Qa'im

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Qa'im last won the day on February 5

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About Qa'im

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    The Hadith Guy.
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  1. It's not about forcing your children into a religion, we cannot guide everyone we love. It's about raising them in an environment where sin is not the norm. If you marry a non-Muslim, your children will be exposed to someone that likely eats pork, drinks alcohol, does not pray much, and eats drinking shahr Ramadan. This can get worse with cheating (which is a lot more common among non-Muslim women), domestic violence, backbiting, and other activities that are more "normal" in a non-Muslim environment. As a matter of principle, your children will feel that these are very normal behaviours that they are used to seeing firsthand. I am born to Muslim parents - if I ever decided to commit one of these haram acts, it would at least be strange to me, and I would see it as wrong, or at least alien to my own upbringing and environment. Marriage is not just about good personality and good sex. It's about familial compatibility and lifestyle compatibility. Practically speaking, you also want to marry someone that motivates you to improve your relationship with Allah. A non-Muslim will, at best, just leave you alone in your practice, and at worse, question or mock your practice, and encourage you to abandon them. There is also divine rights that Muslim men and women must fulfill for one another as a matter of faith, not just decency, and a non-Muslim spouse may not agree with that.
  2. Most Iranian [men] that I have met were pretty soft-spoken, calm, polite, and intelligent. I'm not sure if it differs depending on region.
  3. You may find this useful http://www.shiachat.com/forum/blogs/entry/66-grading-hadiths-an-introduction/
  4. Many of our scholars acknowledge that the Prophet had 4 daughters, as well as other children that died in childhood. Fatima (as) was the only daughter that survived her father, the only ma`sum daughter, and the only daughter to have continued descendants. To answer your other question, why weren't there more children from other women: (1) Some of his wives were older widows, and generally, it is more difficult for older women to have children. (2) There were pre-modern forms of birth control. Other than coitus interruptus, men used palm leaves, papyrus, acacia gum, sheep skin, and sheep intestines. (3) For various other reasons, not every sexual encounter will result in male climax - some men have a stronger tolerance than others.
  5. Love and suffering is a match made in heaven. Love is breathlessly heart-wrenching, as it snares the mind of the lover and controls his actions. Any loving relationship will be filled with trial and tribulation, selfless sacrifice, selfish protectiveness, and frequent heartbreak. We both live and die for even a moment of true love. It is thus no coincidence that suffering is a component of many Arabic words for love. `Ishq (عشق), which is a fervent type of love, was originally a vine that winds itself around a tree, squeezing it until it withered. Shaghaf (شغف), which was the passion that Zulaykha had for Yusuf (12:3), was a form of heart disease. Muhjata qalb (مهجة قلب), an expression used to describe a lover, is actually the blood of the heart. Huyum (الهيوم), meaning passion, is a type of insanity. The Persian poem of Layla and Majnun comes to mind. Most of the Quran is relative-comparative. Its stories usually lack names, dates, places, and chronologies, and are instead filled with archetypal symbols that can be flexibly applied to other situations. It tries to tell the stories in a timeless and universal manner. The Husayni tragedy in Shii literature is similar. It is mourned by other prophets long before the event, it is mourned by nature (blood rain, blood earth, owls), it is mourned over by millions of angels, and it will be vindicated in the eschatological narrative. Karbala is described in Kamil al-Ziyarat as a piece of heaven on Earth, and as the conduit between heaven and earth (majma` as-samawati wal ard). Its soil is described as a cure, and it is given to the sick, and it is used for prostrations. In Shiism, the visitation of Husayn by one who correctly recognizes his status is considered a Hajj (or seven Hajj, or thousands of Hajj, or more), because the principle of Hajj is total submission and sacrifice, commemorating the sacrifice of Abraham; and Husayn cut his Hajj short to fulfill its end by going to Karbala and willingly giving himself to God. It is said that every grief in Islam is disliked, except