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Found 75 results

  1. There is a common practice amongst Muslims to fast on the 10th of Muharram (1 month of the Islamic calendar). Although there are several hadith in support of this act, they can be summarized using the 2 primary hadiths below: “When Allah's Apostle arrived at Medina, he found the Jews observing the fast on the day of 'ashura' (10th of Muharram). The Prophet asked them (about it) and they replied, "This is the day when Moses became victorious over Pharaoh." The Prophet said (to the Muslims), "We are nearer to Moses than they, so fast on this day." Volume 3, Book 31, Number 222: Narrated by Ibn 'Abbas Volume 4, Book 55, Number 609: Narrated by Ibn 'Abbas Volume 5, Book 58, Number 279: Narrated by Ibn 'Abbas Volume 6, Book 60, Number 202: Narrated by Ibn 'Abbas Volume 6, Book 60, Number 261: Narrated by Ibn 'Abbas Sahih Bukhari “During the Pre-lslamic Period of ignorance the Quraish used to observe fasting on the day of 'ashura', and the Prophet himself used to observe fasting on it too. But when he came to Medina, he fasted on that day and ordered the Muslims to fast on it. When (the order of compulsory fasting in ) Ramadan was revealed, fasting in Ramadan became an obligation, and fasting on 'ashura' was given up, and who ever wished to fast (on it) did so, and whoever did not wish to fast on it, did not fast.” Volume 6, Book 60, Number 31: Narrated by Aisha Volume 3, Book 31, Number 117: Narrated by 'Aisha (similar to above hadith) Volume 3, Book 31, Number 220: Narrated by Aisha (similar to above hadith) Volume 5, Book 58, Number 172: Narrated by 'Aisha (similar to above hadith) Sahih Bukhari Let’s investigate the first hadith – fasting in observance Moses victory. In Judaism, this event is known as Passover. The eight-day festival of Passover is celebrated in from the 15th through the 22nd of the Hebrew month of Nissan. The Jews of Medina also followed this calendar and not the Arab calendar. Authentic hadith tell us that the Prophet (saw) migrated from Mecca to Medina at the end of Safar so his first Ashura in Medina was in AH2. Based on on-line date conversion software (+- 1-2 days): 10 Muharram AH2 (Islamic date) = 14 July 623AD (Gregorian date) = 8th of Av, 4383 (Jewish date) Since the month of AV is the fifth month of the Hebrew calendar, it is highly unlikely the Jews were fasting in observance of Passover on the 10th of Muharram since the dates were nowhere close to each other. Now for the 2nd hadith – continuing the custom of Qurayish by fasting on 10th Muharram The Prophet (saw) spent 23 years of his preaching Islam and abrogating the customs of the kuffar of Mecca yet he continued this custom even after hijra? Highly unlikely! Even if the above traditions are taken to be true, why only celebrate one Jewish custom out of thousands of them? Also, if the Prophet (saw) celebrated their joyous occasions, did he observe and show sorrow during their sad or calamitous days? Why not observe the Sabbath or celebrate the birthday of UZA? The entire Muslim community has a choice: either celebrate Ashura by fasting and celebrating in allegiance to the Jews of Medina and Kuffar of Mecca or observe the calamity that befell the progeny of the Prophet (saw) in a solemn and somber manner. BTW, one of the options makes you a munafiq (hint: loving the Prophet but ignoring the calamity of his progeny)
  2. Aslamualaikum, i have a query regarding fasting in the month of shawwal for 6 days as they hold great fazila'h in ahl-e-sunnah's mazhab, what i want to know is that is there any mention / hadith of shawwal fasting in shia mazhab as well ? JazakALLAH khair
  3. Fasting outside Ramadan

    Salam brothers and sisters, I have decided to fast outside the month of Ramadan following a series of makruh acts that have been bothering me before this month. I feel if i exercise control in any way possible i will comply. My question is, what day is it forbidden to fast. there is a thread i have read that explains when it is best to fast but there should be no harm to fast on non special occasions. And outside fasting, any other tips on self control is highly appreciated! May Allah Bless Mohammed(PBUH) and his family. Many thanks.
  4. Is Naswaar allowed?

