funny- and are not my words. Some sister wrote it many years ago. let me know what you guys think of this little article, as I plan to make a video on this - so your response will help! Here it is: ’It has been my personal observation that some Muslim girls and women do not realize the significance of hijab. Hijab is Arabic for protection and cover. Some people put a lot of effort into their hijab, yet it serves no purpose. I am referring to the pointless hijab that some girls wear. The first pointless hijab is referred to as the headband hijab. It is a band of fabric approximately 4 inches wide. It covers the back of the head and allows all the hair to be exposed. It doesn't serve much in terms of modesty, but at least it comes in handy in case of an unexpected tennis match. The second pointless hijab is the dupetta, also known as the Saran wrap hijab. It covers all the hair, but it is totally transparent. Again it doesn't serve much in terms of modesty, but it keeps the hair nice and fresh. The third type of hijab is known as the Mickey Mouse Hijab. It is when a girl wears a black scarf and tucks it behind her ear, so that her ears stick out. We now move to my favorites: the yo-yo hijabs.The first yo-yo hijab, also known as the Benazir Bhutto hijab, is the scarf that keeps falling down and needs to be constantly pulled back up....up, down, up, down, just like a yo-yo. The second yo-yo hijab is also referred to as the convertible hijab. This type of hijab is predominant at any type of social event, i.e. an Aqeeqah, Bismillah party, Ameen party, wedding, etc. This is when an Imam or Qari comes up to the microphone and starts to recite Qur'an. At this point, all the convertible hijabs come up...until he says "Sadaqallahul adheem". I'm not sure, but apparently in some cultures that translates to "Ok sisters, you may now take off your scarves". I'm sure this may seem odd, but what's even funnier is when people do not anticipate the recitation of Qur'an at a social event, and are forced to be creative and use accessories such as a purse to cover one's hair. I was surprised to see a women hold her purse over her head as "hijab"...as if the multitudes of men surrounding her are not a good enough reason to wear hijab, but some guy reciting du'a compels her to hold a purse over her head. Her friends were more creative...one friend used her dinner napkin. I was also laughing when I saw the communal hijab---two or more girls draped under one dinner napkin during the recitation of Qur'an. Her other friend was still more creative. She used her coffee saucer on the back of her head. I wasn't sure if it was hijab or a Yamaka. I didn't know if she was a Muslim or a Jew. I felt like going up to her and saying "Shalom alaikum, sister". And, people should remember that hijab is not just a protection from guys, but from a girl's nafs (ego) as well. It should prevent girls from having to spend hours in front of the mirror doing their hair. But, unfortunately, you see girls in front of the mirror for hours doing their hijab as they would do their hair, with all sorts of elaborate braids and the like. I wanted to go up to a sister and say "Is your hijab naturally curly?" I also felt compelled to go up to another girl and say "pardon me, but is your hijab naturally that color, or did you dye it?" Well, the point to remember is that some people make an effort to wear hijab, but it is futile, because it is not fulfilling its purpose. It's like using an umbrella with holes in it. Hijab is used for protection from guys as well as from the girl herself, and should not be used as an accessory or for beautifying one's self. Anyway, that's it…. dont forget to write your response!
  2. Salam aleykum, Funny how they ask a fashion blogger regarding the nuclear program of another country to begin with.
  3. zara.feda

    Hijab!

    Assalamualaikum, before moving to Japan life was much easier. Sports, sports club, changing clothes, physical education had become so hard for me that I started to hate my religion because my parents or let's say my mother did not allowed me to get rid of my hijab , she told me either school or hijab and I chose school because school is mandatory until 9th grade but I told her that I will leave school if u don't allowed me. I swear life over here is hard. My question is that do I go to school until 9th grade and wear hijab 「 I am in 9th and next year around February, I will graduate」 or don't wear hijab and go to school?