for grief over Husayn, and so people forego their personal tragedies to mourn for the primordial epic tragedy. They wear black, abstain from makeup and dye, abstain from laughing, abstain from weddings and festive activities, sometimes for forty days. The love of Husayn is not just lip-service. It is the intense gallantry that a mother has over her child, the undying loyalty that a person has for their spouse, the forsaken mourning of a widow, and the adoration of a boy for his father. It is a blond closer than family and thicker than blood. His tragedy is the quintessential love story, with Abu Fadl al-`Abbas, Qasim b. al-Hasan, `Ali al-Akbar, `Ali al-Asghar, Habib b. Muthahir, and many other gems bravely followed their beloved into the engulfing abyss. Interestingly, there is no record of a relationship between the Imams and the historians of the tragedy, but there is much record of a relationship between the Imams and the poets. The Imams would invite poets to speak on the tragedy, make many supplications for them, add to their poetry, and gift them very generously. This to me says that the aim of the Shii is to find a meaningful and meta-historical route to Husayn, as the horrors of that day were unfathomable, and directed only at those who deserved it the least. Love and suffering are often paired in Islamic literature. There isn't really a concept of "happily ever after" in this world, it is rather seen as a prison of the believer, an abode of trials (dar al-bala'), a fleeting world (dar al-fana'), where the lovers of Ali will suffer the most, so that they may be refined and purified like gold in a furnace. The tradition says that those who suffer the most are the prophets and their successors, then those similar to them, and so on. The constant trial strengthens the faith of a true believer, who learns to lean on God alone. The timelessness of Islam's symbols emphasizes the finality of its message and the universality of its principles. Our religion uses relatable similitudes that resonate with our very core, making Islam not a seventh century Arabian phenomenon, but an expression of the nature in which we were created.
  6. Most of the Quran is relative-comparative. Its stories usually lack names, dates, places, and chronologies, and are instead filled with archetypal symbols that can be flexibly applied to other situations. It tries to tell the stories in a timeless and universal manner. The Husayni tragedy in Shii literature is similar - it is mourned by other prophets long before the event, it is mourned by nature (blood rain, blood earth, owls), it is mourned over by millions of angels, and it will be vindicated in the eschatological narrative. Karbala is described in Kamil al-Ziyarat as a piece of heaven on Earth, and as the conduit between heaven and earth (majma` as-samawati wal ard). Its soil is described as a cure, and it is given to the sick, and it is used for prostrations. In Shiism, the visitation of Husayn by one who correctly recognizes his status is considered a Hajj (or seven Hajj, or thousands of Hajj, or more), because the principle of Hajj is total submission and sacrifice, commemorating the sacrifice of Abraham; and Husayn cut his Hajj short to fulfill its end by going to Karbala and willingly giving himself to God. It is said that every grief in Islam is disliked, except for grief over Husayn, and so people forego their personal tragedies to mourn for the primordial epic tragedy. They wear black, abstain from makeup and dye, abstain from laughing, abstain from weddings and festive activities, sometimes for forty days. Interestingly, there is no record of a relationship between the Imams and the historians, but there is much record of a relationship between the Imams and the poets. The Imams would invite poets to speak on the tragedy, make many supplications for them, add to their poetry, and gift them very generously. This to me says that the aim of the Shii is to find a meaningful and meta-historical route to Husayn, as the horrors of that day were unfathomable, and directed only at those who deserved it the least. Another thing to keep in mind is that love and suffering are often paired in Islamic literature. There isn't really a concept of "happily ever after" in this world, it is rather seen as a prison of the believer, an abode of trials (dar al-bala'), a fleeting world (dar al-fana'), where the lovers of Ali will suffer the most, so that they may be refined and purified like gold in a furnace. The tradition says that those who suffer the most are the prophets and their successors, then those similar to them, and so on. The constant trial strengthens the faith of a true believer, who learns to lean on God alone.