    Is Naswaar allowed during fasting?
  5. Too tired to Fast

    Salam. The problem is, I find it very difficult to fast. It's very hot in the city that I reside in in Pakistan, and fasting leaves me with really no energy. Add to that the fact that I'm under-weight and you can imagine how difficult it has become for me. Even though I'm on vacations, I've been unable to do anything productive except laying around until late afternoon doing nothing. This is taking a toll on my life. Can I skip fast(s) to help with this? I'm not medically sick - no nausea or drowsiness, just feel tired and totally drained of energy to the point of uselessness.
  6. Roza for 5 days at my Home

    I have a simple question. I am away from my home ( in different) state working in company. I am going home for 5 days (which although is 1000kms away). Do I need to keep fast for these 5 days at home or not? (Since I have heard that coming back to home you have to keep fast). Please confirm it and let me know.
  7. State of Janaba

    Salem aleykum brothers and sisters, Please bear with me as I have afew things to get through. Discussing this topic is quite intimidating and embarrassing, hence why I haven't managed to pluck up the courage to seek out help and knowledge untill now. And I would like it if you were a little considerate with your answers please, Thank you. So, my topic is Janaba from masturbation. It all started around a year ago when I first started this bad habit, it was out of curiosity initially but eventually became an addiction. At that time of the year I was in a very depressed state, often thinking about suicide ( for no particular reason.) The urge was strong but I never went ahead with it because I did not want to think that I have become hopeless of my creator. I was aware that suicide was haram and it is irreversible. So, i would often just try and find ways to feel better to get rid of those thoughts. and I guess that's where the idea of masturbation came from ( since medically it's seen as stress relieving etc.) Though I knew masturbation is haram but I had to weigh up the odds of it taking me out of that mindset of suicide (which is irreversable)(and yes i know there are better ways but barely anything worked for me at the time) And it was only intended as temporary thing. But it became a horrible addiction pretty soon that continued for the past year. It started to make me depressed even more because I knew I was disobeying Allah ÓÈÍÇäå æÊÚÇáì and prayed for help +repented. But after a while I gave up. Because even after I would repent out of guilt and said I wouldn't do it, I did it again. Nonetheless, I eventually managed to cut down the activity (pretty much stopped it) but then again I can never be to sure of myself. All I am sure of is that I want to do whatever I can to compensate for my actions so they may be pardoned. I know that closeness to Allah (Praises be to him) is the only thing that can give me peace in its entirety. Alhamdulilah, this Ramadan has been a blessing and really healing for me so far. However, I made the mistake again last night after a streak of going quite a long time without it(for me.) If there is any time of the year to kick evil habits it is Ramadan. Inshallah, I will continue to try. If you if you have any Duas, recommendations etc for this sort of thing,that would be really helpful. Now for my real question: all of this past year that I have been praying etc is without ghusl of Janaba. My fasts up untill now were without them too. Its not that i lack islamic knowledge generally, I do often seek it and practice it. However, I never came across Janaba in regards to woman doing them. I didn't know State of Janaba was a thing! Im not that old to be married. it's not a topic that is taught to young girls because I guess it is assumed they will do not masturbate. (Unlike males where it is kind of expected of them so they are prewarned about it.) Even online there isn't much about females in this sort of area. Firstly I'm still unsure and confused, can a female enter state of Janaba through masturbation? If so that means that I have been impure while doing my fasts and prayers up untill now. I am concerned as to what I should do about the fasts i have kept this Ramadan so far. Do they count? Should I make up for them? What about my salah? A whole year worth of my salah is invalidated? Do I have to redo them? Bearing in mind I didn't start regularly praying till like 14/15 or so. (Wasn't religious/ didn't understand my religion well) though alhamdulillah God guided me eventually and discover the sweeteness of salah. I have always intended to makeup those 5 years but don't know how and never got around to it. And now will another year's worth be added on to it? How can I make it possible to complete them with every day responsibilities like School, work etc. I apologise for the lengthy post but the reason why I described everything was maybe if any of you find faults in my thinking or ways maybe able to point out and help. Help a sister out of ignorance. Thank you for your time and may Allah send his mercy and blessings on all of you and your families this Ramadan. Inshallah
  8. Salaams, This year , Ramadhan has fallen on a very important study and exam period of mine as these exams will determine whether I get into University. Due to this, I haven't been fasting as having water improves my concentration whilst learning. I tried fasting and struggled to concentrate, got very tired and struggled to understand concepts. It was my niyyah to fast this month, and every morning I make an intention to fast, but then break my fast saying it is hard for me to study. I do taqleed of Ayotallah Sistani, who says break the fast when it is unbearable, and I find it unbearable to study without any water or energy. I tried fasting at night but struggled a lot as Im not an evening person and have never been able to study in the evening. I live in the UK where the fasts are 19 hours long, so it becomes very difficult for me. Could you advise me on whether I should be paying kaffarah on this and what I should do? Thank you
  9. Can a person with type 2 diabetes perform fasting, is it safe to do so? thank you!
  10. Mr.