  4. okay so I really don't know how to start all of this... I am a 19 year old girl, started wearing a hijab when I turned 13 years old - Me, still super young, didn't have any idea what was happening, somehow got forced into wearing it because everyone scared me. or let me just say, there was no other option. Turning 15, I told my parents that I didn't want to wear it anymore. They got extremely mad, my mom cried her heart out, it was like seeing them have a mental breakdown. I got really scared so I kept wearing it. Turning 18 and starting uni, which also made me live in a different country, I decided to just tell them that I'm taking it off and did it. The problem here is, that I can't bear seeing my mom cry... And I can't talk to her either about this topic.. Born and raised in Europe, which zero arabic friends, makes it way too hard for me to actually wer hijab with everyone around you judging and treating in such a different way... She just doesn't get it. I really don't know what to do in that kind of situation... I really don't want to force myself to do something I'm super uncomfortable with but I don't want to see my mom cry and know that she's sad. It just breaks my heart and makes me cry myself into sleep.. I'm really clueless.. I just found that forum because I can't talk to anyone about this. Does anyone maybe have an idea what I could do right now?.. Am I just "forced" to wear it? is there no other way out?
  5. https://www.albawaba.com/entertainment/amal-hijazi-just-retired-because-she-wore-a-hijab-1017926 https://arabic.cnn.com/entertainment/2017/09/05/lebanon-amal-hijazi-hijab Lebanese singer Amal Hijazi surprised fans today by announcing she’d be retiring from life on stage. More importantly, depending on your perspective, she announced this following pictures of her wearing a hijab making their way around social media. It’s true, said Amal Hijazi in a Facebook post. I’m a hijabi now. And I am therefore retiring from the stage. “God has finally answered my prayers…for years I have struggled with the art I loved and the closeness to the religion I have harboured. I’ve lived this struggle internally and God, finally, has answered my prayers.” https://www.facebook.com/amalhijazipage/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peVPnNPFNps “I don’t mean to diminish the art or other artists…but I have found happiness.”
  6. So I hear this argument a lot as a guy searching for a practicing Shia spouse: "Oh don't be so strict on the hijab, she can always wear it after." or here's a better one: "What? You don't think you have enough faith to bring her closer to Islam." (paraphrasing) and of course my favorite: "Oh well just because this girl does Hijab now doesn't mean she'll do it forever. She might wear the hijab but wear tight jeans and do lots of make up." (I call this the hijabi fashionista argument which is valid to a point). So my question is: am I crazy to have something as simple, basic and WAJIB (key here) as hijab as one of my requirements for marriage? I mean if I'm looking for a practicing Muslim (isn't that by definition someone who does Hijab)? I feel if you have enough sense to wear Hijab you must have some sense about the basics of Islam. You may not be necessarily be religious but at least there is a visible potential there (and yes I know the whole "don't judge a book by a cover" but I think it applies here). I mean at the end of the day if Hijab doesn't matter, let me just go and find the most attractive looking girl and "charm her" into wearing hijab (sarcasm). I'm going insane.
  7. Alhamdulilah, I was granted an opportunity to study in the West (in Canada specifically) and it will be the first time I will be on my own for an extended period. So I have been reading up on the region I will be staying in,especially on how Muslims are treated there and if there is any xenophobia or islamophobia(I will be a visible minority since I wear a hijab and I found myself falling down in the rabbit hole and reading horror stories on violent attacks, murders,assaults and prejudice in the street and in the work environment. This search was not limited to my future area but encompassed almost every western country. From my uneducated opinion based on reading articles on the incidents I found three major types of incidents: The first is when a crazy psychopathic terrorist attacks a mosque or a gathering of Muslims (yes I decided to label them terrorists because for me a terrorist is someone who wants to kill you and torture you and justifies and rationalizes it by whatever "code" or "reason" he follows). I noticed in almost every case that that was the last straw in a long line of verbal and minor (compared to a mass shooting) attacks on the