  7. It is acknowledging reality - that everything in existence is either contingent or necessary, and it is impossible for there to be an unlimited chain of contingent things. There has to be something necessary and absolute that originated the universe and the laws under which it operates. That First Cause cannot be random, because random things do not occur out of pure nothingness (and I mean nothing - not just no molecules, but no laws too). Assume there were two gods. Each god would consist of two elemental qualities: (1) that which makes them a god, (2) that which makes them distinct from the other. The qualities that make the gods distinct cannot exist co-eternally, one must precede the other, which makes the other created and therefore not God. Moreover, if there were two gods, their wills would conflict and contradict one another, and no universal order would exist in the creation or in logic. Islamic monotheism is the most advanced. The God of the philosopher is basically the Muslim God, and not a triune god-man or incarnation like in Christianity or Hinduism. Our God is completely uncreated and cannot be limited by time-space. He is neither matter nor spirit, as the Uncaused Cause would need to be totally distinct from that which He creates.
  8. The root ethic in Islam is maintaining a healthy heart. I'm not referring to the pulsating organ in your left chest, but rather I'm referring to the qalb. The heart is the metaphysical mind and conscience that the Quran ties to our thoughts and feelings. It is the locus of our faith, the home of our innermost secrets, the intuitive criterion for good and evil, and the organ through which our Creator is known. In the hadith literature, the heart is connected to all of the senses: seeing, hearing, tasting, feeling, and smelling; and the information that these senses receive are directed to the heart. The heart then identifies and interprets this information. The heart is the Imam of the body that answers the questions of the body and clarifies its doubts. ( قلت أ فلك قلب قال نعم قال قلت فما تصنع به قال أميز به كلما ورد على هذه الجوارح قال قلت أ فليس في هذه الجوارح غنى عن القلب قال لا قلت وكيف ذلك وهي صحيحة قال يا بني إن الجوارح إذا شكت في شيء شمته أو رأته أو ذاقته ردته إلى القلب فليقر به اليقين ويبطل الشك قال قلت فإنما أقام الله عز وجل القلب لشك الجوارح قال نعم قال قلت ولا بد من القلب وإلا لم يستيقن الجوارح قال نعم قال قلت يا أبا مروان إن الله لم يترك جوارحك حتى جعل لها إماما يصحح لها الصحيح وينفي ما شكت فيه ويترك هذا الخلق كلهم في حيرتهم وشكهم واختلافهم لا يقيم لهم إماما يردون إليه شكهم وحيرتهم ويقيم لك إماما لجوارحك يرد إليك شكك وحيرتك ) The root verb (قلب) means to turn, to flip, and to change. A healthy heart is soft: it fluidly changes from state to state, depending on its surroundings. If it perceives oppression, it expresses hatred for the oppressor and sympathy for the oppressed. If it perceives God's signs, it basks in wonder and amazement. If it perceives love, it loves. It is constantly reflecting and "turning", hence the root word. An unhealthy heart is a hard heart: it is numb, heavy, heedless, stagnant, and does not react to its surroundings. It is desensitized to good and evil, and it does not recognize God's signs. Its hardness impedes its ability to flux, which is what a heart is made to do. The goal of Islamic ethics is to remain soft-hearted by practicing humility, by crying over injustice, to curb our arrogance and heedlessness, to be selfless, and to return to our natural order. Yes, having a soft-heart can be painful, but those who turn their heart into a hard shell become bitter, distant, selfish, and absent-minded. Rather than genuinely turning their pain into a lesson, they mentally run away from their problems by locking their heart and letting nothing in. But only through heartfelt contemplation can true progress take place, both within yourself and within your society. For some, the family is the basic unit of society. Family is seen as the building block of civilization, and the most basic natural association for the physical and emotional fulfillment of a people. For others, the individual is the basic unit of society, because individuals enjoy their own agency, even if they work towards a common end. The basic unit of society in Islam, however, appears to be the heart. Being in a family is an ideal state, but it is not the reality for many people, nor is it wajib, nor does a family have complete agency. But similarly, to say that the individual is the basis is to assume that society is an amalgamation of separate, competing, selfish, and divergent people. The reality is that people are very connected - by blood, by tribe, by religion, by party, and by common interest. The heart in Islam does not deny the agency of the individual, but it is much more than individualism. It connects a person to his surroundings, and a cultivated heart is connected to that universal intellect (العقل الكلي) that is mindful of God and His divine authority. And so the goal of a society should not just be productivity, because a productivity that ignores goodness is destructive. Rather, the goal of a society should be to maintain its humanity. A hard heart is vain, greedy, and heedless, while a soft heart is selfless, compassionate, and seeking constant betterment. If the basic unit is cultivated, our societal and political affairs will change overnight (13:11). Everything else in society - our families, our workplaces, our entertainment, our religion, and our social lives - should all be geared towards maintaining and improving the basic unit of our society.