    Salaam, as an ex-smoker I use a vape pen to satisfy my cravings, I was wondering if vaping whilst fasting would invalidate my fast? I've tried looking around for fatwas but I can find them regarding smoking, not vaping. Can anyone help me out? Jazakallah
  11. Salams, My question is regarding the state of Janabah in the month of Ramadhan. If a person wakes up being a mothalim in the month of Ramadhan a while before the fajr prayers and as the starts to perform ghusl the adhan for fajr Salah has started and ended before he was done is his fast still valid?
  12. Will fast become qasr?

    I'm living with my sister's family from the past two months and will be visiting my uncle for 3 days who lives 90 kms from her(during which I know that I can't fast as my roza will be qasr).my question is that when I come back my stay at my sister's will be only for 2 days n then I'll be flying back home. Can I fast on these 2 days?
  13. The month of Ramadan is a period of fasting, sacrifice, giving, piousness and self-training with the hope that these qualities will extend beyond this month and stay with us throughout the year. Indeed, the essence of fasting in Ramadan is spiritual. Nevertheless, this holy month also offers a number of benefits for both the mind and body. In a narration of Abu Nuaim, Prophet Mohammad said, “soomo wa tsahhoo”, which can be translated to mean, “Fast and be healthy.” Even science has proven that Ramadan is a month full of blessings. The International Congress on “Health and Ramadan” which was held in Casablanca in 1994, covered 50 studies on the medical ethics of Ramadan and noted various improvements in the health conditions of those who fast. If any negative effects were seen at all, it was in those who over-indulge in food at iftar or do not sleep well at night. You should also keep in mind that if fasting will be dangerous to your health, such as in Type 1 Diabetics, you are not recommended to fast as your medical condition may worsen. For those of you who can fast, read on to learn about some of the incredible health benefits of fasting on our overall well-being. Provides tranquility of the heart and mind There is intense spiritual meaning to Ramadan for those who fast. Muslims practice generosity by being charitable, family-bonding by gathering around the iftar table, spirituality by praying, and self-control by practicing good manners. All these habits build a feeling of peace, tranquility and self-satisfaction. Improves your blood fat levels A study conducted in 1997 in the Annals of Nutrition Metabolism demonstrated that fasting lowered bad “LDL” cholesterol levels by 8 percent, triglyceride by 30 percent, and increased good “HDL” levels by 14.3 percent thereby protecting your heart from cardiovascular disease. This can be explained by our eating and exercise habits. In Ramadan, people tend to go for healthier options such as dates, nuts, lentil soup, and home cooked meals. Studies have noted that overall saturated fat consumption, usually found in butter, lard, fatty meat, and fast food, is reduced in Ramadan. In addition, the night prayers of “tawarih” may provide an adequate level of physical activity equivalent to moderate physical activity which, for some, may be more than they usually exercise. May help you overcome addictions Addictions can come in all shapes and forms and Ramadan provides an excellent opportunity to ditch them. Because Ramadan teaches you self-restraint for most of the day, you will come to realize that forgoing your addiction all together may not be has hard as you think! Choose one addiction to drop this Ramadan. It could be an addiction to smoking, lying, chocolate, or even gossiping and say your good-byes. Promotes fat breakdown and weight loss Calorie consumption is overall decreased in Ramadan. Of course if you’re binge-eating on Arabic sweets that’s not going to happen. However, if you maintain your usual eating habits, you are very likely to eat less amounts of food and lose weight. This is especially true in Ramadan, when your source of Energy during your fast is mainly fat. Trying to stay lightly active during the day can promote even more fat break-down. Ramadan packages may be the perfect opportunity to re-train yourself and get back on track of eating healthy. When you fast, you learn to control your cravings. As a result, by the end of Ramadan you’ll have stronger will-power and you will have re-gained the strength to say no to tempting food.
  14. Hello. I'm a woman in my mid 20's. I haven't told anyone this, but when I was around the age of 9 I somehow came across masturbation by myself, like it just happened, and I continued to occasionally do it as the years went on. I honestly didn't know what it was I was doing until I became a teenager. It wasn't until 2 years ago where I was on ayatollah sistani's website, that I learned that masturbation was haram in Islam and that it requires ghusl jinabat. I have been fasting and doing my prayers since the age of 9, but because I did not do ghusl, would that mean I have to make up all those years worth of fasts and prayers from the age of 9, even though I did not know what I was doing was haram and that I needed to do ghusl? What do I need to do? Thanks for your help
  15. Timing of Fajr