same community. For example a week before the attack on the Canadian mosque the same terrorist left a pig's head and blood on their doorstep. Think about it, violence is a process especially extreme violence. It does not start from nowhere. Its build up bit by bit. It starts by racist and islamophobic posts on social media (In every incident I read about the terrorist was quite open and unapologetic about his islamophobic views on social media )which are encouraged by the media and his own community. And then the next time he meets an identifiable acceptable target i.e most likely a woman wearing a hijab he will permit himself more leeway and overstep his bounds. Which brings us to the second type of incident :Where the terrorist knows an "identifiable acceptable target"/potential victim in his daily life. For example a neighbor or a colleague at work.The gradual attacks are even more evident in these cases since before the most likely lethal final outcome there will be an almost constant harassment and bullying. And then I found the third type of incident :where the victim doesn't know the perpetrator and is blindsided by the attack. According to one article and my own humble opinion (I resorted to articles because I havent found a survey or statistics on the attack's pattern from the muslim community) the attacker is most likely but not always a young adult white male and the victim is a young woman wearing a hijab.Also the attacks most likely happens in a fringe zone i.e a place of transit like a public transportation station or a parking space or a less frequented side street. As for the time I am sure there is a direct correlation between a surge of attacks on Muslims of the west and terrorist attacks by daesh in the west. Now logically speaking I realize I was being a little paranoid and that there wasn't a witch hunt going on unbeknownst to the rest of the Muslim world but there must be a basis of truth in this phenomenon. If so dear Muslims of the west if you would be so kind to answer my questions (also any feedback and criticism is welcome as I said this is my uneducated humble opinion) Jazekha Allah: -How does it affect you in your daily life ? Are you being prejudiced against in your work environment (especially if you wear a hijab)? Is the issue being addressed in the shia community of the west ? Have they found out a way to teach you on how to disengage or even better how to avoid and prevent it from happening as in schooling you on how to be vigilant and the telltale signs and the ideal situation for attacks to happen? Is there something specific for our kid's safety ? Is there a legal framework by Muslims and for Muslims to deal with prejudice and the aftermath of attacks ? Also Do you have any advice for someone in my situation and any feedback is welcome. Rahmatou Allah for all those who lost their lives in these incidents and I do believe we should honor them by working toward preventing them.
  8. Salam, I am fairly new to Islam. I wear a hijab but not in the traditional way, because I love fashion and tend to experiment with new styles while still being modest. The bottom tips of my ears are usually exposed (I do not know if this is allowed) but I try to pull down my hats and scarves as much as I can to cover them. Am I allowed to wear modest earrings? Or would that be considered inappropriate in Islam? And if this would be wrong, then how about if my ears are covered while wearing a traditional hijab such as a shawl, but the earrings hang out of my scarf? I once hear from somebody that women can wear necklaces and bracelets as long as it is on top of clothing and not on skin. Is this true for earrings too? Thank you
  9. Can i give my picture without hijab to a man whose intention is to marry me? What should i do if i find out that his family is anti hijab and their intention is to take off my hijab after marriage? I dont know this guy personally.
  10. I need help, I have a best friend who has gone through a lot in her life has had major surgery from a young age and is beginning to crumble, things aren't going well and shes giving up, shes loosing the want for god and feels like hes put too much for her and she feels the only way to find happiness is when she gets pleasure from a guy , not sex though. I tried to tell her all her troubles are a test and she will leave this world without them, I tell her to turn to Allah but shes obviously hurt and lost hope, she said she was perfect as a child but the had major health issues and her life went crumbling down after that through family, friends, money, education. this is heaps deeper but you cant explain 6 years in one paragraph, any advise on what I can tell her to get her back on the right track.