  9. I'm not living in there anymore, but I spent most of my life in Mississauga.
  10. I've lived in the area for most of my life. It's decent, there is a lot to do. It mostly consists of middle to upper middle class people, mostly immigrants, lots of South Asians, lots of Muslims. The Shias live more in Toronto (York, Thornhill, Richmond Hill), but you'll find some pockets in Brampton (Ma`sumeen Centre), which is not a far drive from Mississuaga. There's a lot of traffic, and people mostly keep to themselves. Having a car is a must.
  11. The relevant part: The people said, "The Prophet of Allah is taller than the stocky people, and shorter than the extremely tall people. His colour is like silver and gold. His chest was the widest of the people. There is a vein between his eyes. His nose is thin and curved. His forehead is broad. His beard is full. There is a space between his [front two] teeth. There is a mole on his lower lip. His neck is like a silver jug. His shoulders are wide. His stomach and his chest are even. His fingers are thick and his palms are large. When he walks, he walks quickly, and when he turns, he turns with his whole body. His hand is soft, like the back of a rabbit. When he stands for a person, he does not sit until the person sits. When he sits, he does not unwind his turban until his guest has left." So the bedouin came and looked at the Prophet and recognized him. He placed his staff upon the head of the camel of the Messenger of Allah, so the people turned and said, "Why so forthright, O bedouin?" The Prophet said, "Bring him, for he is in need." Then, he said, "What do you need?" The bedouin man said, "Your messengers have come to us, telling us to establish prayer, to give alms, to make pilgrimage to the House, to bathe after intercourse and seminal discharge. My people have sent me to you. I want to verify you, but I am afraid of angering you." The Prophet replied, "I will not be angered. Surely, I am the one whom Allah has named 'Muhammad' in the Torah and the Gospel. The Messenger of Allah, the Elect One, the Chosen One, who shall not be obscene or absurd in the markets, who shall not return evil with evil, but rather will return evil with good. So ask me whatever you wish. I am the one whom Allah has said of me in the Qur'an, 'If you had been rude and hard-hearted, they would have disbanded from you.' (3:159) So ask whatever you want."
  12. ShiaChat's activity has certainly waned, but there will always be a need for an anonymous space for learned and lay Shi`as to discuss things that are not normally discussed in mosque settings. SC is also high up for a lot of google searches.
  13. As for direct and explicit quotations from the Qur'an that says that the Torah is corrupt, that does not exist in those words. Our conclusions on its corruption is a result of a lot of corroborating evidences, such as (1) verses that say that the Jews and Christians were corrupting scriptures in general, (2) verses that say that the Qur'an is the criterion (furqan) for what is truthful in the previous scriptures, (3) stories in the Qur'an that are in direct contradiction to biblical accounts, (4) historical and textual arguments against the authenticity of the scriptures, (5) instructions from the Prophet to neither believe nor disbelieve in the previous scriptures (6) the presence of biblical stories that may seem insulting to God or a prophet of God (Lot sleeping with his daughters, Noah being a drunk, rape, incest, genocide, etc), (7) the presence of abrogated rulings in the Scriptures, which negate their authority even if they were to be authentic. Nowadays, reason #4 is enough for most people to confirm their doubts in the previous scriptures. That does not mean they are of 0 value - but we see our stuff as a purer and more finalized version of the previous stuff.
  14. I'm not sure, I think the term would encompass both blue-eyed and bleary-eyed women, but Allahu a`lam.
  15. Yes, the term extends to the blind and those with cloudy vision as well. "Bleary-eyed", as mentioned in 20:102, refers to the clouding of the cornea, giving it a blueish or grayish tinge. This condition can cause blindness.