    Salam There is consensus amongst Shias and Sunnis that fajr begins when there is a faint glow of the morning Sun across the horizon, before the Sun actually rises above the horizon. This is referred to in the verse in Surah Baqara v187: وَكُلُوا وَاشْرَبُوا حَتَّىٰ يَتَبَيَّنَ لَكُمُ الْخَيْطُ الْأَبْيَضُ مِنَ الْخَيْطِ الْأَسْوَدِ مِنَ الْفَجْرِ And eat and drink until the white thread becometh distinct to you from the black thread of the dawn. The white thread of dawn referred to in the verse is that faint glow of white across the horizon. This was fairly easy to see in the past when people lived in small communities without loads of buildings in the way, and without modern day light pollution. For most of us today, its a lot harder if not impossible to determine the start of fajr directly, so we rely on prayer timetables. Unfortunately there is no agreement amongst prayer timetables as to the start of fajr, with both Sunni and Shia timetables disagreeing with each other on the exact time. The disagreement basically boils down to what angle the Sun has to be below the horizon before the condition mentioned in the above verse is met, namely the appearance of a white thread across the horizon. Some say fajr begins when the Sun is 18 degrees below the horizon- this is known as the astronomical twilight. Others, such as Sayyid Muhammad Rizvi believe that fajr begins when the Sun is 12 degrees below the horizon- this is the nautical twilight. See here : https://www.al-islam.org/articles/al-fajr-sadiq-new-perspective-sayyid-muhammad-rizvi I've checked najaf.orgs timings against different angles, and cant seem to figure out what their method is : http://astro.ukho.gov.uk/surfbin/placefinder_beta.cgi?program=Prayers&ticket=d57af32f57c40e74 Recently, the OpenFajr project based in Birmingham has tried to determine the exact timing of fajr using a 180 degree camera, and a panel of experts, including the Seminary in Najaf (according to their paper). They have found that the timing of fajr isnt fixed to a particular angle of the Sun below the horizon, but seems to vary from 12 to 15 degrees in Birmingham. It could be different in other parts of the world. See here : http://www.openfajr.org/#about All this presents us with 2 problems: When are we supposed to pray fajr, and when do we begin our fasts? I havent been able to find anything from Sayid Sistani [ha] other than the general rule in the above verse. Caution seems to dictate that we pray at 12 degrees, but then when do we begin our fast? We can do Imsak, but for what time period? On Jan 1st in London, the Sun is at 12 degrees at 6.43am, and is at 15 degrees at 6.23, so 20mins Imsak gets us 3 degrees extra. But this is different at different times of the year Any suggestions or corrections welcome.
  16. Salamalekum, I see a lot of people here giving advice to youths, if they are unable to do nikah temporarily or permanent than to do fasting. So i would like to ask those people that are giving such advices to someone to practice fasting in order to control their desires. That have you yourself practice this method, if so for how long. I am not talking about for couple of days, but i want to know if you tried fasting for long periods of time like months and years, until you were able to get married. Therefore, if you have practice this technique, can you please tell me how was your experience and are you still fasting?
  17. A Muslim Greatest fear is his/her sins because h/she knows well with many sins it is not possible to achieve perfection and in such a condition, fire of the Hell is waiting for him/her. Hence, A Muslim is happy when the auspicious month of Ramadan comes, because according to a priceless saying of Prophet Mohammad: “He who fasts during the fasting month for the sake of Allah, all his sins will be forgiven.” (Tafsir-i-Maraqy, vol. 2, p. 69) And it is the best news for a Muslim with such a concern, because h/she knows after this Holy month, he will be pure and sinless and it guarantees his/her eternal happiness.
  18. Imagine you, God forbidden, became sick and referred to a doctor and h/she prescribed various drugs for you. What is your reaction? Will you protest the doctor for prescribing bitter taste drugs for you? What will be your reaction if someone do this? Surely you must say him/her your respond is not rational because a doctor studied and has been taught for several years and those bitter drugs described for you, are the result of his/her studies. And this behavior also is accepted by all wise people. This point can help us to be convinced regarding to Divine Commandments. If someone asks us why you do some difficult worship, our answer is this: trusting in a doctor is an accepted action while the doctor is not without mistakes while Allah the almighty is the Omniscient. So we trust Him when he says: “…and to fast is better for you, should you know.” (Holy Quran, 2:184)