  11. Australian Senator Wears Burqa in Parliament to Push for Ban By JACQUELINE WILLIAMSAUG. 17, 2017 Photo Senator Pauline Hanson wore a burqa in the Senate at Parliament House in Canberra, the capital, on Thursday. She said that she wanted to draw attention to her party’s push to ban full-face coverings in public.CreditEuropean Pressphoto Agency SYDNEY, Australia — Australia’s Senate is rowdy and raucous, and often compared to a schoolyard. But after the leader of the anti-immigrant One Nation party walked into the chamber on Thursday wearing a burqa, the room went silent. Then came the stunned responses: “oh” and “what on earth.” The party leader, Pauline Hanson, took her seat as political rivals watched astounded. Senators from her party laughed. Removing the garment, Ms. Hanson, who is not Muslim, said that the burqa, a full-body and face covering, should be banned in Australia. She said that she wore the veil to draw attention to her party’s push to ban full-face coverings in public. “I’m quite happy to remove this because this is not what should belong in this Parliament,” she said as the Senate met during parliamentary sitting week, in which lawmakers debate legislation and other matters. Photo Ms. Hanson. CreditReuters In a speech in the chamber last year, Ms. Hanson said that Australia was “in danger of being swamped by Muslims.” A recent report from the Trump administration referred to Ms. Hanson in listing her party as a threat to religious freedom. Critics say that Ms. Hanson, who represents Queensland, seeks to make Australia a country where only English is spoken and where non-Christian religions are invisible. Ms. Hanson said in a statement that she wore the burqa because she thought that banning full-face coverings in public “was an important issue facing modern Australia that needed to be discussed.” Such coverings, she said, were “oppressive, presented barriers to assimilation, disadvantaged women from finding employment” and “had no place in modern Western society.” Ms. Hanson’s actions drew strong criticism in the Senate. Attorney General George Brandis, a member of the conservative Liberal Party, denounced the move in an emotional speech in which his voice broke. He said that Australia would not ban burqas. “To ridicule that community, to drive it into a corner, to mock its religious garments is an appalling thing to do, and I would ask you to reflect on what you have done,” he said, referring to Muslims. Photo Senators applauding after Attorney General George Brandis, not pictured, criticized Ms. Hanson for wearing a burqa. CreditLukas Coch/European Pressphoto Agency His response elicited a standing ovation from one side of the floor. “I would caution and counsel you with respect to be very, very careful of the offense you may do to the religious sensibilities of other Australians,” he said. Mr. Brandis said that about half a million people practice Islam in Australia, the vast majority of whom are law-abiding “good Australians.” Ms. Hanson used her speech on Thursday to address terrorism. She said that the police had uncovered 13 significant threats since Australia raised its terrorist threat level to probable in 2014, calling terrorism “a true threat to our country” and saying that “many Australians are very much in fear of it.” Clive Bean, a political-science professor at Queensland University of Technology, said he “was not aware of a stunt quite like this happening in Parliament before.” He said that he was surprised that the president of the Senate, Stephen Parry, let it occur. “The danger of such a strong stunt as that is that it has the opposite of the desired effect,” he said. “The fallout is stronger against than in favor.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/world/australia/pauline-hanson-burqa-australia-senate.html
  12. CarbonylCarbon

    The Hijab

    Hey Guys, So this topic is regarding the hijab of the women. Let me start by saying that over the past two years I have been going back and forth about Islam. I was on the fence most of the time. I feel that a lot of people will become hostile and lose track when it comes to someone questioning your believes. This is not a progressive way to have a healthy debate. All I ask for I logic and reasoning. So let's dive in. I personally don't think a women needs to wear or cover herself the way it is traditionally done. Let me explain, in the Qur'an it mentions the hijab of the man (lower the gaze) before the hijab of the women. What I fail to understand is why the burden is on the women to wear it and not on the man to, excuse my French, calm his boner? Why is the women responsible for his wrongdoings? I have asked the local scholar at my mosque about this and I get the two age old arguments of the candy wrapper and the pot of gold. The first being, two candies one wrapped and the other isn't are dropped on the floor. Which would you eat? I'm sorry, but you cannot simply a women to being a mere candy and calling her "dirty" because she isn't wearing a hijab unfounded. A women is more than a candy. The latter argument is the pot of gold. If you put it outside and don't cover it, someone will steal it so it's best to cover it. Again you're being an idiot for putting the gold out there in the first place. And women aren't a lifeless pot of gold, this metaphore is also unfounded. The crux of the situation, if you look at it from the outside, is that the women wears a veil to protect herself from a man's desires. Rather the burden is on her to cover herself. It's like telling everyone to wear bulletproof vests because some people own guns. The person owning the gun is responsible for his actions and not the people around. The people around him can't be held accountable for his actions. I've lived in the west all my life, and can see that around me in a social and professional environment men and women work and live together in a normal manner. Regardless of what they are wearing. The society here I'm the weather has learned and progressed beyond the thinking that a women ankle is a turn on. Rather the focus is progressive with regards to what one can wear. I am still Muslim, and I still believe, and I still pray and read quran. However my believe has changed and has become more realistic, more logical and rational in my mind. The veil is one of the things that I don't agree with. A women can wear it if she seems it necessary, but I see it as a guideline. I would like to hear what you have to say about this, and by all means be logical and rational about this. I don't subscribe to the notion that a Maraji said x,y or z. There are so many cases I can give you for their ruling being so outrageous that logical and rational seems to the last thing they think about. Any takers?
  13. When the eastern boogeyman called Osama bin Laden, Taliban, Al-Qaeda, ISIL, ISIS, Iran wears thin and loses credibility in the eyes of the average person in the West, we get these desperate garbage attempts to regurgitate and refresh the negativity surrounding the subject. Here we go again... 'We won't wear hijabs': Chess queens threaten to boycott world championships in Iran after being told they MUST wear Islamic headscarfs There's even a Reddit thread which had around 9000+ upvotes yesterday, but is going down rapidly. WARNING: If you wish to avoid cancerous comments regarding Muslims, Iran and its citizens, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT visit the comment section of either the article or the Reddit thread.
  14. Hello! I wonder if darker or more grayer clothes are more modest than white or light colored clothes. I have always worn dark and grayer clothes when I'm outside, but my mother insists on me that I should wear more light colored clothes, for example like beige and white. The thing is that I don't feel confident wearing them because it adorns me, considering that a muslim woman should not display her adornments. Actually, I think lighter colored clothes can make anyone more appealing in contrast to someone wearing darker clothes. So my question is is it more modest for a muslim woman to wear darker and grayer clothes than light colored clothes?(take into account that the woman doesn't wear makeup!) Thank you!
  15. Asalamalekum, I am having anxieties that someone will harm my wife. If she goes out of the house wearing hijab, because of the current political situation. I want my wife to do proper hijab, but at the same time i fear for her safety. I read all the time muslims specially "womans" who wear hijabs being attacked and discriminated in America. What should i do in this situation? do you feel the same way about your loved ones, when they go out wearing hijab? W.salam
  16. Really good interview. https://video-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hvideo-xpl1/v/t42.1790-2/12508263_778243395641746_1444279334_n.mp4?efg=eyJybHIiOjY0OSwicmxhIjo0MDk2LCJ2ZW5jb2RlX3RhZyI6InYzXzQyNl9jcmZfMjNfbWFpbl8zLjBfc2QifQ%3D%3D&rl=649&vabr=361&oh=36bb1836acbade6ee5e5d18c81937ca9&oe=56A586E6 Hijab privatises a woman's sexuality Saying Hijab is oppression, is tantamount to saying that a women is only powerful if she is sexy in public
  17. @Sara345 Hello, I'm doing a school project on why Muslim women wear hijab, I would greatly appreciate it if you could answer the following questions: 1) What's your first name? What country are you from? 2) Why do you wear Hijab? 3) Do you wear it to be more modest? Thanks so much!
  18. sharif110

    Compulsion to wear Hijab

    Is a Muslim man allowed to force his wife to wear hijab? Alsalamu Alaikum According to Islamic jurisprudence, Man is not allowed to force his wife to wear hijab but can prevent her from going out of house although she has worn hijab. Therefore he can bet that if she wears hijab, she is allowed to go out. Although a man is not permitted to force his wife to wear hijab, but what a nice tradition, that shall be regarded and noticed, is reported from Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (a.s) to have said: فَإِنَّ شِدَّةَ الْحِجَابِ أَبْقَى عَلَیْهِنَّ In this tradition, Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (a.s) says a kind of recommendation concerning to the way of behaving with wife and women. Imam (a.s) says, "Severity in Hijab more maintain their chastity."