  19. No one can deny the difficulty of fasting. One has to refrain eating, drinking and et cetera during a day and it becomes more difficult when Ramadan gets coincident with the summer. But what we must pay attention to is that no significant action will be found in which you do not need to bear difficulty. There is a famous term that says “no pain no gain.” As an example we can look at soccer players. In a soccer match, players have to run for 90 minutes to gain their goal and sometimes they have to play under rain or snow or under the sun. In addition, soccer players have to exercise every day to get ready for the match. This is not the only example and if you look around you can find many examples. So if for worldly cases we need to bear hardness, what will be if we confront with a matter which is related to eternal life? Fasting will be easy and tolerable if we pay attention to hereafter and our eternal fate.
  20. Is it ok to get laser hair removal whilst I'm fasting?
  21. If we look at worship actions by itself, perhaps we say they are boring and they make us tired, especially some worship that are difficult. For example when we are told that we must fast for one month in Ramadan, maybe it does not give us a good sense. But it is only the one side of a coin and such a problem will be solved by looking other side. When a Muslim is ordered to do a special worship, it means h/she is addressed by Allah the almighty. In other term, h/she deserved to be an addressee of God and it is a very high position in which no difficulty will be sensed. Now if we only want to talk about fasting we refer to verse 183 of second chapter in Holy Quran in which Allah SWT ordered to fast in Ramadan and this verse is started with “O' you who have Faith!” (یا ایها الذین آمنوا) And Imam Sadigh (the sixth Imam of Shia Muslims) says: "The pleasure found in (the phrase: ' O' you who have Faith! ' is so that) it has removed the tiredness of this worship and effort." (Majma'-al-Bayan, vol. 2, p. 27)
  22. Does a traveler who having fasted from fajr makes the intention and leaves his hometown (and breaks his fast) before Zuhr and returns the same day after Zuhr have to do qada' of the fast? I know you cannot fast if you return home after Zuhr. Jazakallah Khair
  23. Brothers please please reply to this asap. I am shia muslim, in my mid 20s. I have never ever masturbated in my life, never even touched the organ. I was talking to someone and got aroused, and by the time the time of suhoor ended. Now, there was some kind of liquid, I dont know what it was. I have read the difference between precum and all in detail, but I just cant decide, I am really kaseer ush shak so I am never able to decide. Now, being able to control myself from sins always, and right now I just dont know if I have invalidated my fast. I dont know of another forum to ask this. Please let me know what to do. I think it was clear sticky liquid, little amount. Just that this force and not force, I can ascertain. I just dont know! I found this on Ayt Sistani's website. NOW I dont even know if its semen or what. 1598. If semen is discharged from the body of a person involuntarily, his fast does not become void. But can this be my case in worst case scenario? considering best case is that it was precum or sth. Please remember me in your prayers. Please reply.
  24. Sacred religion of Islam as the last and the most complete religion has come to fulfill all human needs including material and spiritual. Therefore, Islamic teachings and orders pay attention to all human dimensions. In Holy month of Ramadan in which it is obligatory to fast, physical healing and benefits are considered as well. In a Hadith from Prophet Mohammad (SAWW) read: “Fast, you’ll be healthy” (Nahj-al feṣāḥa, p.547, n.1854) By review in some medical comments we see even non-Muslim scientists and doctors believe in physical benefits of fasting. For example the three fathers of Western Medicine; (Hippocrates, Galen & Paracelsus) prescribed fasting as the greatest remedy and the physician within. Life Magazine in its September 1996 issue considered fasting: the healing revolution. Also Dr. Joel Fuhrman in his book called “Fasting and Eating for Health” notes: “Fasting has been repeatedly observed to alleviate neuroses, anxiety and depression.” (p.19) There are many cases like them and no enough time to mention all, although the words of infallible Islam leaders are sufficient for us and we're proud of them.
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