  19. Sara1996

    Wrists - hijab

    Salam guys i have a question about covering the wrists. Pretty much every Shia marja says cover the hands up to the wrists. Does this mean cover the wrists too? It might seem like 'whys she being so fussy about not wanting to cover her wrists' but trust me it is sooo annoying trying to keep them covered. I can only achieve this by wearing sleeves that are too long or wearing sleeves that are tight from the bottom end which defeats the purpose. If I wear sleeves that are my normal length I have to keep tugging at the bottom ALL the time - to put on my bag, to write, to eat etc etc otherwise when my sleeves go up you can see the wrists. It's really annoying to cover them. So that's why I'm asking... jzk sara
  20. As salaamu alaykum - Dear Sisters: I'm looking at creating neighborhood or regional hijabi safety groups for sisters to more safely go out in public for shopping and other errands. The past year during campaigning and especially post-elections, there has been a marked increase in intolerance and hate crimes particularly against visible Muslims, which are mostly women who wear hijab (scarf, head-covering, noticeably modest clothing). Depending on one's region or neighborhood, this may include risk of annoyance, shunning, hostility, verbal insults, aggressive behavior, bullying to physical danger. In most verbal or physical incidents, a single hijabi is targeted by a male or a group of males. It has been directed toward anyone wearing hijab regardless of race, national origin, ethnic/cultural heritage, and due to ignorance has also included modest and visibly religious of other faiths. This has caused fear and anxiety and has prevented many hijabi sisters from going about their normal routine in public. I was deeply upset by several incidents directed at me at regional stores, places I'd frequented previously without incident. I now only go out in the company of my husband, mother, or both. Although there is a present Muslim community (Shi'a and Sunni of many backgrounds, origins) of several hundred, in the past month, I have only seen one other hijabi in public while shopping and running errands. This saddens me. I don't believe we should have to live in fear or hide in our homes or work because of what might happen outside. Rather than bring up what upsetting incidents are happening, politics, or seeking more proof of ignorance and intolerance, I'm interested in creating neighborhood or regional hijabi safety groups to safely go out in public. Most incidents involve an individual hijabi traveling, walking, shopping, etc. A group of three or more women in public are a much less attractive target to bullies or haters. I'm the only hijabi in our neighborhood, however, I'm reaching out to others in neighboring counties (and asking them to reach out to those who may live in our region) to create little groups who would be interested in going places together for errands and shopping and to be a support system for each other. If someone needed to go to the library or post office or grocery store, one would contact the others to see who also needs to go or would like to accompany as a sister-buddy system. One would go to pick up the others and go together on their errands. Is anyone else doing this, and if so, how is that working? Any suggestions on creating public support systems and making it successful? Thanks in advance, and may Allah reward you for your intentions!
  21. ScienceCat

    Prayer clothing?

    If I wear a very long Hijab (I think its called Jilbab? Example here, Do I have to wear clean clothing underneath as well? (e.g. new pyjama's) Because I go to the bathroom in my pyjama's, can I wear something on top of them to pray in?
  22. Salaam! I am a convert of 3 years (Alhumdililah) and am almost done my second week of wearing hijab☺️☺️ However... I am of European decent (one that doesn't have many Muslims) so my family does not know how to take it. SubhanAllah, My grandparents have officially stopped speaking to me and my mother was weird for a few days. I did kind of spring it up out of nowhere with no warning but it wasn't planned like that. I felt like I kept getting signs and that I had to wear it ASAP(a lot more in depth than you may think) . Anyways my mother told me she hates to see me in it and asked me why I wear it because she says she knows many Muslim women who don't wear it and was frustrated that I decided to wear it; Due to her anger and frustration I felt it was not the right time to try and explain because no matter what I would say, she would have a hard time comprehending than if she were calm..(keep in mind my mother does NOT believed God..) So how can you explain your relationship with God with someone who doesn't believe he exists? My mom thinks I have gone crazy and am an extremist or something because I'm wearing a hijab, which is silly because I am still the same person, just covered! I would like to sit her down when she's calm (InshaAllah) and give her solid concrete proof from the Quran as well as explain it a little more in depth with her, then give her my reasoning for wearing hijab. However I feel no matter what I say she will try to justify that hijab is not the answer; however in my heart I know it is... HELP
  23. Hijab is a general rule for every person. Nobody is allowed to appear naked in the public. The difference between Muslims and non-Muslims in hijab issue is just the limitation of covering. A Christian woman observes some type of covering when she walks in the street, but it is not absolutely a perfect covering. We should note that hijab is not just an Islamic command. Jews and Christians have hijab. Look at the pictures below: The interesting point is that even western women about 100 years ago observed hijab. So, why a Muslim girl should not wear hijab? More information: The Leader's View of Hijab influence of hijab on the west
  24. It is worth mentioning the opinion of Iran’s Supreme Leader about this issue: Source: The Leader's View of Hijab
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